Another embedded Ethernet question...

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View

I have a small project involving transferring a bi-directional 64k
synchronous data stream over an IP network to the same device on
the other end.  It is a fairly simple application except for some
timing issues.  It will have a telnet server operator interface for
configuring the unit.

The unit will be made in small quantities - like 100 or a year - so
I have to keep the initial costs for the development tools down as
much as possible.  Of course, there is a short development cycle
constraint as well.

Right now we're looking at the PIC18 with the Microchip IP stack,
the 80C400 with the built-in stack, and someone is trying to
convince me to go the MSP430 route.  I just saw the DSTni chip from
Lantronix (now sold by Grid Connect). It looks interesting. I've
used the Infineon C165 for years.

Our local distributor is steering me away from the Dallas/Maxim
part because he claims it's difficult to buy them without a long
lead time.

I'm open to any suggestions or opinions about the ones I'm looking
at or any similar alternative.

 
Casey


Re: Another embedded Ethernet question...
Quoted text here. Click to load it

As far as I am aware, the DSTini from Lantronix and the Dallas Chip
 DS80C400) are two entirely different chips....unless I misunderstand your
posting.

Anyway use google groups to search for the following threads :
"ethernet connectivity" posted by "goose" on 2003-07-17
and
"my experiences with IIM7010 %-)" on 14 Feb 2003 by Jan-Hinnerk

these posting mention the Wiznet chip, which is another alternative for you
to consider - I know we got samples fairly quickly ...

Regards
Simon



Re: Another embedded Ethernet question...
Simon Berry said for all posterity...
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Oh, yeah they are different devices.  I probably didn't make it
very clear.  The ones I mentioned were all separate candidates:

DS80C400  (TCP/IP stack in firmware)
DSTni (each chip licensed for free TCP/IP stack and telnet)
PIC18 (free TCP/IP stack)
MSP430 (still looking at available software)

The PIC looks good, but the 4K RAM limit definitely puts an upper
limit on feature creep...

 
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Thanks.  I'm looking at it now.

I hate quickly-prepared proposals but I have no choice but to guess
and estimate quickly.  Estimate now or customer goes away.  <Sigh>


Casey

Re: Another embedded Ethernet question...
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Casey,

Rabbit Semiconductor (http://www.rabbitsemi.com ) has both 8-bit
microcontrollers (Z180-compatible) and Ethernet-ready modules based on
them.
The latter should be a quite good offering when volumes are low;
you get a working solution out the door in a very short time.

Rabbit offer a *complete* solution consisting of:
- evaluation kits (motherboard + various modules); price range
$150-$300
- "Dynamic C" complete IDE w. integrated
C-compiler/assembler/linker/debugger
  (comes 'for free' w. the evalkits)
- royalty-free TCP/IP stack (w. complete sourcecode!)
- complete suite of libraries: std.C, math, device/peripheral drivers,
  filesystem, TCP/IP&'all the rest' of low&middle-layer protocol
access
- BIOS/ROM-debugmonitor & small realtime kernel
- Flash upload utility (source code for host(PC) side can be obtained)
- royalty-free ports of "uCOS-II" RTOS
- various servers: Telnet, HTTP w.CGI, FTP/TFTP, cmd.shell(console
login utility)
- extensive documentation; TCP/IP architecture&usage, libraries,
modules&evalkits, Dynamic C IDE&tools

A user-contributed collection of libraries exists too
(http://rabbitlib.sourceforge.net - SMBclient, XML, lowlevel etc.)

You can use the console login facility (ZConsole/ZLib) to do
things like 'reboot', TCP/IP setup, filesystem manipulation (<n>Modem
up/download) and webserver start/stop/configuration +++
via a serial port or via Ethernet or dialup(PPP).

At present, there are two microcontroller variants available:
1. R2000 - medium performance(<33%MHz), 4xUSARTs (upto 460Kbps async)
2. R3000 - relatively hi-perf.(<55%MHz), 6xUSARTs (2 w. HDLC cntrlr)
Both are 'ROM-less' utilizing external SRAM/Flash for data&code,
but R3000 has a secondary meorybus (a.k.a. "Auxilliary I/O bus")
dedicated
for memory-mapped peripherals.
Peripherals integrated are RTC, timers&counters, hi-speed USARTs, SPI
and parallell slave ports, plus GPIO - but none of analog type.

You have the option to use modules based on these two processors;
either the RCM2xxx range (R2K-based) or the RCM3xxx(R3K-based) -
which come in three flavours:
a) completely self-contained Ethernet module w.RJ-45 jack
b) Ethernet-ready module w/o the RJ-45 connector or magnetics
c) module w. SRAM&Flash, but no Ethernet

Rabbit has drivers for the following Ethernet controllers
* RealTek RTL8019AS (10Base-T)
* Crystal CS8900A (10Base-T)
* SMsC LAN91C111/LAN91C113 (10/100Base-TX)
* Davicom DM9000E (10/100Base-TX) soon ...
These are used on various modules & evalkits.
But, the R3000 is going to be equipped w. a 10/100MAC in the next
revision.

If you don't approve the use of Rabbit's tools (which are not 100%
ANSI C!),
you have the option of using a toolset from SoftTools
(http://softtools.com )
This costs somewhat more, of course ...;-)
Hope this could be of interest!

Rgds:
-Morten

Site Timeline