Turnkey headless Raspberry Pi 2

Can anyone recommend a supplier for a turnkey headless Raspberry Pi 2
preinstalled with enough of Linux for me to do some program development
on it - primarily in C - without having to configure it in any way that
would need a display?
I am currently away from home and have no access to an HDMI display. So
I would like a RPi which "just works" - i.e. comes pre-installed and
which can get its IP address from a DHCP server so that I can just
telnet (preferably) or ssh (not so good) to it from a Windows laptop.
(The laptop does not have a video-in port, before someone asks.)
I want to use the Pi for software development so it would need to have
the usual development programs installed - gcc, make, ld etc. Python
could also be handy. I can download other packages but bandwidth here is
limited so it would be better if it came preinstalled with most things.
For package management I would prefer apt-get over any of the others
that I have come across.
Oh, and it would be handy if it came with Samba preinstalled so that I
can map a drive to the Pi from Windows.
I don't need a windowing system on it. Samba and telnet access is all I
would need for access to the Pi.
I could plug a USB keyboard and an ethernet cable into it and otherwise
it pretty-much has to be accessible out of the box: I would have no way
to deal with error messages on a non-existent screen.
Any recommendations?
James
Reply to
James Harris
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creating an SD card with raspian should do it
Also remember the pi has a composite video output so an older TV set could still be usable
--
"I have more information in one place than anybody in the world."   
-- Jerry Pournelle, an absurd notion, apparently about the BIX BBS
Reply to
alister
Yes. I've got a couple of headless Pi's - a display and keyboard was only needed for the initial installation and generating SSH keys, since then they're remotely accessed. Uptime on one is approaching a year...no real need to turn it off!
--
Stan Barr     plan.b@bluesomatic.org
Reply to
Stan Barr
That sounds like a standard Raspbian card to me. You can download a card image from the RaspberryPi Organisation
formatting link
or buy a preinstalled one from The Pi Hut (and probably other places too: http:// thepihut.com
Thats all included in the standard Raspbian distribution.
Its Debian based, so uses apt-get.
apt-get is your friend, but see below.
Telnet is dead, but SSH is part of the standard distro and sshd is enabled by default.
Install PuTTY on your Windows system. That provides an ssh client for non- graphical terminal sessions and scp for individual file transfers.
Download and install Filezilla on your Windows system. Its a graphical ftp and sftp client, so can do multiple file transfers via an SSH session. You may find you don't need Samba if you use this or any other FTP client that can use the sftp file transfer protocol.
Not needed. Just install PuTTY on your Windows system and be happy using your laptop's screen and keyboard.
--
martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
telnet ain't dead. You can install it if you like
+1 on that
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the  
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. ? Erwin Knoll
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
SSH daemon works out of the box, with standard username/password login (pi/raspberry). You would need an ethernet cable and dhcp router, and a way to look up or guess the pi's IP address.
Reply to
A. Dumas
OK, slight exaggeration: the telnet client is still useful for testing MTAs and other servers that accept unencrypted plain test commands.
However, I don't think the telnetd server is included in any current mainline Linux distros. Without it you can't use telnet to login and run a console session.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
Slackware
nb
Reply to
notbob
It's included in Debian Jessie (Debian 8, testing, next stable whatever you call it).
~$ aptitude show telnetd Package: telnetd State: not installed Version: 0.17-36 Priority: optional Section: net Maintainer: Alberto Gonzalez Iniesta Architecture: amd64 Uncompressed Size: 160 k Depends: adduser, openbsd-inetd | inet-superserver, passwd, libc6 (>= 2.7-1) Conflicts: suidmanager (< 0.50), suidmanager (< 0.50), telnetd Replaces: netstd, netstd Provides: telnet-server Description: The telnet server The in.telnetd program is a server which supports the DARPA telnet interactive communication protocol.
Tags: admin::login, interface::daemon, network::server, protocol::ipv6, protocol::telnet, role::program, use::login
I don't have access to a raspbian system now, but I'm convinced that raspbian includes the telnetd package too.
Regards,
Kees.
--
Kees Theunissen.
Reply to
Kees Theunissen
It does: I'm somewhat shocked that something so lacking in security (no encryption of anything including passwords, no authentication so man-in- middle attacks will not be detected and known vulns in telnetd) should be deprecated at the very least.
RedHat distros, i.e. Fedora, still supports the telnet client but dropped all support for the telnetd server several years back. I'd assumed that the other major distributions and their clones would have done the same.
You can probably still find the source relatively easily and compile it yourself if you *really* need the server. If you can do that you probably understand the risks of using it, but I still wonder why you'd want to when ssh does such a good job and Kermit is more flexible and configurable than either telnet or ssh.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
Depends what you mean by included. Its on all my debian servers - the ones that aren't accessible except from my own networks..:-)
I had to explicitly install it mind
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the  
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. ? Erwin Knoll
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
sometimes all you want is a boring lightweight simple vt100 console.
X windows is far more flexible and configurable than telnet kermit or SSH...
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the  
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. ? Erwin Knoll
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Kermit is the rolls-royce answer there. It's not just for serial lines: it was network-capable since about v 6.x (its at 9.x now) and can emulate one type of terminal to match the remote system's expectations and use different type for its user-facing interactions, i.e. I used to use it from am xterm logon on my local box to talk to an OS-9 system that thought it was dealing with a Wyse-120 terminal. And on top of that its scriptable and does file transfers. These can automatically handle newline conversions, fix differing filename lengths, etc.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
I meant in the RedHat Fedora sense of can't and won't install telnetd.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
WTF use is any of that since the Pi already has a bash shell for scripting and a samba server for file transfers, or ftp?
Kermit made sense at the far end of a 2400 baud modem, but its useless if you have a TC IP link
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the  
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. ? Erwin Knoll
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
I am not aware that it has either been denied installation or even removed, from any repositories.
It just isn't included by default, which is fair enough - if it popped up unannounced and working that would be a mild security hazard if you hadn't set up iptables first.
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the  
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. ? Erwin Knoll
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
You might choose not to use it for file transfer, but its a rather good way of running commands over a TCP/IP network, especially if the program you want to run expects more than a glass teletype but you have no way of telling it to issue terminal commands for the screen you're sitting at.
As I said, you may be sitting at an xterm, but if the program can only use, say, a vt100, you tell Kermit to emulate a vt100 for the remote host and all is good: the editor, termcap program or whatever sends vt100 codes which kermit converts into xterm codes to paint your screen.
I've used it a lot, both over my local LAN and on serial connections to talk to a (now sadly defunct) OS-9 box that only had 9600 baud serial connections.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
If you have to use the Windows abomination, WinSCP is a nice way of moving files between it and your GNU/Linux boxen.
formatting link
Reply to
Hils
Satellite CCRMA (been meaning to mention it here. I've used fedora/PlanetCCRMA on a desktop for several years) is set up to use headless out of the box. Per their web site (
formatting link
):
"Satellite CCRMA is a platform for building embedded musical instruments and embedded art installations."
"Comes with Pure Data extended, Arduino, Faust, ChucK, Emacs, g++/gcc, and more..."
The pi assumes ip 192.168.105.106, they say assign youself 192.168.105.105 manually, use a ethernet cable direct from the computer to the pi & use putty for ssh. Course you'd only have to do this once to set up DHCP &c if you need to.
Ron
Reply to
colonel_hack
^^^^^^^^^^^^^
it's in the repository, but not installed by default...
Bye Jack
--
Yoda of Borg am I! Assimilated shall you be! Futile resistance is, hmm?
Reply to
Jack

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