Did some of us start this way? :)

Some of you may get something out of this.

formatting link

--
"I\'m never wrong, once i thought i was, but was mistaken"
Real Programmers Do things like this.
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Jamie
Loading thread data ...

Of course, I avow to it on my website. ;-)

Tim

-- Deep Fryer: A very philosophical monk. Website @

formatting link

Reply to
Tim Williams

Did I hear that right?

"...an extreme intuition about of all things mechanical and electrical and....utter social ineptitude."

I started with the 75 in 1 Radio Shack electronics kit.

Now I can't see the tiny parts, my circuits 'blow up' graphically in spice, my test equipment is not fast enough and I still find everything difficult. :P

D from BC

Reply to
D from BC

Yeah, yeah, yeah. I got a 101 in 1 electronics starter kit for my birthday, when I was 13 and the damn thing was broken to start with. But it gave me parts to play with. Ended up raiding the junk pile behind a TV rapair shop for more parts, and building whatever hit my interest. Got a job with a major competitor with Big Blue a year out of high school, and made my reputation for finding weird bugs and always having the last of whatever small part it was someone wanted in my toolkit. During one meeting on cutting Code A costs (for overnight shipping of parts), my boss actually told everyone that if they needed a B-list item (counted by the handfull) to get a machine up and running but there weren't any in stock, "Call Dave. He'll have it."

Yeah, I got spanked for taking the phone apart. And if they had let me put it back together it would have saved them a pretty penny.

Love the video. Thanks.

Dave

Reply to
Dave

Dave snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com posted to sci.electronics.design:

I think i got started at about 6, i was reassembling clocks that ran correctly or even kept correct backwards time when i was 8. I got my

101 in 1 kit with a tube when i was 10 for christmas, i was already a gonner by then.
Reply to
JosephKK

I saw a math for kids article on how to make a half-adder out of relays, and I already knew how to make a relay from a dry-cell battery, and some scraps of metal, wood, and wire. I started designing an electric adding machine which morphed eventually into a Tic-Tac-Toe game machine. The whole project came to a hlat when I realized that my design req

Reply to
Richard Henry

(I don't even know what key I hit to do the send in middle of typing command. I hate google groups. I'm going back to my other reader, even if it doesn't include sci.physics)

Back to what I was typing when I so rudely interrupted myself: The whole project came to a halt when I relaized that my design would need a dry cell battery at every relay.

As

Reply to
Richard Henry

Geezz...you may be in the process of a stroke...call 911, take an aspirin, and wait the 90 minutes it takes them to arrive...

Reply to
Fred Bloggs
[snip]

Maybe in Virginia. When I had a garage fire a few years ago... dumb painter dumped oily rags into a garbage can... it could be measured in seconds between the neighbors pounding on the front door... "we called

9-1-1"... and their arrival.

...Jim Thompson

--
|  James E.Thompson, P.E.                           |    mens     |
|  Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Jim Thompson

On a sunny day (Sat, 24 Nov 2007 15:17:52 -0800 (PST)) it happened "Ken S. Tucker" wrote in :

I started I dunno how, connecting some headphones to the radio in the livingroom... then this book:

formatting link
'Zo werkt de radio' = 'That is how radio works', by E Aisberg. Maybe I was 5 or six, immediately followed by 'Zo werkt de TV' = 'That is how television works', from the same author. His books are incredible, he would just explain things in a simple way with electrons, getting quite advanced too. Sure in a way his way of thinking set mine, in those early years. Then I started gathering stuff and build a receiver, radio transmitter, maybe at 8. Then not much with electronics, wanted to be a jet pilot... that did not happen (humanity was saved) and then, was mysteriously drawn to TV again, ended up working there. But E. Aisberg's book must have somehow layed the foundation. Those books are absolutely still worth reading, note that one the 12th unchanged print!

Reply to
Jan Panteltje

Jamie hath wroth:

Nice. That's me in the 1960's.

