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I was told by an auto-electrician that a transistor in my car immboliser has
died.  Is it possible for transistors to die?  Why do they die?



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Basically fluff and dust clog the vents in their enclosure and the poor
little fellas just suffocate.

Rheilly

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Any idea what happens to them after they die?

Someone told me they come back as diodes.



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I've heard that in an "Immboliser" sometimes they get "Immbolised" but
have never seen it myself.

Rheilly

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Obviously a figure of speech - usually excess voltage or current can damage
a transistor, some types are vulnerable to static discharge.

With automotive equipment you have to consider vibration, corrosion or
ingress of road grime making connectors unreliable.

Its unusual for auto electricians to delve into component level fault
finding, they more often check connectors and other obvious things - then
swap out the unit.

More than likely the bloke told you; "a transistor died" because it sounds
like he knows what he's on about.



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Ian has probably identified the true source of the comment.

Your obvious response though is to ask the auto-electrician to replace
the transistor. Be interesting to hear his excuse for not doing so.

Sylvia.

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For all I know he could be right about a transistor died, but automotive
electronic modules are more often than not potted so component level repair
is impossible, and they're notoriously expensive to replace.

Could be interesting when the bill is presented for; 'that transistor'.



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My immobiliser died some years ago.
Easy to access the pcb after all the cable ties are cut, and if you are
a contortionist artist.
It could have been a transistor, but it wasn't.

It was only the solder joints of the relays on the pcb.
Vibration and temperature changes have made them brittle.
If I hadn't taken some time to locate the fault, the repair job would
have been a 30 minute one.
Re-soldering took only minute.
I posted a heads up on this group at the time.

Tony

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Given the legal (The Australia Consumer Law) requirement that spare
parts be "reasonably available for a reasonable period", one would have
a case against the manufacturer or importer where the price is excessive.

Mind you, I suspect that no precedents ever get set - anyone who starts
down that path will likely get the part at a reasonable price.

Sylvia.

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"reasonably available for a reasonable period", one
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excessive.

Would you please provide a link to the specific section of the 'The Australia
Consumer Law' that you refer to.
If you are dealing with Aldi etc. you can just take the faulty thing back and
they
will refund the purchase price (only within a month or so, unless covered by a
manufacturers warranty?).

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that path will likely get the part at a reasonable
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Consumer Law' that you refer to.
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they
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manufacturers warranty?).
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that path will likely get the part at a reasonable
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The right to return faulty goods, within a reasonable time, is a
separate matter. But long after any right to return the goods would have
expired, the company has to make spare parts available, so that the
consumer is not faced with discarding goods just because they have
developed a fault.

http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/caca2010265/sch2.html

Unfortunately, Austlii has problems with schedules, and cannot provide
links to individual sections.

-------
58   Guarantee as to repairs and spare parts

      (1)  If:
               (a)  a person supplies, in trade or commerce, goods to a
consumer; and
               (b)  the supply does not occur by way of sale by auction;

there is a guarantee that the manufacturer of the goods will take
reasonable action to ensure that facilities for the repair of the goods,
and parts for the goods, are reasonably available for a reasonable
period after the goods are supplied.
-------

Now, there is a possible ambiguity as to what "reasonably available"
means, but I think a court would find that a spare part that was
unreasonably priced, by reference to the cost to the company of making
it available, then the part would not be "reasonable available".

Sylvia.



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Yes, as long as they are silent about it ? - the manufacturer does not
want bad publicity from a court case, or a precedent set, and probably
will do a deal just to make it go away. (99% would just pay and not
argue)  Would this be done by the person in a "small claims" type
court or on your behalf by consumer affairs ?

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Most likely via the small claims route. Just a matter of filling in a
form and paying a modest filing fee (typically a few tens of dollars).
If the company is really trying to gouge consumers on spare part prices,
the matter would probably not even reach a hearing.

Consumer affairs would be unlikely to have the resources to chase such
things up, being more concerned (and rightly so, IHMO) with products
that endanger lives.

Sylvia.

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Not an option now. The guy snipped the wires presumably going to the
indicator lights which had been staying on incorrectly. Problem solved but
functionality now reduced.



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