Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design - Page 2

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Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design

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Whenever wires come into play they always screw up like Jan Panteltje
already more or less pointed out.

--  
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
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Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 05:34:22 -0500, Spehro Pefhany

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The content on a monitor picture projected on the operators face

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 05:34:22 -0500, Spehro Pefhany wrote:

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Where to start?

Computers that make those "ticky-ticky" noises when they work.

The CSI departments scattered around the country that actually have money  
for buildings, furniture, and computer systems (the four foot square  
light table that's all touch-screen -- I'm sure that fits easily into any  
PD's budget).

All high-speed collisions end in a ball of flame.

Humans can get flung 20 feet through the air, impact a wall, slide down  
to the ground, and never come out of it worse than mildly stunned.

Oddly enough, I know full well that woman police detectives, coroners,  
and attorneys are not all young, and do not all show up to work every day  
with perfect hair and makeup, wearing clothing that shows plenty of leg  
and cleavage.  Yet this does not bother me on the TV shows...

--  
Tim Wescott
Control system and signal processing consulting
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Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design

Tim Wescott wrote:
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   The legs & cleavage don't bother you?

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 13:48:51 -0500, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

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Strangely, no.

Now, if the _men_ were showing cleavage, _that_ would be weird.

--  
My liberal friends think I'm a conservative kook.
My conservative friends think I'm a liberal kook.
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Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design

Tim Wescott wrote:
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   You don't even take a second look? :)

  
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   Wouldn't that depend on how much cleavage?  Old guys can get a little
flab there, but DD's WOULD be a jaw dropper. ;-)

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 05:34:22 -0500, Spehro Pefhany

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I need to be drugged or inebriated before I can ignore the science
fiction.

Long ago, I went to see The Poseidon Adventure with a class of
students from the Naval Postgraduate Skool in Monterey.  I didn't
catch all the mistakes that a nautical engineer was expected to
notice, but there were plenty.  Unfortunately, I couldn't easily ask
what was happening as they were almost continuously howling and
laughing during the movie.

More recently, there was the movie Twister.  Near the end the hero and
heroine dive into a water well and hang on while the tornado tries to
suck them out of the well.  Just one problem.  Where was the air
blowing from the bottom of the well coming from?  I was at Costco
watching parts of the movie pointing out other physics errors when a
13 year old asked me to stop because I was ruining the movie.  Now I
know which is more important, physics or entertainment.

For electronic specific mistakes, I'm always impressed at how easily
radio, cellular, and wireline communications works under adverse
conditions.  There might be a geomagnetic storm, ready to devastate
the planet, but HF communications still seems to be functional.  I'm
also amazed at how well radio direction finders work on the screen. Of
course, no evil genius would be considered effective without the
requisite console full of confusing flashing lights.

What impresses me most are the pyrotechnics and explosions produced by
failing electronics.  When I blow something up, there's maybe a small
pop and a small puff of toxic fumes.  On the screen, it's more like a
major pyrotechnics display.  Amazingly, nothing ever seems to catch
fire on screen.  

Google for "movie mistakes".  There are plenty of web sites with film
clips and details.


--  
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
On 2013-02-25 18:02, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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Indeed. I'd be the first to notice all the inconsistencies and
errors against physics in movies, but at least I have the decency
not to point them out aloud. People go to movies to be entertained;
Not to learn physics.

I agree that some of the grossest blunders spoil the fun for me,
but I'd hate to be in the same theatre with some wise crack pointing
out the errors. Not that I ever go to movies anymore: I can't stand
the popcorn crunchers either.

Sigh. I suppose one's stock of patience with such things runs out
on getting older.

Jeroen Belleman

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
wrote:

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This was standing around the TV section of Costco, which would hardly
qualify as an entertainment facility.  The people I was with were
genuinely interested in my physics lessons (probably because they
could later irritate their friends in the same manner).  I would not
do that in a theater or even at home.

Incidentally, the mob from NPS were on a class assignment where the
students were required to watch the movie and identify the errors.
Everyone (except me) was marking time taking notes.

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The last movie I saw in a theater was the original Star Wars movie.
Well, I've attended a few kids parties at theaters, but that was
anything but entertaining (i.e. herding cats and kids).

