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There aretwo of us who are conduting Raspberry Piclasses of all sorts  
(usage, interfacing, coding, etc) to a retirement village. Each class  
member has their own Pi and are doing quite well considering they  
never used acomputer riorto tis series of classes.

One question popped up the other day when we were installing samba on  
their systems.  One gentleman asked "how do you know what programs  
are in this library so you know what to install?  The other  
instructor and I looked at each other and couldn't come up with  
ananswer except it was by articles, or hearsay from others.

So I will ask the more linux literate ones here how do you get a ist  
of the apps and programs availabe for installation?  I've looked at  
apt-get and its parameters, but I have had no luck at all.  I do not  
profess to be an expert in the Raspbian system, so if I could run a  
comand to get a list of info for the programs, I could proess the  
output list to pull just thre bae bones info for the library entries.

can someone provide some help with this effort?

Thanks for your attention.

John Carter

Re: Libraries
On 9.5.20 09:11, John Carter wrote:
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If you mean a list of packages in the Raspbian repository, the
'Add/Remove Software' window on the Raspbian desktop shows a
listing, organized by categories.

For a tool for bare console, aptitude does the same.

There are tens of thousands of packages in the repo, please
be prepared for quite a haystack for the needle.

--  

-TV


Re: Libraries
On Sat, 09 May 2020 10:11:56 +0300, Tauno Voipio wrote:

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And using the package manager means it will install any dependencies at  
the same time so you should not have to install any extra packages first.

The question is technically unnecessary but does show the student is  
actually thinking about what they are doing rather than following blindly.
This is an excellent start & they should do really well  




--  
If we all work together, we can totally disrupt the system.

Re: Libraries
As raspbian is based on debian then:

https://packages.debian.org/index

is a pretty full answer to the question "what is available" and for
any package what the dependencies will be.  It is comprehensive but I
am not sure it is easy or beginner friendly. It is still not quite
complete because there are also packages out there that require
building from source and those are not included in that list. There
are also things like pi-hole and pi-vpn which are packages with pi
specific configuration wrappers for standard packages.

For a more friendly list of programs or applications then a general
starter is to google something like "linux applications list" to get
links like:
https://www.techradar.com/uk/best/best-linux-apps
https://itsfoss.com/best-ubuntu-apps/
https://www.fossmint.com/awesome-linux-software/
https://itsfoss.com/essential-linux-applications/
The range is still extensive and bewildering but is at least more or
less by task.

For your class a curated list of one example from each common
application type maybe more useful.

MArtin


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Re: Libraries
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Other people have answer the question as asked.

But it?s the wrong question. If you actually want to solve some specific
problem, you don?t get a gigantic list and look through it looking for
something that addresses that problem, you use Google (or another search
engine, if you prefer) and see what you can find.

--  
https://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/

Re: Libraries
On 05/09/2020 01:11 AM, John Carter wrote:
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Speaking as a septuagenarian Linux user who has just started exploring  
the Raspberry Pi, I suspect that you "heard" a slightly different  
question than the one your students are asking.

The question is more like "What can Raspberry Pi do for me today?"

The closest I've seen debian.org come is  
https://packages.debian.org/stable/ . It is too fine grained - doubt  
they are interested specifically in Lisp, Perl, TeX etc.



Re: Libraries
On 09/05/2020 12:18, Richard Owlett wrote:
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well a good start is something like synaptic.But that was always the  
weak part of Unix and Linux documentation. Told you everything to make a  
program do what you wanted except what the program actually did, and  
where to find it.



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--  
Gun Control: The law that ensures that only criminals have guns.

Re: Libraries
On Sat, 09 May 2020 06:11:15 +0000, John Carter wrote:

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Web search to find package names, followed by  

aptitude search package-name     # to find package and its friends

aptitude show   package-name     # to find out more about the package  

then either  

aptitude install package...

or  

apt-get install package...

And...  
You're probably teaching your students to use man pages
but don't forget to show them how to use the commands  

apropos locate which  


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org


Re: Libraries

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To all who responded, thank you.  I knew there were a lot of packages  
out there and I will have to think about if I want to delve into the  
whole thing or not.

I do know there are better questions for this response, but one of  
our goals is to keep our answers and topics at their level and work  
from there.  This experience of instructing retirees has been  
entertaining and challenging at the same time.  Your answers to  
questions such as these are a great help to us in dealing with senior  
citizens who are trying to learn new technology.  I myself am 75, but  
retired from Control Data Corporation  a long time ago, so it makes  
it even more interesting.  Thanks agin for your support.

It does however provide some food for thought as to how his could be  
used in a learning experience for all of us old geezers.

Re: Libraries
On 09/05/2020 06:38 pm, John Carter wrote:
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First computer I worked with was a CDC 7600 at Manchester University (1971).


