standing waves

We know what standing waves look like, on a string, or EM waves in a cavity.

But what's the mathematical definition of a standing wave? Does to have to include nodes, where the amplitude is always zero? And fixed end points? Can it be 2-D, or 3-D?

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Rich
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RichD
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Waves (as solutions to a wave equation) are standing waves when they have a recurring state (i.e. when they always return to a prior configuration). It's easy to do this with a box made of mirrors, and the mirrors are nodes in a sense, but it can also be done with other propogation-of-waves conditions. Standing-wave solutions are the resonances of bell, for instance.

A bell resonance is a three-D standing wave. The physical bell has some thermalization (the sound dies away), so it's not a perfect standing wave solution.

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whit3rd

** Standing waves on a drum skin are interesting:

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And so is the math....

.... Phil

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Phil Allison

a wave that fills a space with no energy being transferred by it

I would include ring lasers and surface waves on a droplet

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umop apisdn
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Jasen Betts

or a liquid tin droplet.

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John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc 
picosecond timing   laser drivers and controllers 
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John Larkin

"RichD" napisal w wiadomosci news: snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com...

Like this?

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Amplitude of what? The particles of medium always are moving (but the directions are different). So the amplitudes never are zero. S*

Reply to
szczepan bialek

;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

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Dr Philip C D Hobbs 
Principal Consultant 
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Reply to
Phil Hobbs

But that would include any oscillator, which doesn't sound right.

A bell is a 2-D surface, curved into a 3rd dimension, which leaves it still 2-D. Though of course it can support standing waves.

But still, it's an example, a picture. Given a ringing bell, what's the mathematical expression which defines 'standing wave'?

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Rich
Reply to
RichD

Maybe this is too simplistic, but in one dimension a standing wave is really two waves of the same frequency going in opposite directions. It 2 dimensions it gets more complicated, but a similar idea.

George H.

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George Herold

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