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One gets a different picture of the value of entertainment when school
kids base their understanding of physics and electronics on the
movies.  The best thing that's happend is Mythbusters, which is
physics disguised as entertainment.  While I would not expect to learn
much from the Mythbusters shows, it does provide a good basis for kids
to suspect that the physics they see in the movies is not exactly
real.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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   The last I saw was 'Chicken Run' Its website had a free calculator
you could download, but the website is gone. :)

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
wrote:

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The bottom of the well, obviously.

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I would guess that in a movie theater that a physics lesson wouldn't
be appropriate anymore than watching "Twister" would be in a college
physics lecture.

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This, of course, is dependant on the writer's need for the characters
to communicate.  A blackout is often more useful.
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It seems Joerg doesn't share your calm life.  

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Mistakes are different than suspension of disbelief.  If the writer
was bound by the known physics it would make for some pretty boring
stories; hardly science fiction.

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design

krw@attt.bizz wrote:
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   Joerg makes his own resistors out of black powder, though.

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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   Your electronics have all been demiliterized.  There have been cases
where military srplus electronics hit the market without removing the
self destruct charges.

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 13:52:18 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

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That would be me.  In about 1960, I brought home from J.J. Glass
Electronics in Smog Angeles a pile of BC-645(?) IFF transponders one
of which still had the destruct charges installed.  My parents called
the police, which arrived with the bomb squad.  They fired it off
inside a big trailer.  Lots of smoke, but no bang.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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   Some were thermite, and big enough to turn the equimpent into a
puddle of molten metal.  I think they were the ones left on some
surplused Norden Bombsites.

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design

Spehro Pefhany wrote:
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   An Italian made Sci-Fi movie where they yell, "Hit them with the
lasers", then use flamethrowers inside a spaceship.

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
On 26/02/2013 2:43 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:
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I reckon the all time classic (which is still being done) is the old
"Hit the fire alarm button" whereupon all the sprinklers come on.


Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design

Rheilly Phoull wrote:
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   There was a very bad Sci-Fi movie on Antenna TV tonight.  Three hours
of mistakes, made in 1969 and titled 'Marooned'.

Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
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How about explosions in space? Any and all explosions?

Of course, I'll admit that I have no idea what a weightless explosion
in a vacuum _should_ look like, but I'm fairly certain that it won't
involve puffy clouds of smoke billowing out or flames that burn
"upward". <grin!>

S'funny... this seems like a MythBusters natural, but I don't think
theyve ever done a show on what substances do... or do not... make
nice, exciting explosions in space.  Maybe NASA launches are outside
their budget?


Frank McKenney
--  
  ...[I]n the nineteenth century, reading novels was criticized for
  exactly the same reasons for which watching television is criticized
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Re: Sorta-OT: Movies and Electronic Design
On 10/03/2013 20:30, Frnak McKenney wrote:
wrote:
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They are just very slightly more symmetrical than they would be under  
gravity, and the bits just keep going in a straight line and don't fall  
downwards in a parabola. The rate of energy release in an explosion is  
such that gravity is only a minor bit player in the early dynamics.

There are plenty of examples of extremely large explosions in space to  
study - the brightest one being the supernova remnant Cass A.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassiopeia_A

It isn't quite spherically symmetrical because the star was spinning and  
losing mass from its equatorial bulge before it went pop.

They are widely studied as standard candles that can be seen from almost  
the edge of the observable universe. A single type II supernova at its  
brightest can outshine an entire galaxy for a few days.

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap050719.html

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It is the burning paraffin flames that look the strangest in space!

Fire in space is much more interesting although dangerous to play with.  
Without gravity to move air into the burn zone it becomes a diffusion  
limited spherical shell burn front and progresses slowly.

Scale model people do a great job with dimensional analysis to make  
things behave approximately right for full scale but some things like  
smoke and the wetness of water are not so amenable to being cheated.  
Basically they film it at a different rate to actual playback to make it  
look right for the full scale real world.

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It is generally considered very bad form to explode things in Earth  
orbit since the fragments produced can damage other satellites.

--  
Regards,
Martin Brown

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