embedded tools

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Perhaps this is a very naive question, but still, what are tools that
you use for embedded development and debug which make life
( development and debug ) easy ?

Alternatively, can you all suggest me some website which enlists the
popular tools which developers use(like lint and eclipse etc.)

regards
ashu

Re: embedded tools
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Can you narrow down what you are after.  At least the type of processor you
are wanting to use or some characteristics of the application being
developed.  Otherwise the list would be massive and be mostly irrelevant to
you.

--
Regards,
Richard.

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Re: embedded tools
Thanks Richard!

I am looking for things which help in project management, or debugging
things, good hex editors, binary file comarison tools, etc etc.

Architecture: ARM9 and Motorola, M68HC11 and HC08



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Re: embedded tools
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a code versioning system (cvs, subversion) is a must. IMHO of
course :)

Bye Jack

Re: embedded tools

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A versioning system was already mentioned. Subversion is widespread
and works well.

You already mentioned lint. Although some "innovations" from C99 are
still not implemented, PC-Lint seems still the best static code
checking tool for "C".

I prefer plain old "make" over fancy IDEs.

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I rarely need a "hex" editor for embedded development. What do you
intend to do?

Besides this, the text editors I'm using (MED and PsPad) can edit also
binaries. And my favourite comparison tool (Beyond Compare) supports
also binary comparisons, of course.

http://wiki.oliverbetz.de/owiki.php/TextEditors lists more editors,
but might be autdated.

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HC11 is "very mature". I wouldn't rely on long availability these
days. 9S12 is a successor. I also wouldn't recommend HC08 for new
designs, use 9S08 if possible. There are interesting new derivatives.

Regarding debuggers, it depends what you are willing to spend or what
your work time is worth. A very good low cost tool for HC11, HC(S)12
and HC(S)08 (and many more you didn't mention) is John Hartman's NoICE
debugger http://noicedebugger.com /

Lauterbach, iSYSTEM etc. have more features and can increase
productivity but cost _much_ more. I really like to work with my
iC3000 for the 9S12 and Coldfire V2, but I'm rather disappointed by
the support quality. Besides this, there were drastic changes in price
policy recently.

You should visit the http://www.embedded-world.de trade fair starting
soon.

(full quote deleted)

please quote only relevant parts.

Oliver
--
Oliver Betz, Muenchen (oliverbetz.de)

Re: embedded tools

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emacs (text editor, might look at Eclipse if didn't already know emacs)
make (build system)
gcc-arm (compiler/assembler/linker)
openocd (jtag-dubug software tool)
Amontec usb-jtag dongle (but there are cheaper generic ones)
git (version control system; used to use subversion)
insight (debugger, occasionally)
Vutrax PCB layout software (non-free)
LTSpice circuit simulation
Context (typesetting software for user manuals etc)

All under debian linux (although all have windows versions).

Plus various oscilloscopes, spectrum analyzers, power supplies,
soldering iron etc!

--

John Devereux

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Why did you change from SVN?  I am happy with SVN - what are the advantages
of GIT (tell me to shut up if this is off topic).


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...hammer, etc

--
Regards,
Richard.

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Re: embedded tools
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It's not off topic (at least, there are others here who would like to
know...)

The big advantage of GIT that I've heard of is that it is distributed,
which can be important if you have people working in different places
with slow connections.  You can have a full copy of the repository on
your local machine, making it very quick and easy to do things like
compares to older versions or different branches.  SVN is very much a
client-server model, although you can tie it together with extra
software to replicate servers.

For me, the SVN client-server model is an advantage (especially for
backup), and the command-line tools and gui tools (like tortoise for
windows) are very handy.  The other big plus for SVN is trac.

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A good coffee machine is handy too.

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OK, the advantages I can think of, that I notice are:
 
 - all operations seem much faster (instant).

 - Project repositories seem to stay small, disk space is used very
   efficiently.

 - easy per-project "repositories", each project is it's own
   independent "repository". All the history is under a single, hidden
   ".git" folder at the root of the project. No central server to
   maintain.

 - I found the continuously incrementing svn repository "version
   number" confusing with respect to multiple projects. And I seem to
   recall problems with svn when directories were moved around within
   a project.

 - Git has a some nice graphical history visualisation and diff
   tools.