I learned electronics by dumpster diving for dead radio and TV chassis from the back of TV repair shops and the local radio supply houses (Henry Radio in Smog Angeles). I would cannibalize the parts, build something that never worked, and drag it to the skool electronics shop to get some help with the troubleshooting. Transformers were too heavy to take on the bus, so AC-DC transformerless designs were my favorite. The electronics shop instructor said I was destined for great things, if I survived my own contrivances. I eventually understood what he meant when I punched myself in the eye due to yet another electric shock. Everyone assumed I had been in a fight and therefore didn't bother asking for details. My reputation was saved.

Roll forward about 40 years, and little has changed. I'm still dumpster diving, buying electronic carcasses on eBay, and dragging them to the office to fix. Some people bring home stray cats and dogs. I bring home dead electronics. It's the life of a compulsive repairman.

The relatives and neighbors have also figured out I have the knack. Fixing appliances, machinery, vehicles, and of course, computahs, is epidemic. A few days out of the hospital, and I have customers demanding I show up (dead or alive) to fix their computahs. My ladyfriend of the month usually has me do some major repairs before each date. Conversations at parties invariably degenerates into free advice on keeping Windoze alive.

Drivel: When I was in the hospital in 2002 getting an inside plumbing job, a group of rather cute nurses were getting instruction on how to operate a new echocardiogram machine. It was apparently a class, with me as the designated victim. They were having some trouble understanding what was happening, so I explained how it works, what the controls do, what to adjust for the best image, and the meaning of the various controls and buzzwords. The result was me giving a 15 minute lecture while in bed.

--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Jeff Liebermann

A couple of decades ago a small shopping center burned to the ground in my community, in part because no one called the fire in until it was well under way.

My dad was the officer in charge -- he got to be the one to make the call to pull all the firefighters out* and just protect exposures.

Afterwards, one of the neighbors said "what took you guys so long?!? We watched smoke come out of that thing for over half an hour before you showed up (the place is less than a block from the substation with the 1st responding engine). When asked "so, when did _you_ call 911?" they shut up pretty fast...

  • It had some constructional features that would have killed a few firefighters, else.
--
Tim Wescott
Control systems and communications consulting
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Tim Wescott

ALL firefighters in Phoenix are required to have EMT training. Plus the larger stations have a dedicated EMT van.

It can literally bring tears to you eyes to watch these guys in action... remarkable dedication and bravery!

...Jim Thompson

--
|  James E.Thompson, P.E.                           |    mens     |
|  Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Jim Thompson
[snip]

I was fortunate enough to grow up in my father's radio and TV repair shop, plus he provided me an account at the parts wholesaler, so I had almost anything my heart desired ;-)

...Jim Thompson

--
|  James E.Thompson, P.E.                           |    mens     |
|  Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Jim Thompson

"Jim Thompson" wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...

OK - some things here touched home. I reply out of direct knowledge.

Being involved in the Public Safety arena - I can tell you - there are some stupid people out there. One example is - there was an Accident. The 911 system has been in effect for awhile - yet the caller reporting the accident - called a phone number and left a message on an answering machine of the Volunteer Fire Station - which also states at the beginning of the message - if this is an Emergency - please hang up now and dial 911. Then, they bitched about why no one showed up. DUH!

Our stations here - "Volunteer" - have an engine out the door in 4 minutes or less. That's not bad - considering you have to drop what you're doing at home/outside to respond. This area is "all" volunteer.

In an Emergency, time "seems" to drag - when waiting for an Ambulance, Police or Fire. I know - I can be at our station waiting for a crew - my bunker gear already on - and it seems to take forever - but in reality it doesn't.

You have people who ARE overloading the system. We get calls for EMS runs for Blisters on one's butt, Diarrhea, stoved toes, etc. NOW - while we're out attending those people - and someone is having a "life threatening" emergency - guess what? Our response time is greatly hampered. People all consider "their" issue - an "emergency". Yes - to them - it "is". Many get too excited and don't rationalize things out. Contrary to that - I've also seen those who "should" have called the EMS and insisted to ignore the symptoms - and end up in dire condition.

As one example - Diarrhea - it "can" be a problem - IF they've had it for a couple days and other issues involved - leading to Dehydration... But most people with flu or other issues where Diarrhea starts - it usually subsides and no problems - resulting. The call often states - started this am - or sudden onset. That is not in itself - an emergency. Probably a virus or something you ate. Usually you don't die from it and don't require immediate care. It is these types of calls - overloading the system - the hospital being a good 15 minutes away - it takes an EMS unit out of service for someone who may actually need it.

