Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
Hello All,

I am researching good universities in Europe and US for PhD on
Embedded Systems. I want to focus on hard-real time systems, with
added emphasis on reliability of the system. Of course, going to a
university that is sufficiently funded is the main objective. The
other and equally important criteria would be industrial contacts,
since, I would like to come back to the industry after graduation.

Can someone please list down say, 5 best Universities?

Thanks again for your help!

Devendra Rai

Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Sorry, I guess there are none.  I was looking forward to reading the
answers. I seem to remember this question coming up before.  You might do a
search on this newsgroup and see if anything comes up.  I really expected
there would be at least a few current opinions.

--
Scott
Validated Software
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research
Quoted text here. Click to load it


York Uni used to do a lot of work on Ada but that may have depended on an
individual (was it Prof Pyle).

Martyn Thomas and Praxis who do real time secure sofwtare are in Bath but
whether they have links with a university, I do not know.  But it does
suggest that if you find a company that does the sort of thing you are
interested in, you could ask them



Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Nohau UK has a non-commercial entity called the Nohau Academy (you can
Google it)
Within the Nohau Academy we list all of the Universities in the UK that we
believe are offering Embedded Electronics courses. Universities that offer
Embedded courses provide us with their details and we list them. There is
also a map of the UK showing the location all of the universities. This is a
free service that we maintain.


--
Kevin Pope
Nohau UK Ltd.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research
Hello Again,

It's nice to see so many people responding. There was a very
interesting reply by Paul E. Bennett, where he referred to embedded
systems "training" and lack of people interested in it.

Well, for my case, there are two very strong reasons:

(1). From my professional work experience (Model-based design
Engineer, three years, Delphi Automotive Systems), "training" is very
specific to the technology at hand, and the problem that is being
addressed. So, in short, training does not give me enough insight, nor
theoretical knowledge, that I will require to develop solutions to
related, but not the same problem instances. So, if I trained for
automotive embedded software, I doubt if I will be able to work on
stuff, like, full authority digital engine controllers. A PhD
essentially helps develop the approach to solve a problem at hand,
rather than being tied to a very specific instance of it: theoretical
knowledge, skills, analysis and so on.

(2). I am an international student in US, so, for me to find even an
internship (or apprenticeship), I would need to demonstrate my skills
levels, and convince any company that I am worth the legal hassle. My
case, inspite of all the professional exposure, and the awards and
certificates, falls flat in the face of companies like GE, where they
won't look at my resume if it does not have those magical letters
"PhD".

I am also taking this opportunity to pose another question: So, does
the way HR screen resumes, essentially looking for "tags" or
"keywords" help them get the right person? I am not sure. I have seen
lot of positions where my skills were a good match, but my keywords
weren't. Does this approach not encourage an entirely different skills
set of beefing up your resume to include all the keywords for the
position? I am not speaking as a loser here, I have a job! I know
tonnes of people who have the right resume but aren't a fit to the
job, even by the most lax standards that could be invented.

Yeah, I agree with the opinion of mixing the right kind of internship
with formal education. It should work wonders. I will be looking for
internships, and I hope that I will find a few when I need them!

As for my PhD, I am following up with a faculty from some
universities. Definitely, it is very hard to find a match: right mix
of theoretical analysis with hands-on skill development for a PhD
course.

Thanks for your opinions,

Devendra Rai

Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I haven't been looking at all the posts here because of all the spam, so
this response is a bit late.

After being incredibly lucky in my rather random choice of a thesis
advisor (for my Masters degree), I decided that the most important thing
to getting a PhD, and even perhaps a Masters degree, is the thesis
advisor; your choice of school becomes secondary if you've found "the
one" advisor for you.

I suggest you get down to your University library, and start going
through the journals.  Note the name(s) of the folk who are doing the
work that interest you.  Note how many articles each one publishes, and
how many let their grad students ride on their fame (or ride on their
grad student's fame).  Lots of substantive articles will suggest energy,
interest, and good funding.  Use this to get a short list.

