How do I shut down Raspbian with the keyboard but no monitor?

If I've got Raspbian running with a keyboard but no monitor, how do I
shut it down with that keyboard?
Solutions for shutting down from either the unlogged-in terminal or the
desktop (or preferably both) would be appreciated.
Reply to
Ed Davies
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From the terminal mode: press Ctrl-Alt-Del on the keyboard.
This is configured in /etc/inittab:
# What to do when CTRL-ALT-DEL is pressed. ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now
From the desktop: it depends on what desktop software.
Reply to
Rob
Sorry, I don't understand the instructions. What does the first bit mean for example? ca:12345? ca? Do you mean type a colon or is that just your indication of a separator? What does that do with no app running?
The ctrl-alt-del brings up the task manager and I can see that the text gets typed in at the bottom right, but disappears after a second or so. I can't type that stuff in _with_ a monitor.
Reply to
Ed Davies
Never mind. Got it. I got confused first trying your instructions at the terminal, then when that didn't work at the desktop. I must've mistyped the first time round. Thanks.
Reply to
Ed Davies
You do not need to do anything with those lines except verify that indeed they are there in /etc/inittab.
When you hit ctrl-alt-del the system will run /sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now
When you want to know how that works and what else you can do, type: man inittab
Reply to
Rob
I'll add for the benefit of anybody as confused as I was:
edit /etc/innitab and find this line:
ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now
then change the -r to -h
then just do ctrl-alt-del in terminal mode (the change isn't effective until it's rebooted once). It now shuts down instead of rebooting.
I'm not sure what -a or -t1 does since that's not in man shutdown or shutdown --help.
Reply to
Ed Davies
-a means it will consult /etc/shutdown.allow if present, to see who is allowed to shutdown.
-t1 is related to timing during the shutdown.
You are right, when you want it to remain off after Ctrl-Alt-Del you can use -h instead of -r, else it will reboot. (normally I just pull the power when it wants to reboot, at least then you have done a clean shutdown)
Reply to
Rob
Changes to /etc/inittab become effective immediately if you type init q (as root or using sudo)
Reply to
Dom
Yes, I can just recycle the power for reboot, but it would be nice to have hotkeys for shutdown _and_ reboot. Google only seems to turn up people asking the same question but no solution:
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Reply to
Ed Davies
one quick option would be to change the program run to a simple script that waits for another key-press & then calls the correct variant. I may experiment with this later if i get the time.
another option is the SysRq key which has various options if enabled correctly (google linux SysRq)
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Reply to
alister
Sounds good. Grabbing the keyboard is the hard bit I guess.
Reply to
Ed Davies
Op Sun, 19 Oct 2014 09:22:56 +0000 (UTC) schreef Ed Davies:
info shutdown describes what -a and -t1 do.
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Coos 

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Reply to
Coos Haak
to be honest i think the SYSRq key is what you want
it enables you to flush buffers, shut down or kill all processes, halt or reboot the system & it is built in at the kernel level.
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Reply to
alister
Another option is to have something that runs halt or shutdown when it sees one of the GPIO pins change state. I have an app which runs on the Pi and it using the GPIO pins anyway, without any keyboard or display. So I have the app monitor a spare i/o port* which has a 'HALT' button connected to it, and it fires off a configurable command, such as "(sync; sync; sync; poweroff)&" Of course, this only works if the app itself is working at the time.
*
In my case this isn't directly one of the Pi's GPIO pins but an SPI expansion i/o port. However, you could do it with one of the Pi's GPIO pins and a suitable program.
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Andrew Gabriel 
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Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
If you have spare GPIO pins, you can wire buttons to it to do that and use a simple shell script to monitor/control. Shorting one of the I2C lines to 0v will reboot a halted Pi too.
Gordon
Reply to
Gordon Henderson

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