Flash

Newbie to Raspberry but not Linux.
Does Raspberry Pi have a working Flash or is that too
processor intensive for a RPi?
Reply to
Wayne Chirnside
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If you mean Adobe Flash, not available for ARM, apparently:
Reply to
Mel Wilson
But considering the security situation, you're probably better off without it.
(I belive the Pi browsers will handle HTML5, which gives you your videos and such without needing Flash.)
Reply to
Roger Bell_West
Yeah I was aware of the disadvantages of Flash so it's all good.
Next month I'll be blackout proof. Twelve volt monitor, RPi, 12 volt router and 12 Volt digital amplifier.
All that remains is to wire up a wiring harness and order some stout batteries.
Bit of an internet addict so if the lights go out in hurricane season I'm ready ;-)
Reply to
Wayne Chirnside
Den 2015-10-25 kl. 23:24, skrev Wayne Chirnside:
It's possible to get Flash working in Raspbian on Raspberry Pi 2 by using Chromium and a Pepper Flash plugin, see
formatting link

It works well for Spotify and Scratch 2, and less demanding Flash-applications.
Reply to
M.O.B. i L.
Thank you. I _may_ look into this. I am also going to run Windows ten on a second Pi 2 and likely various linux incarnations on two or three other Pi's.
Reply to
Wayne Chirnside
But your ISP will be down.
Last time we had a major storm around here both my ISP and my cell phone provider were down for a day or so. Funny, people around here seem to think this sort of thing is inevitable. It's not that hard to make wireless comms hard enough to take 60 MPH winds and ice. Well, maybe not the ice. Seems the antenna don't work so well with an inch of ice on them.
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
WTFDTM?
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
By most accounts it's not very exciting.
Reply to
Rob Morley
... for some undefined value of 'exciting'. It is however likely to be 'interesting' (in the Chinese interpretation of the word).
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W J G
Reply to
Folderol
Out of curiosity, were landlines in your neighbourhood still working? I'd expect that they were down too if your local telco still puts the line up a pole but should have been just fine if it uses underground cabling.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
POTS is veryt resilient to storms even up poles
--
Global warming is the new Margaret Thatcher. There is no ill in the  
world it's not directly responsible for.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Don't know. I haven't had a land line here for a decade or more. The storm didn't take down the local power lines. But we loose electric service a lot in bad weather. The only time I recall things being very bad was a storm (remnant of a hurricane) that did take down the local power lines. This happened everywhere of course so it was a week or so before power was restored and I'm sure land lines too.
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
Yeah, how does that work exactly?
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
been just fine if it uses underground
Speaking for myself when I had a land line I never lost that even the year we had four hurricanes back to back.
Reply to
Mark Justice
Batteries and generatoirs in te exhanges
--
Global warming is the new Margaret Thatcher. There is no ill in the  
world it's not directly responsible for.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Up to a point. In the USA these days, many landlines will go down after ~24 hours without external power because the equivalent of the street cab has exhausted its backup battery.
Reply to
Roger Bell_West
It figures when you think about it: small diameter telephone wires that can be strung rather tighter between the poles than power lines. That means the wire won't thrash around so much in the wind. Being smaller diameter the drag, and the resulting wind load on the wires will be less. But the wires are still relatively thick compared with insulated copper, so power will most likely still get to subscriber kit even if the wires get damaged but not actually broken. Last but not least, even if poles move so the wires get slack enough to touch and give momentary shorts, the voltage is low enough that this won't break the wires.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie

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