Anyone familiar with Rabbit Semiconductor's Dynamic C?

Is anyone on the group familiar with Rabbit Semiconductor's Dynamic C? I picked up a RCM4010 Dev Kit US cheap. The disk is still sealed, but the power transformer is missing from the kit. It is listed as: 101-0685 Power Supply 12VDC 3Pins but no mention of the current rating.

How does 'Dynamic C, V10' compare to other versions of C?

Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
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Many years ago I completed a project with the original Rabbit 2000. At the time it looked good with requiring external memory to work.

The most serious downside was the C compiler which produced very slow and verbose code, where I had to write assembler for a couple of loops. The speed difference was 30:1. I have no idea what version I used, nor how that relates to your V10.

I feel it no longer competes with microcontrollers that have embedded Flash and memory. However as a tool to get into embedded processing it's a good start.

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Mike Perkins 
Video Solutions Ltd 
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Reply to
Mike Perkins

The 4000 series has more memory and features than the 2000 series. I have a 2020 laying in front of me. I is from an INECO BASIC pipe bender. It is the third controller to fail in the last 10 years. This was bought new a little over 14 months ago and has a lot of the traces missing where their crap backup battery dissolved the copper.

The 4000 series has flash. I haven't compared all the different versions yet, so I can't say anything about the RAM.

Reply to
Michael A. Terrell

I used Dynamic C years ago on a Z World microcontroller board with keypad and display. The biggest difference I noticed is that if you declare a variable and initialize a value on the same line, it becomes a constant.

int A = 10; // a constant, trying to assign "A" a different value won't work.

if, instead, you do:

int A; A = 10;

It works just fine. This may have been changed since I used Dynamic C some

15 years ago.

The program I used Dynamic C for loaded and saved programs for an Allen Bradley CVIM machine vision system for a Maytag plant. The normal way to save and load programs was to use a PCMCIA memory card and select the program you wanted to use. They thought that was more complicated than they wanted to mess with so we did the Z World microcontroller project. They had a 6 position selector switch, in normal mode, select which of the 6 programs you wanted and the system would load the Vision system processor using Allen Bradley's protocol. When they selected "save" mode, they could program the vision system, select the program, and press the button to save into that memory location.

I still have the source code I could paste but I'm still not a very experienced C programmer, and I was even greener then! I've never had a class on 'C' programming, when I bought a PC, I bought Turbo C and a book to teach myself C.

RogerN

Reply to
RogerN

Perhaps I'm missing something here, but in

formatting link

the only reference to Flash is: Supports 8-bit or 16-bit Flash and SRAM memories

The modules are generous with Flash and SRAM, but then they're not very competitive.

--
Mike Perkins 
Video Solutions Ltd 
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Reply to
Mike Perkins

Not for high volume applications, but I paid $25 for it. If you do limited runs like INECO, it's not a bad price. I was hoping that the

4000 used the same programming cable as the 2000, but it's smaller. 2 VS 1.27 mm spacing. I would like to be able to store the code for these boards, since INECO wants $700 + Shipping from Italy for them. Their US agent can only sell you a new one when you have problems.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell

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