How to connect inductive pickup to scope?


Hi all,
I have an old inductive pickup from a timing light that I would like to
connect to my 60MHz Fluke Scopemeter, to be able to pick a certain cylinder
firing in my car. I simply hooked the wires from the pickup to the inputs on
one of the scope channels, but that produced nothing useful.
Does anyone know what else needs to be done before I can make use of this
signal? The pickup works fine when plugged into the timing light it came
from.
Any suggestions much appreciated.
--Nick
Perth, WA
Reply to
Nick
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how about connecting the 12v input to the ignition coil to the sync or trigger input of the scope
: Hi all, : : I have an old inductive pickup from a timing light that I would like to : connect to my 60MHz Fluke Scopemeter, to be able to pick a certain cylinder : firing in my car. I simply hooked the wires from the pickup to the inputs on : one of the scope channels, but that produced nothing useful. : : Does anyone know what else needs to be done before I can make use of this : signal? The pickup works fine when plugged into the timing light it came : from. : : Any suggestions much appreciated. : : --Nick : Perth, WA : :
Reply to
Ed-
Unfortunately, because my car is currently equipped with a distributor, that gives me a pulse for every cylinder, whereas I'm looking for only cylinder #1.
Reply to
Nick
I'm still interested in how to do this, but I have got it working for the moment by tapping into the SCR trigger within the timing light. It means I have to utilise the timing light to get the readings, but it's a work-around for the moment :)
Reply to
Nick
At a guess, i'd say the signal from the probe itself isnt big/noticible enough for the scope to pick up ..
Obviously the electronics inside the timing light convert this into something more noticible to trigger the light, so that works ..perhaps your own form of amplifier could be created to turn the low level signal into something the scope can handle .. assuming youv already brough the scope to its highest sensitivity levels and still no luck ..
HTH
Reply to
Lord-Data
Thanks, I think you're right - I will take a closer look at the circuitry inside the timing light and do some quick reverse-engineering. Or in all likelyhood, I'll just have a dual-purpose timing light from now on ;)
Cheers,
--Nick Perth, WA
Reply to
Nick

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