Aircraft embedded systems

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
I just got off a flight on one of the new-ish Airbus 330 aircraft.  It
has in-seat video.  I caught the screen as it was rebooting, and it runs
linux - surprisingly, apparently a fairly unmodified linux framebuffer
system (you see the penguin logo, all of the boot messages, etc.
Unfortunately, it all went by too fast for me to follow....)

Anyone know who makes the systems?  The only one I know of, Rosen
Aviation, seems to only make the screen mounts....  Who is the
integrator?  What mobo-screen do they use?

Re: Aircraft embedded systems
On Tue, 03 Jan 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.embedded, in article

Quoted text here. Click to load it

There have been a number of reports of this.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

In-flight Entertainment systems are chosen by the individual airlines,
just like the rest of the cabin interior. You'd have to ask the airline
(or more likely, search google for clues using the keywords of
'In-flight+Entertainment Airbus+330 name_of_airline'

For _your_ entertainment

---------------------
There is a wonderful cartoon from the German computer magazine *c't* pinned
to my group's noticeboard. A passenger is sitting in an airliner using his
laptop, and on the screen appears:

  Bluetooth: new device found: Airbus A310

(reported in Risks Digest 23.72 17 Feb 2005 - article dated 13 Feb 2005)
---------------------

        Old guy

Re: Aircraft embedded systems
On Wed, 04 Jan 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.embedded, in article

Quoted text here. Click to load it


No sooner do I finish posting and go back to work, and I find:

Date: Tue, 03 Jan 2006 21:59:40 +0100
User-Agent: Mozilla Thunderbird 1.0.7 (Windows/20050923)
Newsgroups: alt.os.linux.mandriva,alt.os.linux.mandrake
Followup-To: alt.os.linux.mandriva
Subject: The Inquirer: Airbus 330 seats auto-reboot / Redhat Linux involved

http://www.theinquirer.net/?article28%689

Doesn't give much, because again the airline isn't mentioned.

        Old guy


Re: Aircraft embedded systems
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Well, from what little I do understand of aircraft design, the in-seat
entertainment system is on a "non-critical bus", meaning that power can
be interrupted or whatever....

I did notice that the in-seat systems restarted (screen went blank and
then came back on) quite a few times when the plane was leaving the gate
and taxiing, leading me to think that this was something being done by
the crew or automated systems.  But I did catch the penquin logo only
once....

As for the assertion that the system is slow, figure that you have 1/2
of the 300+ people on the plane streaming videos at any one time.  Then
figure the bandwidth involved.....  Even at 320x240 (and I suspect the
videos are running at 640x480, 25 FPS or so) the bandwidth demand is
*huge*....  This is assuming there is a central server somewhere on the
plane....  I can't imagine that each seat would have its own hard drive....

Re: Aircraft embedded systems
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Many moons ago I was on a Virgin 747 and the system did a reboot. What
came up on screen was a standard PC boot, complete with AMI BIOS
messages. Then it booted into DOS.

I did 'design' such a system once for mental exercise on a flight (well,
the films were all crap) and just assumed it would use some sort of MPEG
  stream to the seats, with a decoder at that point. Based on a typical
sixteen channels of 2Mbit MPEG, you'd only be chucking out 32Mbits plus
overheads.
--
Dave
mail da snipped-for-privacy@llondel.org (without the space)
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Aircraft embedded systems

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's on the "old" systems....  The ones that had fixed channel
programming, like a TV.  This is video on demand - you browse the
selection, then play the movie, so each seat can potentially get its own
stream.  Based on 2 MB/sec, and 150 streams, you're talking 300 MB/sec...

That's a pretty serious network...  Something like a 10Gb backbone...
They have to be doing some sort of subnetting...

Re: Aircraft embedded systems
On Wed, 04 Jan 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.embedded, in article

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yeah - it's lower priority.  When the shan hits the fit, it's gone
unless they are also using it for emergency briefings and the like. You
may recall some airlines give a briefing _movie_ after push-back welcoming
you aboard, and showing you the wonderful safety features on this $PIG.
It's going to be ignored just as hard, but it allows the airline to give
a better demonstration - such as how _do_ you open this emergency door,
and how the masks deploy. It's not a obvious as depicted on that little
folder in the seat pocket.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Normal - changing from ground power, to APU to the engine driven generators.
The modern airliner is an extremely complex beast, and even a twin engine
aircraft will have at least three independent electrical generators, maybe
as many as five (two direct drive, two driven by air motors, and one by
the APU) in which case one might be allowed to be inoperative according
to a very complicated "minimum equipment for dispatch" list. Actually,
during push-back, engine start, and taxi, the back of the bus is at least
as important as the rest of the aircraft. Priorities change at the end
of the runway.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

What airline?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Multiple Gigabit fibers

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Multiple servers, equipment bay near the front of the bird. The fun comes
when they move the seats (maintenance, or re-configuring the bird to meet
[up or down] the competition). Remember that despite the fact that a 340-500
or 340-600 may have a maximum weight of 811,300 pounds (368.0 Metric Ton),
every ounce/gram of "extra" weight reduces the amount of (high) paying
cargo/passengers that can be carried. You may get the concept if you know
that airlines go ga-ga over a tenth of one percent improvement in fuel
consumption. They pay A LOT LESS at the pump than you do, but a 340-500
holds 56,500 US Gallon (213,900 liter) - is that going on your credit
card, or are you paying cash?

        Old guy

Re: Aircraft embedded systems

Quoted text here. Click to load it

On the next gen aircraft every thing including entertainment is over tcpip.
Can over tcpip for instruments. Look at the arinc664 spec.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Automated. When the generators get switched in.

Arinc664  -  defines the use of a deterministic ethernet network as an
avionics databus
in modern aircrafts like the Airbus A380 and the Boeing 787.

Can find some interesting bits and pieces searching the arinc.com website
http://www.arinc.com/amc/reports /
http://www.arinc.com/amc/plane_talk/index.html

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Thought it may have been more like a server per zone.
Or seperate server per class.

Beoing has trialed  entertainment systems over wireless inside aircraft.
Main purpose is to reduce the weight.

Not just for web browsing on your laptop.

I doubt they are using fibre yet for these systems, not unless
they have solved the vibration problem and have very flexible fibre.

Alex



Re: Aircraft embedded systems

Quoted text here. Click to load it
http://www.heise.de/ct/schlagseite/03/01/gross.jpg

best regards
Wolfgang


Re: Aircraft embedded systems
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Thanks / Danke!

--

Tauno Voipio (avionics engineer)
tauno voipio (at) iki fi

Site Timeline