Some parts of this area - are remote - so if you're way out in the boonies - it will take time. The roads are windy and if in winter - snow or ice on roads - we can't take a chance of killing ourselves or others to respond. Most of the fires we've "lost" - were out in the middle of no-where - with little water- aside that on the engines responding. The tankers in outter areas also take time to get there. A garage burned to the ground just last winter. We had a sudden snow storm and it laid a lot of snow down - FAST. The roads were covered - the garage - out about 10 miles from here via country roads. We all got there - the person's driveway covered and icey - made the trucks hard to get close enough - hand lines had to be hoisted - and at that - with care to avoid injury. You DO have situations which we must deal with to protect ourselves as well. The idea is - to get to the call without creating another - AND - to come back - safely - so you can do it all again.

It would be wonderful to be able to call 911 and have a Firefighter, Cop or Medic pop right there - but that is fantasy. Everyone "should" take it upon themselves to learn some basics in first aid, fire safety, personal safety. WE're undermanned - yet NO ONE wants to participate. If your area is undermanned - why not join them?

Our area isn't a high tax base - many economy sustaining factories have closed. Some towns here must rely on the State Police for assistance. THEY are so overburdened - it can take them up to a couple hours to respond to a call.

Before you blame the System - look into WHY it is like that. WHY is it being overburdened - how can you get more people to participate? Ramp up the tax base without burdening the tax payers anymore - to afford Protection? Liability insurance on a Cop - is high. To equip just "one" cop with the tools he/she needs and pay them a reasonable salary for a year - is NOT cheap. Same with Firefighters. EMS has their own issues. Ever since 9/11 - the demand has grown for training and so on. Insurance issues are coming into play now which could cut an already short number of volunteers - down even further. According to the last Stats I had seen - PA - where I live - was 85% volunteer - and of those - 50% nearing an age of not being able to perform effectively. That doesn't bode well for protection - but it seems no one gives a damned. Better to bitch than to explore resolutions.

Before you bitch about the slowness of the system - ask WHY. There "could" be an underlying cause. Yes - in "some" instances - there "could" be a legitimate complaint - which must be fixed and can be - but that doesn't apply to all. In many cases - there is no easy fix. NOT unless you start filtering out calls and not responding.

The areas with "Volunteers" - have NO CLUE - how much money they save annually over a paid station. I am NOT knocking the "Paid" guys/gals. I'm just relating the situation with volunteer departments around here - and what we do - and my knowledge of some "city" stations. My point is - the people bitch about everything and want it for nothing. Our station - does a Halloween parade with candy and cash prizes, Easter Egg Hunt, Christmas Treats with Santa and so on - EVERY year. Yet to ask for a donation to help out - the people in town will bitch about it. When one of those events nears - the question is asked "WELL - are they going to do it - WHEN?" It is so easy to demand...... Our station used to be financially stable for years - but has fallen on some tough times. We may not be able to provide those "luxuries" the public demands - much longer if we are to stay alive. I can just hear it now. THEM CHEAP BASTARDS - they don't want to do anything for this town. Forget the fact we risk our lives for them.

Hells fire - around here - WE do tree removal, baby sit situations until the correct agency can respond - usually a half hour or better, etc. The City folks don't have that issue. They have "Street" crews, and a quick response (typically) of their agencies (Electric/Gas/Water, etc) to relieve the firefighters to go back. Many of these towns can't afford "street crews". The cops are so burdened, when we have calls, WE also direct traffic at the scenes. Around here - it is safe to say - we aren't "just" a fire station. Yet - there ya go - people bitch about response. Just how much is it you want from "Volunteers"? Be glad you have them, you might find yourself shit out of luck one day if they're NOT supported.