--  

Chris Elvidge, England

Re: Libraries
On Sat, 09 May 2020 19:09:50 +0100, Chris Elvidge wrote:

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I can trump you there: Elliott 503 at Victoria University of Wellington  
in (I think) the summer of 1966/67 and than ICL 1900s from 1968.


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org


Re: Libraries
On Sat, 09 May 2020 23:08:11 +0000, Martin Gregorie wrote:

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 > I can trump you there: Elliott 503 at Victoria University of Wellington
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Double trump: Ferranti Mercury at Manchester University (1959).




Re: Libraries
On 10/05/2020 03:20 am, Jack Fearnley wrote:
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It wasn't meant to be a game of who's been working longer, it was just  
aimed at John Carter who worked for CDC to prove that some of us  
remember the days when CDC built the biggest and fastest.

Jack, did you work on the (I think) MU2, precursor to ICL 2900 series?
I remember being shown this in all its point-to-point wiring glory.


--  

Chris Elvidge, England

Re: Libraries
On Sun, 10 May 2020 11:50:11 +0100, Chris Elvidge wrote:

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.

I took my undergraduate degree in mathematics at Manchester graduating in  
1960. During the Easter vacation in 1959 I took a two week course in the  
Electrical Engineering department on the Ferranti Mercury.

We learned the concepts of programming and used PIG (Paginator Index  
Generator) which was their version of assembler, and Autocode which was a  
higher level language.  Everything had to be punched on paper tape and  
there were tricky ways of correcting the physical tpes to correct the  
inevitable bugs.

On the basis of this course I managed to get a Summer job with the  
industrial division of the Atomic Energy Authority which had a Ferranti  
Mercury.

Subsequent to my graduation I moved to Canada and so lost all contact  
with Manchester and Ferranti.

I went on to program IBM650, 1401, 1410, 7094, CDC6600 all in the 1960's.  
After that I moved into management and things got less interesting :-)

Best Regards,
             Jack Fearnley



Re: Libraries
On Sun, 10 May 2020 02:20:19 +0000, Jack Fearnley wrote:

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Ok , lets go for the win here - anyone work on a LEO? (Way before my time  
I wasn't even born then & I am not exactly a youngster any more)



--  
"Open Channel D..."
        -- Napoleon Solo, The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

Re: Libraries
On 10/05/2020 03:06 pm, Alister wrote:
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Yes, someone did!


--  

Chris Elvidge, England

Re: Libraries
On Sun, 10 May 2020 14:06:25 +0000, Alister wrote:

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No, but I knew someone who worked on the Ace Pilot and was part of the NPL  
team who built one of the first packet-switch networks and may have  
beaten Vint Cerf to it: he was at the pre Arpanet meeting when the NPL  
team described their packet switching system. IIRC he said their network  
was running by then.  
  

--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org


Re: Libraries

<<<<<snip>>>>>
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My tenure with CDC was 1968 to 1991.

I was a field analyst working at Cape Canaveral optomizing the Real-
Time Computer system software that tracked any vehicle launched from  
The Cape.  I had the opportunity to watch my software arm and  
destruct a few Delta rockets that went out of safety envelope. I had  
the blockhouse duty for the Apollo 7,8,9,10 and 11. I was one of  
those guys in a white shirt and undone tie sitting at a console that  
monitored the range radar data.  It was fun and exciting.  
 I also did consulting at the Deep Underwater Torpedo Test Range on  
Andros Island working with the Royal Navy.

In December 1968, I was sent to Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin where  
Seymore Cray was doig the final trsting on  7600 S/n 1 for both  
hardware and software.  I was running some benchmarks for Florida  
State University on the 7600. The software was setup with a six-pack  
of PPU s in a unit record configuration feeding the CPU and it was  
one user at a time, make your run, et the output and find a place to  
evaluate it until you make corrections and got back in line.  I had a  
code from FSU that ran on their 6400, but for some reason would not  
compile error-free.  I tried several times and finally threw the  
listing into a trash barrel with great gusto.  Well Cray saw this and  
asked what the problem was.  I dug the listing out of the barrel and  
showed him.  He said that's not right, something is wrong here ther's  
nothing wrong with that syntax. He called a guy over to look at the  
problem.  This guy had a big beer belly, and a worn sport coat with  
worn leather patches on the elbows.  He introduced himself as Garner  
McCrossen who I was told later by one of the ther workers ther to be  
the world's foremost xpert in Fortran compilers.  anyway he scratched  
his head and looked at a couple of listings and then halted the  
merry-go-round and did some patching nd things were fine.But I was  
overwhelmed to have had some encounter with two major players in the  
industry.

Sorry to ramble, but your 7600 brought back this memory for me.

Re: Libraries
Op 19-6-2020 04:00, John Carter wrote:
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Fantastic, thanks.

Re: Libraries
On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 11:20:28 +0200

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Ditto!
Always pleased to hear tales of this sort of thing - helps get today's
software and hardware problems in focus :)

--  
W J G


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