Firefox

I was meaning back when it was the hot replacement for Cello (IIRC that was the first graphical web browser), was known as "Netscape Navigator" and was maintained by the US Supercomputer Centre - some years before Mozilla was a thing.
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Martin    | martin at 
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Martin Gregorie
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On Wed, 8 May 2019 23:57:05 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@telling.you.invalid (Computer Nerd Kev) declaimed the following:
RPI3B/B+ are ARMv8-A (64&32 bit), as is the v1.2 RPI2B. RPI2B original is ARMv7 (32 bit). RPI3A+ is ARMv8 (64 bit).
I believe the desired architecture for builds should be armhf though armel may run, if slower. armhf assumes 32-bit hardware floating point unit, which the RPI does have (and since Raspbian, at least, is a common build for all, it is running in 32-bit mode even on the quad-core 64-bit RPI3-series). armel has to emulate floating point operations.
Mount a USB hard-drive and configure the system to use it for swap space -- it will be slow, but might allow native building -- especially on a 3B(+).
FYI:
md_admin@microdiversity:~$ uname -a Linux microdiversity 4.14.98-v7+ #1200 SMP Tue Feb 12 20:27:48 GMT 2019 armv7l GNU/Linux
That's a NOOBS/Raspbian (Debian Stretch) install
md_admin@microdiversity:~$ apt-cache search firefox firefox-esr - Mozilla Firefox web browser - Extended Support Release (ESR)
So
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install firefox-esr
should suffice.
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	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com
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Dennis Lee Bieber
On FF 66.0.4 (on Windows) and on FF 52.9.0 (on Ras Pi)(, Bookmarks | Show All Bookmarks | Import and Backup | Backup only offers one file format to save as: JSON. There is no mention of saving as HTML.
I copy the JSON file from my master PC to the slave ones and import from it to keep the list of bookmarks up to date.
Reply to
NY
On 09/05/2019 00:57, Computer Nerd Kev wrote:> You can if you're running a Linux distro which is compatible with
The Pi is armhf.
---druck
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druck
Use Show All Bookmarks. On the resulting page, under Import and Backup, choose Export Bookmarks to HTML. (I'm using FF 66.0.5 on Windows 10.)
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Dave Underwood
I see, as I've been looking at Pi Zero stuff, I got the impression that they were all ARM V.6, but I guess it's just that a lot of the software is built to be compatible with ARM V.6 as a common minimum spec.
Noted though that _I_ would still want armel with my Pi Zero W, As it has the same BCM2835 chip (ARM V.6) used in the original (pre RPI2) Pis. armhf is apparantly for ARM V.7:
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Reply to
Computer Nerd Kev
On linux mint Firefox (66.0.3) offers HTML import and *export* to HTML...
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
So does 66.0.4 but, unlike 66.0.3, it doesn't invalidate your add-ons - for the Fedora build anyway.
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Martin    | martin at 
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Martin Gregorie
yes. Its odd. I am riunning two different versions of mint here and one is on 66.0.4 and the other 66.0.3...and this 66.0.3 did NOT invalidate addons.
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The Natural Philosopher
Thanks. I hadn't spotted that menu item. Odd that Firefox chose to put the two export mechanisms in different places, rather than Import and Backup | Backup offering both JSON and HTML in the same drop-down of Save As. The distinction between backup and export is a bit too subtle in my opinion: they are both mechanisms of saving the bookmarks as files in one format or another.
Reply to
NY
True, but probably unimportant (as Gag Halfunt would say).
That's "Backup", you can also "Export bookmarks to HTML" (from the same menu). At least, that's the case on Firefox ESR 52.9 on Windows and Firefox ESR 60.6.1 on AMD64 Debian.
That works too ...
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Cheers, 
 Daniel.
Reply to
Daniel James
I rather thought you were ... and my tongue was firmly in my cheek (hence the string of punctuation suggestive of a smile) ... but the fact remains that Firefox is the natural descendant of Navigator. It's been rewritten once or twice, but it's the same codebase (at least in spirit).
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Cheers, 
 Daniel.
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Daniel James
I lost touch with it as soon as Opera appeared and stayed with that until it imploded, took a look at Vivaldi, which I've never liked, and so ended up with FF until they started to do dumb things to the screen layout and PaleMoon appeared. Used that until it seemed to fold its tents and vanish a year or three back and went back to FF.
