Rechargeable Alkaline v NiMh

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Some of my gadgets, notably a shaver and a TV remote, seem to work
better with alkaline rather than NiMh batteries. I have a weather
station that instructs me not to use "rechargeable" batteries.

Can I assume that the difference is the higher voltage provided by
alkaline batteries and that the weather station would be content with
rechargeable alkaline batteries?

And a few more questions if I may-
When would I use NiMh batteries in preference to rechargeable alkaline
ones?

What is the difference between NiMh and alkaline chargers?

My mains powered alkaline battery charger has a switch to set alkaline
or NiMh. What does changing the switch position do?

My USB powered alkaline battery charger does not have a similar
switch. How does it "know"?
<(Amazon.com product link shortened)>.

And yes, I have Googled but was overwhelmed by information on
recharging _non_-rechargeable alkaline batteries.

Re: Rechargeable Alkaline v NiMh
 Gordon Levi wrote:
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** NiMH cells have a lower terminal voltage and high self discharge rates -  making them unsuitable for applications that do not require high current or where a long time span between replacement is important, like a wall clock.
  

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** Rechargeable alkalines come in different chemistries - what is true of one is not true of another.  

  
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** NiMH can give very high current for short times - so are best in digital cameras and other high current applications.  


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** There is no consistent difference, NiMH chargers vary enormously and so do ones for alkalines.


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** Stupid question, we do not even know what charger you have.  



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** How do you know it does?  

It may well charge the both in the same way, seeing as only one rather special type of alkaline cell is specified.  



...  Phil  

  



Re: Rechargeable Alkaline v NiMh
Once upon a time on usenet Phil Allison wrote:
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Not completely true about high self discharge rates. There is an increasing  
amount of 'LSD' NiMH cells. Eneloop started the trend but I've seen at least  
five other major manufacturers have followed suit. (I have some Varta and  
Panasonic LSDs along with a heap of Eneloops.) I use them in everything from  
remotes and wall clocks to LED flashlights and my camera. They last between  
two and three years in remotes and I can't tell you in the wall clock as  
it's already gone for three years, longer than an alkaline cell would have.
--  
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a  
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Re: Rechargeable Alkaline v NiMh
 ~misfit~ wrote:

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** Alkaline AA and AAA cells still have more energy capacity AND much slower self discharge than Eneloops for about 1/4 the price.

For flashlights and cameras - use Eneloops, but for wall clocks or TV remotes it's nuts.


....  Phil  




  




Re: Rechargeable Alkaline v NiMh
Once upon a time on usenet Phil Allison wrote:
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You call it nuts I call it principle. I refuse to use a single-use cell  
where I can use a rechargeable. Not all priorities have to be about money.
--  
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a  
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Rechargeable Alkaline v NiMh
 ~misfit~ wrote:
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 >
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 ** Well OK then.  

But my wall clock and wireless door bell will not work long or at all if I use NiMH cells - the terminal voltage is too low.  



....   Phil  



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