Lynx

If you're a certain kind of weird, the Linx text-based web browser still works: you can install it in about 30 seconds on a Linux machine.

Then you can wonder why in @#$% you bothered.

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Tim Wescott 
Wescott Design Services 
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Reply to
Tim Wescott
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Because you can use it to "browse" on an ssh terminal connection when trapped inside someones firewall...

Because you can visit sites that you wouldn't otherwise dare touch in IE/FF/Chrome...

Because it impresses the feck out of the point'n'drool brigade...

Because I can :)

--
Ian 

"Tamahome!!!" - "Miaka!!!"
Reply to
Ian

I used to use it extensively as it gave me a reasonably secure 'net presence, low bandwidth link and implicitly filtered out all the images (back then, things like Flash didn't exist).

As most of my web surfing is in search of text (research papers, specific files to download, etc.) the text-only aspect would still be acceptable. However, more and more sites are scripted interfaces which I'm not sure Lynx would accommodate as intended.

(I still wish I had a button to disable images/graphics/animations on demand!)

Reply to
Don Y

I tell you two more.

"mutt" for email, which I regularly use and "slrn" for usenet (which I do not use).

Because real programmers don't use Pascal... :-)

bye,

--

piergiorgio
Reply to
Piergiorgio Sartor

Check.

I use 'tin', but same difference.

formatting link
is really nice inside Lynx. I use it for real sometimes. Sadly the pictures don't come out so well.

Theo

Reply to
Theo Markettos

Occasionally, you will find yourself with a very, very narrow pipe to the Internet that also has some kind of a data cap. The imperative is to use only what you need.

You can also sometimes find yourself with a link that is extremely unstable or just really, really doesn't like establishing new TCP sessions, thus making it very difficult to download all the crap pictures, scripts, iframes and what not.

Enter text browsers.

I always keep a copy of Lynx on my machine.

And on a somewhat related note, you know what I miss from the Old Web? That thing Internet Explorer 4 did where it would render as much of the page as it could, and then expand and rerender the page as more content got downloaded.

Reply to
Aleksandar Kuktin

I don't have Flash installed! Works really good at blocking Flash apps! :> (so far, all it's cost me is the inability to watch silly cat videos, etc.)

I've been using NoScript with some success. Of course, it means incrementally reenabling particular domains for sites that insist on scripting everything.

Reply to
Don Y

firefox still does that.

note, however, that if the page uses an external sytlesheet none of the page can be rendered until the stylesheet has been loaded.

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umop apisdn 


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Reply to
Jasen Betts

Hi Don,

In sci.electronics.design Don Y wrote: []

same here, but I can still see silly cat videos with chromium and HTML5 *if* I really want to!

Al

Reply to
alb

Hi Piergiorgio,

In sci.electronics.design Piergiorgio Sartor wrote: []

I use alpine regularly.

I use tin regularly.

And why would that be so?

Reply to
alb

I have Firefox add-on installed that lets me download flash animations (which I can view elsewhere). But, aside from testing it to familiarize myself with its operation, I've never actually *used* it!

SWMBO "misses" the Flash-ability as many of her friends/colleagues take to emailing her links to various bits of fluff. However, I think she has come to realize that she's not really missing anything of substance!

I've toyed with the idea of setting up this machine with something like Deep Freeze -- or, even building a new "restore image" for it such that I can overwrite the disk with the original system image quickly (a matter of minutes). But, so far, that hasn't risen to the level of importance to make it onto the REAL ToDo list! :-/

Reply to
Don Y

On 2014-08-13 16:32, alb wrote: [...]

formatting link

:-)

bye,

--

piergiorgio
Reply to
Piergiorgio Sartor

I sometimes use lynx in a shell by calling up "lynx ." to browse through files and directories.

Reply to
boB

Piker. BTDT. Then i got smarter and learned more directly powerful languages that saved me typing time. ByBy machine code. I still find toy languages disgusting. Pascal used to be such, then wiser heads took over. Tough toenails.

?-)

Reply to
josephkk

Hi boB,

In sci.electronics.design boB wrote: []

hey that rocks! and opening up file is much faster, you simply select it and hit 'return'. I wonder which default application it is using... jee I should stop reading and start working today!

Reply to
alb

In article , Don Y wrote: .. web browsing ... }(I still wish I had a button to disable images/graphics/animations }on demand!)

Then I suggest you try Opera.

I (capital i) toggles the display of images.

G toggles use of style (very useful for those pages which have dark writing on a black background, or yellow text on white).

F12 brings up a menu on which you can toggle animated images (E), Javascript (a), and cookies (c), and others, as well as a dialog (d) which allows you to save per-site preferences for some of these.

Reply to
Charles Bryant

Does it inhibit their *download*, as well? I.e., if you can prevent them from being "fetched" by the browser, often the pages can display at lightning speed!

Reply to
Don Y

For "normal" browsers AdBlock Plus is useful in that regard, and NoScript allows selective execution of JavaScript, and Ghostery allows trackers to be blocked.

AdblockPlus is especially beneficial when connected via 3G

Reply to
Tom Gardner

Yeah, I've used AdBlock and currently use NoScript.

But, ages ago, (e.g., Netscape days) you could inhibit all "pictures" (which I assume could easily be defined with specific mime types) from download. Then, if you decided you wanted to see them, you could INDIVIDUALLY download those of interest *or* enable all of them, again. Because each image had a particular spot on the page, it was easy to identify which ones would likely be interesting/pertinent and which would be ads, fluff, etc.

E.g., with NoScript, you have to play a guessing game as to which domains you want to temporarily enable for that page (usually you can make educated guesses and hit it on the first or second pass without having to resort to enabling "all on this page")

Reply to
Don Y

Although I understand Ghostery is itself suspected of being spyware so switched to Disconnect. Anyways, both also protect from the recently mentioned tracking-without-cookies via canvas fingerprinting evilness.

Reply to
Anssi Saari

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