LPC2101 development kit, which one?

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Hello Folks,

The Philips ARM series had been out of my price range but the LPC2101
finally seems to be in reach, meaning under $2 in quantity. Now if one
wants to try it out which kit would work? I'd have no problem if it was
for another one of the ARM chips as they seem to be quite compatible.

The only kit for the lower number parts I found at Digikey was the
KS2106 LPC210x Kickstart kit. It is listed to be for the LPC2104 through
2106. Unfortunately there is no data sheet on it and the IAR site
doesn't find it. What I'd need for kicking the tires would be the IAR
suite or something similar, a small experimental board (which seems to
be in that kit) and a USB programmer (no word about that one).

Does anyone use this KS2106 kit? Is it the complete deal to get started?

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
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Given that I know (from the msp430 list) that you want the ADC,
you could go for the LPC-H2138 from www.olimex.com. A lot more
ROM and RAM than 2101, but it has the ADC, and it's always good
to have extra headroom when developing. Should be under $100,
shipped to you with JTAG adapter.

Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
Hello Clifford,

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Sparkfun has that one in the US for $65. But you'd need a USB
programmer. Those 'new and improved' laptops are USB only.

The 2101 also has the ADC but it's not in the data sheet (yet?). The
whole section 6.8 where its TOC says the ADC is spec'd was missing from
the data sheet on the Philips server. Really strange.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?

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The new Keil board might be better.  The LPC2104/5/6 are the oldest LPC2000
chips, and the LPC2101/2/3 are the newest, with quite some differences.

http://www.keil.com/mcb2103 /

Karl Olsen




Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
On Wed, 7 Dec 2005 08:48:04 +0100, the renowned "Karl Olsen"

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That's the one I have.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
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Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
Hello Spehro,

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How do you program it? Through the Keil ULink USB adapter?

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 19:38:51 GMT, the renowned Joerg

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Actually, I misspoke. I have the mcb2130, which has a serial port for
download.  Have not picked up the ULink USB JTAG.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
Hello Spehro,

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Most laptops don't have any ports other than USB. That often puts a
crimp into things.

Anyway, what do you think about ARM? I was never interested because of
the high prices until someone on the MSP430 forum pointed out the new
Philips devices that can be had for around $2. If that kind of pricing
sticks maybe this could become the next 8051 generation.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 21:26:08 GMT, the renowned Joerg

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I don't yet have to do serious development work with a laptop. Maybe
next year. My main development machines all have a full complement of
real PS2/USB/Serial and parallel ports. Some development boards have
PS2 etc. ports on them just to suck power out of the computer.

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The 8051 (and PICs) are like roaches; they'll be around for a very
long time. But I think, from a designer's pov, the ARM is a very nice
complement to 8-bit and 8/16 micros such as the MSP430. At 0.18u the
new Cortex M3 (Thumb mode only) will be only 0.35mm^2, they say. The
existing ARM7 core units are a bit slow at some math operations, and
system cost is going to be a bit higher than 8-bit micros in some
cases (low output drive and voltage, multiple regulators etc.) but
they are already pretty much in a different class, and there's an
upward migration path.  

Also, like the 8051, they're on their way to having a large number of
manufacturers and a large number of variants on the market. So, I'm
bullish on them.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
Hello Spehro,

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The newer LPC dev boards are a bit strange in this respect. They use a
USB link only to suck power, it doesn't connect to anywhere but the
regulator input. Programming is either via JTAG or RS232.


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Hmm, slow on math? That would be a concern since I have to run lots of
filters. Multiplication is the reason why the MSP430 won't fly since
only the luxury editions (lots of $$) come with a HW multiplier.

Yes, the dual supply on the ARM is a pain. If I use them it'll probably
be one switcher and a linear regulator, or two switchers. Whatever is
more economical. One switcher would be needed anyway no matter which uC
since it's battery operated and anything other than a couple AA cells is
not really practical.


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That means longevity, to some extent. This is why I had never used
anything but 8051 in the past. Stuff needed to be able to remain in
production for at least a decade.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
snipped-for-privacy@removethispacbell.net says...
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USB to serial port will work (or so I've heard, since you can get away
with just Tx and Rx running the other lines manually I don't see any
reason to doubt it).  They can be programmed with either.  You do
sacrifice fewer pins with a serial update but if you are already using
the JTAG anyway....

Robert

Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
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You don't need ULINK. Use onboard RS232 port and internal bootloader.
Software is free and available at philips site.

Best regards,
Slawc


Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
Hello Slawc,

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Yes, if I had RS232. But the PCs around here are mostly USB only. Maybe
some converter box would work. But I remember that it didn't with the
MSP430 programmer so I had to get the USB version for that one. I just
want to avoid having a gazillion of these boxes flying around, like one
for every uC family.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
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           ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

OK, just get the manufactures to all agree on a programming / debugging
platform that will take care of all present and future processors.


I am sure you have the clout to ask them all for this little request.

Donald

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Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
Joerg,

to get going fast this is the best choice right now. MCB2103 with ULINK
ordering at www.LPCtools.com (no quoting just get your credit card out
of your pocket)
Combo price $249, that's not exactly free but well worth the money,
considering that the KEIL C-compiler can be used for projects up to 16k
code and unlike the trial version of the 51 generates code that is
located at the Reset Vector.
The ULINK is a USB to JTAG device that gives you quite some nice
debugging options.
For the same functionality in tools in the 51-world you would probably
pay more :-)

Your intentions to use the ARM running at 70 MHz for algorithms, expect
it to be up to 100 times fast than a 12 MHz 51 if using 32-bit integers
and probably similar for float. Not really a fair comparison but still
a valid one.

An Schwob

p.s. for pricing idea, the devices are already listed at Digikey. At
100 pieces, the LPC2101 is already below $2, one off is a ridiculous
$3.15 (not including shipping ;-)



Joerg wrote:
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Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
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this seems too much expensive for a small project like this.
Under $100 USD is what I think it should worth.

Sam
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Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
Sam,

don't knwo where you are but Joerg is in the USA. As a consultant $249
is a few hours worth of time, never ever is it possible to make this
kind of enviroment using such short
time. On top of it you save hours debugging the first project.

You really don't need to buy it, besides, is your name Joerg?

An Schwob

sam wrote:
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Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
On 9 Dec 2005 21:47:13 -0800, the renowned "An Schwob in the USA"

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Yes, $250 US is nothing. I think Keil is based on the GCC compiler,
but you're also getting their installation script, their simulator,
debugger, IDE, the board and the USB JTAG box. Impulse purchase
territory.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?

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I find that very hard to believe! They sell their own compiler, don't
they?


--

John Devereux

Re: LPC2101 development kit, which one?
On 10 Dec 2005 13:43:33 +0000, the renowned John Devereux

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Okay, maybe their development environment supports their proprietary
compiler and the open source compiler. There is definitely GNU stuff
in there:

"The HELLO program is a very simple program that prints "Hello World"
to the serial port of the AT91M40800.  When you can successfully build
and run this program, you have used the entire toolset including:

The uVision2 integrated development environment.
The GNU compiler, linker and the ÁVision2 simulator/debugger."


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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