Re: Soldering irons: made in America but designed in Russia?

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I thought the Miata was ugly, until I saw a PT Cruiser. ;-)

Cheers!
Rich


Re: Soldering irons: made in America but designed in Russia?
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The design is reminiscent of the Chrysler Airstream, which was a major flop
70+ years ago.



Re: Soldering irons: made in America but designed in Russia?
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AFAIK the Airstream was not a major flop. The Airflow was, but mostly
due to really bad manufacturing defects.

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Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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Re: Soldering irons: made in America but designed in Russia?
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I might have gotten the name wrong, as I was in a rush. Regardless, Chrysler
produced a "streamlined" car that the public didn't warm to.



Re: Soldering irons: made in America but designed in Russia?
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Reason I mentioned it was that the Airflow doesn't look similar to the
PT Cruiser at all while the Airstream does (with the PT Cruiser being a
whole lot smaller).

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Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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Re: Soldering irons: made in America but designed in Russia?
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The Airflow was Ferdinand Porsche's inspiration for the Volkswagen.
That's why most people's immediate reaction on seeing it is "Whoa--a
huge Beetle!"

Cheers,

Phil Hobbs

Re: Soldering irons: made in America but designed in Russia?
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Not really. AFAIK it was this one that inspired Porsche, he supposedly
had technical discussions with Hans Ledwinka who designed the Tatra car:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tatra_T_77a.jpg

Hard to say though because the Chrysler Airflow came to market at just
about the same time. However, back in those days there was no fast mail,
Internet or even air travel between the US and Europe so information
exchanges would have been slow.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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