Now Pale Moon is back in contention, the only reason I'm not running that is that I prefer FF's Ghostery, uBlock Origin and Cookie Autodelete to Pale Moon's Adblock Lattitude and Cookies Exterminator.
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Martin    | martin at 
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Martin Gregorie
On Thu, 9 May 2019 23:27:56 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@telling.you.invalid (Computer Nerd Kev) declaimed the following:
ARM v6 actually is /newer/ than ARM v7.
NO ARM core has built-in floating point -- it is an extension that can be specified when designing a chip using ARM cores. You'd have to check the data sheet for the chip to determine if the designer included the floating point unit. Most v7 and v6 based chips tend to have the hardware floating point.
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""" ARMv6 architecture Includes VFPv2 optionally (usually is implemented).
ARMv7 architecture Includes VFPv3 optionally (usually is implemented). VFPv3 brings several minor improvements. Mainly it adds a new capabilities to instructions VCVT and VMOV. Some operations with floating point values can run more efficiently because of the improvement. """ (VFP => Vector Floating Point)
v6 has Thumb-1 -- the processor has to be switched between full instruction set and compressed Thumb instruction set. v7 supports Thumb-2, in which full 32-bit instructions and compressed 16-bit Thumb-2 instructions can be intermixed without an explicit mode change.
v6 does not have the single-precision NEON SIMD engine. v7 may have NEON, which could be useful for 2D/3D graphics processing.
Buried in the bottom of that link appear the key phrase... At least for Debian-provided releases it implies armhf /also uses Thumb-2/, which is not available for v6 -- so needs the armel build. Though the Debian site indicates that armhf also needs VFPv3.
BUT -- if one compiles the OS for themselves, one might be able to compile without Thumb instructions, but still using VFP -- that compile would be usable on both v6 and v7 chips, and hence qualify as an armhf type build.
So the question becomes: what does "Raspbian" (via NOOBS) contain. After all, the R-Pi foundation seems to release only a single OS installer file, regardless of architecture (I'm still hoping they eventually split off an optional 64-bit Raspbian). I know for a fact (just ran it) that apt-get is getting armhf files for my 3B
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	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com
Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber
And I thought this was already getting confusing just with the ARM version numbers. So to summarise: V.6 may have many (but not all) of the features of V.7 as extended features. The Debian armel builds do not use the floating point features of the ARM V.6 CPUs used in the PRI1/0. The armhf builds do, but also enable some of the ARM V.7 features not available for ARM V.6, so they might crash sometimes.
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Reply to
Computer Nerd Kev
Or you could read the Debian explanation of ARM ports as Raspbian is built on Debian.
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It explains it all.
Reply to
mm0fmf
Oops! That should be "Gag Halfrunt", as I'm sure you all knew.
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 Daniel.
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Daniel James
On Sat, 11 May 2019 09:18:23 +0100, mm0fmf declaimed the following:
It clarifies nothing with regards to Raspbian. It only indicates that the debian.org provided ports are armhf for v7 architecture, and armel for older, along with a 64-bit build.
""" Other ports to ARM hardware exist / have existed in and around Debian - see the wiki for more links and an overview. """
Raspbian could be based upon the sources of any of the debian.org ports, but using a different set of compiler options. All of my R-Pis are 3B and 3B+ versions. Since Raspbian (via NOOBS) is a single image, is it armel, or armhf? And if it is armel, why does apt-get update retrieve indexes for armhf packages?
Now, this
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DOES answer the question...
""" There are or have-been at least two unofficial ports outside the Debian infrastructure.
Raspbian - Uses the hard-float version of the "new" ABI (EABI) like Debian armhf but targets v6 rather than v7. Currently tracks Debian jessie and stretch. Primarily but not exclusively targeted at the Raspberry Pi. GNU Triplet: arm-linux-gnueabihf """
So... Raspbian is not a formal debian.org port, and is built with different options from Debian sources.
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	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com
Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber
Well you learn something every day.
Reply to
mm0fmf
Just like Grandfather's axe.
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Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:\>WIN                                     | A better way to focus the sun 
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Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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