How long will Raspbian 7 be supported - same as Debian Wheezy?

I'm running Raspbian 7/Wheezy and want to continue for as long as
possible because I need the openct package and that doesn't look like
it's going to be made available for 8/Jessie.
So, has Raspbian 7 acquired 'LTS' support like Wheezy and will thus be
supported until 2018?
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Chris Green
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Chris Green
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Op Mon, 25 Jul 2016 15:15:15 +0100 schreef Chris Green:
Where do the numbers 7 and 8 come from? Never seen them.
groet Coos
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Coos Haak
On Mon, 25 Jul 2016 22:05:18 +0200, Coos Haak , > Op Mon, 25 Jul 2016 15:15:15 +0100 schreef Chris Green:
Debian major release numbers. I think it would be more precise to say Raspbian/Wheezy and Raspbian/Jessie since Raspbian doesn't seem to track the number per se.
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I R A Darth Aggie
If it's working just fine as it is, is there any need for "support"?
Reply to
Rob Morley
I replaced my (*86) server last year. It was running 'sarge' I think
When running well, leave well alone...
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
security patches for example.
Bye Jack
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Reply to
Jack
The number is in /etc/issue and /etc/issue.net. Whether you ever see those will depend on how you usually log on to the system.
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Rob
:-) I like to keep up with security and bug fixes which is what the ongoing long term support provides.
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Chris Green
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Chris Green
... and I still don't have an answer to my original query! :-)
Will Raspbian Wheezy simply track Debian Wheezy for as lonmg as it's supported?
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Chris Green
Reply to
Chris Green
If its on the pub(l)ic Internet, maybe.
On a home network, the only reason to upgrade is either that the old hardware fails and the new hardware isn't supported by the old code, or you need to add some app that doesn't run on the old OS.
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Well yes, but depending on the exposure that the system has that may not be an issue.
Reply to
Rob Morley
Right up until someone finds a way past the firewall and finds a nice easy target to set up in.
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Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun 
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Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
Oh purlease. I have never seen anyone get past a properly set up domestic firewall that didn't have incoming ports open
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
That give people the false sense of security that the firewall would have to be compromised for any attack to take place. Far more likely is that you the user visits a website which pulls down a bit of malicious code. It doesn't have to be a dodgy site either, plenty of popular legit sites have had malware ridden adverts included on the page.
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druck
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RRansil
Please excuse my ignorance, but what is 'openct'? If it has to do with smartcard readers, this may be of interest to you:
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If you do an in-place OS upgrade, it may not even remove 'openct'.
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ray carter
malware written to run on an ARM processor running Linux?
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The Natural Philosopher
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If it has to do with
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Yep that's an easy way past the firewall, plugging in the USB stick you found in the car park is another one.
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Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun 
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Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
Really ? I get a bucket load of malware of various kinds delivered to the inside of my firewall by email just waiting for someone silly enough to run it. If *any* of that lands on *any* machine on the LAN then the firewall is potentially bypassed. Office networks with draconian firewalls have been compromised by the simple expedient of scattering a few USB sticks in the car park.
I don't think anyone can get through my firewall, but getting past it requires only social engineering.
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Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun 
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Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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