Once you have a short list, I'd suggest that you contact not only the
profs on it to check their interest level in you, but that you contact
their grad students to try to get a feel for how good of a person the
prospective thesis advisor is for his/her grad students.  

Note that calling or emailing prospective advisors to say "I am a fan of
your work and I want to be your student" should go a long way to making
them enthusiastic about _you_, so don't be shy about revealing your
reasons for getting in touch.  I'm guessing here, but having an
application show up blind at the registrar's office isn't going to carry
as much weight as having an application show up with a note from one of
the faculty.

Keep in mind that in many places (certainly the US) a grad student is, to
some extent, at the mercy of his/her thesis advisor -- your advisor can
push you on or hold you back to a great extent, and in most schools
there's not much to keep a malicious advisor from really jerking you
around.  So you want to have a good feel for what the person is like.  
This is why I suggest you talk to the prospects students, discretely, and
try to get an idea of what your experience will be.

Once you've selected a short-list of advisors, the choice of schools
should be obvious...

--
www.wescottdesign.com

Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Hi Devendra,

Take a look at some of the research going on in the Cambridge University
Computer Laboratory (www.cl.cam.ac.uk). A number of their groups would
seem to cover the areas you are interested in.

This laboratory has a very long track record of industrial involvement.
You'll find many of the academic staff are founders/directors of some
very well known companies all with their roots in the laboratory.

You might also like to look at the School of Computer Science at the
University of Manchester. The Advanced Processor Technologies group may
be of particular relevance.

Bristol University has a strong track record, although perhaps with more
of a hardware emphasis. They have a long record of industrial involvement
(David May, founder of Inmos and more recently XMOS is professor). The
Bristol area is second only the Cambridge area in hi-tech start-up
activity.

HTH,


Jeremy


Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research
Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you are interested in medical applications, maybe Case Western
University. Their engineering dept. also works on other things.

Here's their news page-
http://blog.case.edu/case-news/case_school_of_engineering/index
Robotics
Energy
Biomedical Engineering

Embedded systems is just so broad a term. Maybe you need to think
about what in particular you are interested in studying. For example,
wind turbine control, Advanced Prosthetic research,  robotic vehicles.


I'll also sing some praises for my alma mater, University of Dayton.
Signal and image processing, control, and communications research for
application to robotics, aerospace, and medical systems.

Ed

Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research

I should have read closer. I missed that you wanted PhD programs.  In
the US, you may look first at MIT.
  Ed

Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research
Thanks a lot everyone! As I am finding out, there is lot of work
involved in choosing the right universities. It is correct, as it was
pointed out, that in American universities, the student is very
tightly "knit" with his/her adviser. So, it is scary to be going to a
place where there is only one faculty working in my area of interest.
I have known people who have undergone the trauma when his adviser
went on a sabbatical. or quit altogether.

I am not sure how it works in Europe, meaning the funding for the
research. Does it come via a project signed up by the professor (as is
the case in US).

Also, I was specifically looking for hard-real time embedded systems
(Medical devices, aerospace, automotive). As I am finding out, there
are very very few places where I could get both hands-on knowledge and
theoretical depth.

A very good place seems to be UIUC (US) or CMU (US). UPC Catalunya
(Spain), I was told was good, but I really cant find any information
on their funding levels, and research in this particular area.

Any good places in Canada, the home of Bombardier?

Devendra

Why University? (was:- Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

[%X]

Quoted text here. Click to load it

We see these requests for recommendations of good Universities quite often.
However, I don't see anyone asking about Apprenticeships in these areas. The
modern apprenticeship is very worthwhile training and means that a company
is funding the further education of the apprentice as well as providing on-
the-job training across a range of departments. That way apprentices get a
feel for the way a company works as well as getting good experience and
training in the subject of choice.

So why do youngsters with aspirations to engineering not consider
apprenticeships?