Note I am only using it as a "single" developer. And the "limitations"
I found with svn may well have been just my own misunderstandings.

--

John Devereux

Re: embedded tools
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I tried Eclipse once a few years ago. My impression was that it seemed
bloated and nothing in it jumped out as offering me anything significant
over emacs (at least for what I use emacs for - I'm not an all-in-one IDE
type of person; I prefer to use tools from the CLI directly) so I just
went straight back to using emacs.

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Yes and no on the non-free part.

Vutrax is normal commercial software, but they offer a limited 256 pin
version free of charge.

(I used to use the 256 pin Linux version before I switched to gEDA.)

Simon.

--
Simon Clubley, clubley@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Microsoft: Bringing you 1980's technology to a 21st century world

Re: embedded tools

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Yeah, me too - I haven't tried it recently though, and didn't give it
much of a chance at the time. Java on debian was pretty broken then
too (due to licencing) but may be much better now, with Eclipse itself
much more mature.

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Sorry, I meant that I was using the paid for version. I would probably
try geda seriously, but have been using Vutrax for ~20 years(!). I
only do layout occasionally so switching to another system would be
very disruptive. Vutrax is dongle-free, stable, reliable and works on
Linux and Windows.

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--

John Devereux

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Write some of them to suit yourself.  Do the simple things.  Of the
above, hex editors and file comparison are extremely simple.
Initially at least you would be better advised to get debuggers and
project management tools from the world.  Source maintenance and
revision systems are probably quite available in suitable form.

Please do not top-post.  So doing has lost everything you were
replying to.  Your answer belongs after (or intermixed with) the
quoted material to which you reply, after snipping all irrelevant
material.  See the following links:

  <http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
  <http://www.caliburn.nl/topposting.html
  <http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html
  <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/ (taming google)
  <http://members.fortunecity.com/nnqweb/ (newusers)

--
 [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
 [page]: <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net
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Re: embedded tools

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although you _can_ implement a simple file comparison, I don't want to
miss the extremly advanced tools available these days.

Side by side view, direct editing, (S)FTP access and lots of other
features save so much time that it is a no-brainer whether to buy
Beyond Compare or EC Merge.

Oliver
--
Oliver Betz, Muenchen (oliverbetz.de)

Re: embedded tools

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Developing embedded systems that meet expectations of performance,
integrity, safety and quality is not easy. The work can be made much
easier by adopting a really good development process and sticking to
appropriate standards for the domain you are developing for.

Definitely a version control system and change tracking system is a must
for any engineering development process. If you are a one-man band make
sure you have some friends who will act as sounding boards, assistants
in reviews and who will maintain commercial confidentiality.

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Your best tool is you. Spend time up front in the development to fully
understand what you are tyring to produce, be strict in following
standards (especially coding standards). Inspect early and often and try
to find and expel problems before you design them in. In fact do not
design faults and bugs into the system in the first place.

As for the other helpful tools; be clear of your needs for tools, run
proper evaluations for all tools you select for your shortlist and be
prepared to take time to learn to use them adequately to your needs.

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Re: embedded tools

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printf

#define


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Re: embedded tools
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True. And for when you can't use printf or it's equivalent, the OP should
be aware that an LED is an excellent debugging tool.

Simon.

--
Simon Clubley, clubley@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Microsoft: Bringing you 1980's technology to a 21st century world

Re: embedded tools

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Along with a multimeter, logic probe and oscilloscope. Of course, the
best tool of all is a Mk1 brain and eyeballs.

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Re: embedded tools

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I also make a software printf/RS232 routine that toggles a single I/O line
so that I can hook up a opto-isolator (LED). The other side of the
opto-isolator I feed to a MAX232 to get RS232 and get print out of internal
variables even when everything else is failing/not operational yet. The
optical isolation is important to avoid electrical problems when hooking up
different kinds of systems together.





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Skillful hands, clever head and stubborn arse.

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http:\www.google.com


Vladimir Vassilevsky
DSP and Mixed Signal Design Consultant
http://www.abvolt.com

Re: embedded tools
Vladimir Vassilevsky schrieb:
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Better try to avoid backslashes ;-)

I often found what I needed when asking a search engine for
"$ gnu toolchain"...

Falk
--
An Enfield Diesel seems to do an even better job than a Harley at
converting fuel into noise without much unwanted speed!

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