[OT] Reflowing PCBs in toaster ovens - Page 2

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Re: Linux-based board layout software [was Re: Reflowing PCBs in toaster ovens]

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There is one package that is Windows and Linux. There is a limited version
for free download at:-

        http://www.vutrax.co.uk /

The only thing you will need to do is pay for improved capability (board
size). I am thinking of using this one myself.

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Re: Reflowing PCBs in toaster ovens
Are you saying that http://www.4pcb.com will do assembly in
proto quantities?

I went to their web site and didn't see any service offered to
attach IC's to the PCBs.

I am looking for companies that will do a small soldering job
for cheap for proto quantities. BGA in particular.

snipped-for-privacy@larwe.com wrote:
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Re: Reflowing PCBs in toaster ovens
Hello B,

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In my experience it is easier to hire a local tech as a temp for that.
The hassle of shipping bags of part to the assembly place and then back
causes too much cost and trouble. Of course, with very large SMT boards
that's a different matter but even then I still try to find local
providers. Distributors know where they are.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: Reflowing PCBs in toaster ovens
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They're a PCB house, not a CM. They have links to some CM people they
recommend. But we were talking about PCB etching, not contract
assembly. For prototype quantities it's better to assemble in-house by
hand anyway so you can test the board during bring-up. Case in point,
the project for which I received boards yesterday had a short from +5V
to gnd (my stupid layout error). Would not have been able to fix that
with a simple track cut if the board had been completely stuffed.


Re: Reflowing PCBs in toaster ovens

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Ditto.  Great quality, IME.  They've consistently met expectations.  And
they waive the 3-piece minimum for educators and students.  They also
started including 2-sided silkscreen in the 33each.com deal, where
others don't.  For a reasonable $50/batch you can do multiple parts per
60inch area now too - that's a lot of small boards if you're willing to
route them yourself.

I've found that everyone's "hot deal" comes out to $100 a job, minimum
(excepting Olimex).  So, unless you really need more than 3 boards in a
spin there's no reason to look elsewhere, especially with Advanced
Circuits' tolerances, quality, and turn time.

But for any volume of tiny boards with mask & silk, Olimex seems to
offer the best deal by charging by the area, not the piece.  Trade-offs
are longer delivery time and lower tolerances - IIRC, Olimex only does
0.010 or 0.008 lines and 0.024 vias.


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 > essentially the same prototype deal prorated
 > for smaller board sizes. Bare bones works out
 > cheaper if you want to do several copies of a
 > single small board.

Good for a quick spin.  I can live without the silkscreen, but I
wouldn't enjoy the SMD soldering without mask.


Re: Reflowing PCBs in toaster ovens
Hi Richard,

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AFAIK the smallest standard drill size at Olimex is 28mils (0.7mm) but
that decreases a bit with plating. Pretty big. They do allow you to
panelize and even cut the sub-boards up for you which is nice.

Does anybody have experience how their lowest cost ($9) airmail parcel
option works into the US?

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: Reflowing PCBs in toaster ovens

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Do you understand what a solder mask is?  Apparently not.  The bare bones
deal very clearly doesn't include masks, which makes it worthless for the BGA's.





Re: Reflowing PCBs in toaster ovens

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They
prototype
if
bones

I didn't look at the barebones deal that closely, because it never made
sense for me economically. No need to get so shirty.


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