--
********************************************************************
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Why University?
Paul E Bennett escreveu:
[snipped]

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If the problem is like I see here, it is because the youngsters want to
do a term project in embedded and then go to jobs fair to get a position
in banking or 'business consulting' and continue the education with an
MBA. . .

--
Cesar Rabak
GNU/Linux User 52247.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Why University? (was:- Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Because when you then want to _change_ companies, the HR person whose job
it is to throw out 99 of 100 resumes has one less reason to throw out
yours.

--
www.wescottdesign.com

Re: Why University? (was:- Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

As one who went through the apprenticeship route I can testify that changing
companies, once indentured and completed the apprenticeship, is never
usually that much of a problem.  

As for doing Phd courses from within the apprenticeship, a couple of the
apprentices I have has the pleasure of mentoring are doing just that.

--
********************************************************************
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Why University? (was:- Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research)
Quoted text here. Click to load it

All I can say is that things are far different here in the US.
I know a few people who've worked their way to an "engineer"
position without a university degree.  They've got 0% chance of
moving to an equivalent position an another company.  Without a
"BS" on your resume, it goes straight into the bin.  That's
even true at the companies where they currently work: nobody
could come into their position from the outside without a
degree.

--
Grant Edwards                   grante             Yow! I like the way ONLY
                                  at               their mouths move ...  They
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Why University? (was:- Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The question was about places for PhD research!

This is the classic British confusion between education and training,
which has done so much damage to our University system over the past 30
years.

Both are a good thing, but they are not the *same* thing. A PhD is
primarily education, an apprenticeship is primarily training.

Some engineering companies combine apprenticeships with sponsorship for a
bachelors degree, thus getting the best of both worlds. I imagine it
could happen for a PhD as well, although I've never met anyone who has
done this.


Jeremy

Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research
Lui Sha works in this area at UIUC.  Funding for the types of projects you
are interested in doesn't appear to be a problem here.  Actually, funding
in general isn't a problem here.  Note that I am a 4th year Ph.D. student
in the CS department at UIUC and have had the pleasure of working with all
three members of the real-time faculty, Lui Sha included.


---Matthew Hicks


Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research

Quoted text here. Click to load it

In the UK, most PhDs in this field are funded by the Engineering and
Physical Sciences Council. They'll pay fees and a maintenance grant if
you are ordinarily resident in the UK and fees only for non-resident EU
nationals. Each university department has a number of EPSRC studentships,
which they can award as they see fit. See http://www.epsrc.ac.uk /
PostgraduateTraining/StudentEligibility.htm for more information.

There are variants on this, including collaborative funding of
doctorates. You can also find out about these on the EPSRC website.

HTH,


Jeremy

Re: Good Universities for Embedded Systems Research
On Wed, 5 Aug 2009 18:15:15 -0700 (PDT), Devendra Rai

Quoted text here. Click to load it

   Have you read all the comp.risks archive? It's a lot, but much of
it is applicable to reliabllity, and I think it would be very
instructive.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

   Embedded systems seems to be 'hidden' as much in terms of not being
a flashy degree area for universities as well as the systems being
inside and part of other products. I might suggest looking at schools
that do research in things that contain embedded systems. Robotics is
the first thing that comes to mind (though perhaps I'm biased, I do a
lot of reading about robotics, so don't hesitate to look into other
areas such as aerospace/avionics). For robotics I've heard a lot about
CMU and (of course) MIT in the US (I have no clue about Europe). I
don't know if either would be your best choice, but no doubt you could
do a lot worse.

   Are there actual degree programs in embedded systems thesedays? I
suppose you can get a PhD in whatever you can get a school and advisor
to approve of, but I'm thinking of Bachelor's degrees. Perhaps the
closest degree program I've heard of is Mechatronics which is a
mixture of EE, ME and IT/embedded, and includes robotics but also more
mundane electromechanical/computer-controlled devices. And of course
your choice of school does not neccesarily need to offer such a degree
program.

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Site Timeline