Thin Client replacement

I wouldn't know - haven't bought one for over a decade and then I paid
on the HDD).
Again I wouldn't know - my stuff all runs Fedora except my RPi - but it sounds like a lot of dosh for the functionality provided.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
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Martin Gregorie
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I've used my Pi3 to RDP over ssh in to several Windows and Linux machines at work, doing development work, and it was plenty fast enough. The only drawback is the Linux RDP client are Windows 7 level, rather than Windows 8, but don't do font smoothing as well at less than 1:1 scaling with Windows (Linux x11vnc+xrdp is fine).
The Pi3 over ssh is a lot faster than a fast Windows i5 laptop using the companies VPN, so the transport can be a big factor.
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druck
No, just fulfilling the OP's stated requirement: "Web browser and terminal windows should restart and connect to predefined addresses if closed by accident."
Horses for courses. I don't think the OP is concerned to that level. IMBW.
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
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Mike Scott
You don't think that crashing is a member of the set of 'closed by accident' then?
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
If the xterm or ssh in that example crash then the shell loop will certainly continue. If the shell crashes (very rare indeed), or the processes hang then it won't.
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Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
That looks a bit aggressive: shouldn't it check that the process has in fact crashed before restarting it?
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
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Martin Gregorie
Write a systemd service unit for it, with a restart=always clause
v v v v v v v v v
then when PID 1 crashes .... D&RFC
Reply to
Andy Burns
Hi all,
was offline for a few days but saw that lots of useful and interesting replies have come in meanwhile. Thanks a lot, guys! I'll be back with more questions once I start getting this up.
robert
Reply to
Robert Latest
Frankly, I don't even know what "thin client" really means -- all I know is that the current Windows-based wall-mounted PCs are called thin clients, and this colleague of mine and I want to replace them with cheap, reliable stuff.
This is big corporation type issue. Windows OS and hardware is leased from and maintaned by an external contractor, with extra charges for units deployed on the 24/7 shop floor. Huge cost for a few hundred terminals and web browsers.
"Browser experience" is not an issue. The browser is only needed for quasi-static, text-only, purely technical content in an industrial production environment. An ncurses-based text-only browser is out due to lack of user acceptance and smooth transition from today's GUI (IE) solution.
robert
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Robert Latest
AFAIK they ain't, and they shouldn't be considering what they cost maintenance-wise, but as we all know, the danger is there.
They don't.
robert
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Robert Latest
Originally a 'thin client' was a serial terminal. Where all the clever stuff is dine on the server.
Whether a browser is a thin or a thick client depends on how much JavaScript you write :-)
Arguably a browser interfacing to a database is pretty 'thin' - its just a terminal with some graphics ability.
Yep.
Yep. Plenty of options for a basic browser. Especially if you can restrict web pages to exactly what it understands and format exactly for the screens available. Heck you could go back to firefox release 3 or something...
You could, given the simplicity of what you appear to want, even write your own cut-down browser in python or something.
One of the advantages of a private industrial installation is that you ought to be able to come up with a configuration that needs no upgrades ever.
Until the hardware is so obsolete it cant be replaced or fixed.
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Many years ago I was sitting at the computer doing something and our youmger son was reading a magazine while my wife was reading the paper.
He asked "What is a thin client?" and - quick as a flash - said "It's certainly not your dad.".
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David Wild using RISC OS on broadband 
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David H Wild
I must respectfully disagree. The chromimum port offered for raspberry pi runs very nicely on a pi 3. It runs youtube video smoothly apart from occasional stalls that can be remedied by advancing the progress bar a smidge. Full screen is a stretch for it, but that does not seem to be wanted.
bob prohaska
Reply to
bob prohaska
I concur, Chromium runs very nicely. I switched over to it on my Pi2 & Pi3 (as well as slower x86 boxes) as Firefox became far too slow a couple of versions ago.
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druck
on my *86 Firefox often locks up with 'script not responding' - never used to.
Anyone tried sea monkey?
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
After sticking with x86 Firefox for years I finally tried another browser. Am glad I did. Things which I had put down to dodgy web pages - such as high memory consumption and high CPU usage - seem not to be with the web pages after all....
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James Harris
Reply to
James Harris
No, since I jumped to SRware Iron (a de-googled chrome/chromium) I haven't had one instance of "not responding" or having to quit/restart browser to get memory back every few days.
Given the feature-copying from chrome, the add-on killing and other do-not-want that's been going on in firefox, the only things I miss are 1) the ability to move the stop/reload icon to the right of the address bar and 2) the keyboard shortcut "/" for search
Reply to
Andy Burns
I dumped Firefox for Seamonkey back at release 29, when Firefox changed its user interface in ways I didn't like. I've seen no reason to change since. (Disclaimer: this is for X86_64.)
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Charlie Gibbs
Right. I may have to give it a whirl.
Shame. I been a Netscape man since Mosaic days
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
AIUI seamonkey is the continuation of the netscape suite.
Reply to
Andy Burns

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