Somewhat contradictory in nature.... we hate to hear the fire whistle blow - you never know what it is until you "actually" get there. No calls are always as they seem. What is called in - and relayed by the 911 dispatcher - isn't always what you find. I would rather answer a false alarm - than roll in to see someone losing their home. But at the same time - I'd rather not have any alarms which waste resources - at all. And I don't want to see any of our people hurt or possibly hurting an innocent bystander - responding to any call - actual alarm or not. Time is of the essence - as witnessed in those bitching about slow response - but you must be careful to not create more harm/damage/injury - than already being responded to.

One call we had just recently - "Elderly lady fell - not responsive - not breathing". THAT was the call as given to us via 911. Naturally - like your own mom or grandma - we try to get there ASAP to do what we can. It was a relief to go in and find her sitting in a chair - talking. A diabetic situation - no apparent injuries from the fall. Just feeling light headed and fell. She did get transported to the E.R. for further evaluation due to this being two days in a row for the symptoms - as was divulged in questioning her and the family. My point - this was sounding like a "tragic" call - which had a decent outcome. But no time was wasted trying to get there to revive her. We get there - wherever it is - as soon as possible. WE can't control weather or traffic situations which could hamper resonse time.

Another call - similar to this one - lady collapsed while preparing for bath. The caller brought her back via CPR instructions from a 911 dispatcher. We were activated. The woman went in and out of Cardiac arrest a couple times. When she "was" brought back - it was a feeling of having saved a life - even though she was still critical. She was released to the EMS crew - who established their IV lines, etc, and transported. She was alive when they pulled out. She didn't make it. She coded and never come back. We do NOT like those calls - unfortunately we must deal with them. WE deal with lots of situations and not many are pleasant. We live with that stuff. Bravery, is just a small part of it. There's a lot more to it. Much of what we deal with - most couldn't.

Hero? I can't speak for all - but "I" sure don't consider myself one. I do what I do - to help save a life or property. Sometimes it is a good outcome - sometimes not. I do this out of desire to help others - NOT because I want applause. I come from a family of Firefighters/EMTs/Medics. I too "was" an EMT for years - then a medic. I am currently only involved in the firefighting end and Emergency Management.

Our system isn't perfect - probably never will be. Rather than be so quick to cast blame - do your part to HELP in whatever way will alleviate the problems. If you think you have slow response now - wait until you have an all out disaster. Our county had programs set up for people - NOT in the system - to help out in times of disaster until Fire - Police - EMS could arrive - but the outcome was very poor.

You can choose to be a part of the problem or a part of the solution. Which do you prefer?

Reply to
radiosrfun

Just an FYI. Try commas instead of hyphens. It's a lot more readable.

Good tips inside, thanks.

Tim

-- Deep Fryer: A very philosophical monk. Website @

formatting link

Reply to
Tim Williams

Tim,

Thanks! Though I do try to write "correctly", sometimes I get on a roll when the situation touches home. I tend to focus more on the information than the correct punctuation. One thing I am not and don't profess to be - is an English major.

Thanks again.

Lou

Reply to
radiosrfun

You are thanking him for nothing. In composition there are many tools such as comma, hyphen, ellipsis, etc., that can be used to break the boredom of an always-the-same sentence structure. They are all valid...given to preferences by the writer. Write in your own style and enjoy it.

Someone who gets pissy about it might come to be known as A.R.

Reply to
Don Bowey

Man- why doncha write a small book about it... I live in a heavily populated county, lots of hospitals, thousands of police, fire, and EMS, and also tons of problems: fires, accidents, shootings, stabbings, murders, out-of-control's, you name it, I hear sirens going all the time, and I mean *ALL* the time, and this is the better part of town too. If you have a time critical emergency, you better figure a way to handle it yourself because it's going to be a while before the pros show up...and they are pros, I know quite a few of them, and they're good, they do the best they can.

Reply to
Fred Bloggs

Try individual.net. For $13/yr you get excellent text-only NNTP service. No binaries, so pron is out.

I hate it when that happens.

We built a relay logic tic-tac-toe machine when I was in high school. Its logic was flawless; it never lost and would often win, even if it had to cheat (erasing your 'X' to put in its 'O') to do it. ;-) We couldn't figure out how to do the various mirror and rotation images, so it got pretty big and needed LOTSA power.

--
  Keith
Reply to
krw

ElectronDepot website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.