voltage from measure_volts

JN> Hi, JN> my raspi4 is booting and running from an USB-SSD Harddrive connected JN> with no additional power for the harddrrive. JN> With "stress" i simulate some stress for CPU / IO and RAM. At the moment JN> (first 6 hours), everything works as expected. JN> JN> The measure_volts shows me ~ 0,84V and CPU Temp ~ 84°C (at stresstest)m JN> without stress ist is at 58°C. JN> JN> Is this OK for 24/7 running? JN> JN> JN> Jan JN> JN> --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05 JN> * Origin: Agency HUB, Dunedin - New Zealand | FidoUsenet Gateway
Throttling will kick in at 82C, and 84C is a little high - but if you said that was just at stress, its ok for short periods. 58C is ok for normal operations, but that being said you can easily get it down a bit if you try. Are you using any cooling now? Passive will (unless you're already running some..) drop you a few degrees, more if its a beefy passive heatsink. If you use a heatsink and a small fan you could get down to the mid 40s. I suggest an iceCooler - I run in the mid 30s on normal use...
Anyway, you are within the accepted range if thats all you wanted to know. :P Cheers.
Reply to
paul lee
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Hi,
my raspi4 is booting and running from an USB-SSD Harddrive connected
with no additional power for the harddrrive.
With "stress" i simulate some stress for CPU / IO and RAM. At the moment
(first 6 hours), everything works as expected.
Is this OK for 24/7 running?
Jan
Reply to
Jan Novak
"Officially, the Raspberry Pi Foundation recommends that the temperature of your Raspberry Pi device should be below 85 degrees Celsius for it to work properly. That?s the maximum limit. But it would start throttling at 82 degrees Celsius."
For what its worth., Been on a few months
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
I've been running that combination on the Pi 3B, 3B+ and 4B for years without issues.
m
During the stress test it will be thermally throttling, which shouldn't do any harm for short periods, but either a large passive heatsink or a small fan will prevent it getting that hot, and avoid the performance drop off.
58C for normal running is fine 24/7.
---druck
Reply to
druck
Am 24.09.20 um 06:14 schrieb paul lee:
If you use a heatsink and a small fan you could get
I use now an active cooler... buit this will also use power.
Yes, this was my primary question.
Thanks
Jan
Reply to
Jan Novak
Is there any real point to getting it that low? The cooler is probably using twice as much power as the Pi.
One of mine Pis in shed got down to 19.7C CPU temp during the winter, it didn't run any better than when it was 72.8C in the summer :)
---druck
Reply to
druck
Serious answer from an ex electronics engineer. Semiconductors and indeed all components age. possibly the worst offenders are capacitors with liquids inside - the old wax paper condensers and modern electrolytics are two culprits that change values with age and may fail completely.
This form of ageing is very much a function of heat. As far as semiconductors go, there are two completely different thermally related failure modes.
One is failure of the hermetic seals to the chips caused by temperature *cycling*. Hot and cold cycles can also fatigue internal wires.
The second is electromigration. Over time the actual dopant ions physically migrate in the junction area, leading to loss of performance and eventually out of spec. behaviour. Temperature accelerates this.
Operation at junction temperatures near the limit of usually around
I have seen cases of CPU fan failure on SPARC and INTEL CPUs that have destroyed the CPU altogether, although usually the users switch them off when performance becomes erratic.
So in the limit, yes, high temperature and temperature cycling destroys
very hard thing to quantify.
case temperatures, they sizzled with a wet finger. I have had a Schottky diode accidentally shorted across a battery physically unsolder itself...without apparent damage.
So there is a real point, but how important it is? is very hard to quantify.
Its like SSD failure, everyone knows that writes destroy SSDs over time, but how fast?
And then examination of SMART data suggest 'a lot slower than bearings wear out in, or oxide flakes off, a conventional drive'
In reality I suspect your Pi will be obsolete before it dies of heat exhaustion. :-).
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If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will  
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Am 29.09.20 um 11:51 schrieb The Natural Philosopher:
thats may be true :-)
Jan
Reply to
Jan Novak
[Snip all eminently sensible points]
The Pi in question is my very first 256MB model B, obsolete in every way, but just refuses to die - British engineering at its best!
---druck
Reply to
druck

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