How to realize a 'serial server' (with com port emulation on pc Windows) ?

Does conserver provide a Windows COMx: driver? I didn't see one ...
Reply to
Andy Burns
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Rs232 electric level in not necessary Conversion ttl-rs232 is not necessary Gpio port of Rasperry is connected directly with other 3v3 electronic boards The part for me obscure, is how to use Raspberry uart port for communication via tcp ethernet line The second big question is how to use for a 'virtual com port' on Windows side, that mus communicate with Raspberry board Please see the following link
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Reply to
RobertoA
I cannot fully understand how to use the example code described, but it seems to me very useful to realize what I would like to achieve How to use this code on Raspberry board?
Reply to
RobertoA
The description seems to be what I need How do you get it?
Reply to
RobertoA
Why ignore the uarts provided on the gpio connector?
Reply to
RobertoA
Il 31/12/2020 00:52, Dennis Lee Bieber ha scritto:
Yes, I would like to use the uarts on the Raspberry connector and 'send/receive' via the internet to a Windows PC that must 'display' the comX ports
Reply to
RobertoA
What do you mean when you refer to 'conserver'?
Reply to
RobertoA
Ok thanks, now I'm looking for ser2net
Reply to
RobertoA
netcat - aka. nc is one answer.
Its a standard Linux utility program. Its usable in shell scripts which in turn can be run a cron jobs. See its manpage for details. Among other things it can copy a data stream from a serial port to a network socket or vice versa.
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
ok
That's the fairly easy part, as several people have linked different ways
There are several bit of software that do half of what you want, but not all of it e.g. look at com0com, maybe com2tcp does actually do what you need?
Reply to
Andy Burns
Because a USB serial adapter is ready to run off the shelf and uses standard RS-232 levels, character encoding, parity and stop bits on its serial side, which is compatible with most items with serial connections, e.g. puck-type GPS receivers.
The ones sold by PICAXE have the USP blug on the body with a serial cable terminated by a 3.5mm 3-wire jackplug. Most other converters seem to come with a D9 socket (male or female - you choose) on the converter body and
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
On 31 Dec 2020 02:14:44 GMT, A. Dumas declaimed the following:
Most of the hardware I've had to interface with has required RS-232 levels. In truth, the only serial port device I have that did not need RS-232 levels is a Kenwood R-5000 receiver -- and in its day a 5V TTL to RS-232 level shifter was a separate accessory or something one had to build in order to control it. Kenwood finally put real RS-232 ports on the TS-570/590/2000 rigs.
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	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/
Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber
On Thu, 31 Dec 2020 10:29:02 +0000, Andy Burns declaimed the following:
Looking at the documentation I doubt it... It appears to be Linux specific (unless one can build "console" client on Windows).
It does not appear to grant passthrough access to arbitrary UARTs. Instead it appears to mirror system (login) consoles to remote systems.
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	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/
Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber
Do you /need/ (raw) Ethernet specifically? Or are you simply wanting the ability to use a physical serial port on one computer from another computer across a network (be it Ethernet, WiFi, PPP, etc.)?
There is a standard that has been used in the past: RFC 2217 - Telnet Com Port Control Option. It is an extension to the telnet protocol to allow controlling various aspects about the serial port across the network from the client.
It's been about 15 years since I've used this. But the last time I did so, I installed one of the handful of programs that supported RFC 2217 on a Linux machine, and a separate / independent client program on a Windows VM that also supported RFC 2217. The client made a virtual COM port on Windows that any program could use just like a physical COM port. The only caveat was some programs didn't know how to deal with COM ports numbered higher than 4.
I've messed with a few different RFC 2217 servers for Linux. I remember messing with a couple of different RFC 2217 clients for Windows. One was free and limited function. Another was a reasonable price to license with more functions. The names of all of them have long since been lost to me.
Search for things related to RFC 2217. I think that will get you close to what you want.
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Grant. . . . 
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Reply to
Grant Taylor
Den 2020-12-31 kl. 21:38, skrev RobertoA:
Hmm, if you don't see that, then it is not for you. Basically you adapt the code for your purposes. You assign values to variables port client_ip if you want a white list - otherwise remove that if-section tty
then add a dbg proc like (or remove calls to dbg) proc dbg {what } { puts $what }
then you run it via tclsh (I think it is installed in raspbian else sudo apt install tcl)
The filevent does the rest
But as others have pointed out - nc/netcat does the job as well If you are not a programmer - then that is a better route. If you needs are more special - then use something you can adapt yourself - like above
Reply to
Björn Lundin
It's in the RaspberryPi OS package system (which is based on debian) ...
On the rapsberry pi ...
sudo apt-get install ser2net
It will probably have a man page that describes the software. Again on the raspberry pi ...
man ser2net
Reply to
Jim Jackson
For example this here (UART TTL to Ethernet)
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or read here
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Reply to
Deloptes
But I think he really wants com2tcp for windows instead of ser2net ?
Reply to
Andy Burns
I already use the module with two uart
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But there is no equivalent module for 6 uart
Reply to
RobertoA

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