N. Cook

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I opened a Korg M1 keyboard the other day, to find a previous repairer had  
marked and written all over the PCB's.

Something along the lines of "N.Cook switches".  And various pen marks  
beside screws etc.

Was that you, N.Cook?



Gareth.



Re: N. Cook
On 10/05/2017 23:14, Gareth Magennis wrote:
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I mark ribbons and any reorientable screening and metalwork before  
disconnecting, thats about it, why would I "sign" my "work"?

Re: N. Cook
N_Cook wrote:

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It happens:

Doctor Carved His Initials Into Patient, Lawsuit Says

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/01/22/nyregion/doctor-carved-his-initials-into-patient-lawsuit-says.html


Re: N. Cook


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I found that signing and dating my repairs made it difficult for customers  
to present entirely different items as returns.  


Re: N. Cook
Ian Field wrote:

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** Recording serial numbers is the usual precaution against that one.  

   Plus recent repair work is generally visible.  

    


....  Phil  

Re: N. Cook
On 5/11/2017 7:52 PM, Phil Allison wrote:
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If it's done right, it shouldn't be.


--  
Jeff-1.0
wa6fwi
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Re: N. Cook
Foxs Mercantile wrote:

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 Phil Allison wrote:
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**  Plus recent repair work is generally visible.
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** I've only come across this piece of asinine garbage once before - and the guy who said it was a total idiot.

Electronics repairs are NOT "invisible mending".  

It is a GOOD thing if repairs are visible, cos when you come across them then you know what was done.  

Trying to make them invisible is 100% ABSRUD.  


....  Phil  



Re: N. Cook
On 2017/05/11 7:31 PM, Phil Allison wrote:
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I think what the PP meant was you clean up the solder flux, etc.

One group of folks that might want repairs to be 'invisible' are the  
collectors of ancient radio gear. They often want to hide replacement  
capacitors in the original package. I can understand that, and will do  
it if any customers asked (and charge for the extra time) but hasn't  
happened so far. Then again if I was restoring my 1920's battery powered  
RCA Radiola (w/WD11 tubes) I would likely hide the modern caps that way  
too...

John :-#)#

--  
(Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)
John's  Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9
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Re: N. Cook
John Robertson wrote:
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** Does not make repairs invisible - merely tidy.  


 BTW; PP = previous poster is a new one to me.  

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** That is restoration work - not repairs.  

Repairers are free to use substitute components and generic types in lieu of  the originals. To make an electronic repairs on consumer or most professional electronic invisible would take an extraordinary effort and result in unacceptable cost.

For no good purpose.  


....  Phil  




Re: N. Cook
On Friday, May 12, 2017 at 12:28:00 AM UTC-4, Phil Allison wrote:
To make an electronic repairs on consumer or most professional electronic i
nvisible would take an extraordinary effort and result in unacceptable cost
.
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Well I guess it all comes down to what the definition of "invisible" is (an
d I'll not ask Bill Clinton..).

Most of my work is surface mount work, and other than the area of rework lo
oking cleaner than the rest, my work is nearly imperceptible, but not on pu
rpose.

I use a lot of flux installing a flat pack IC to insure excellent solder fl
ow out and I always clean the area thoroughly with a fiber brush and aceton
e.  Yes, the cleaning makes the repair mostly invisible but it allows me to
 eye-loupe the repair looking for any solder bridges, unsoldered connection
s, or questionable connections, and it takes seconds to accomplish.

Re: N. Cook
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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** Wot a pedanict prick.  

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** Really - that must be really boring.  

 You do realise how rare it is for repairers to do SMD work ?  



...... Phil  

Re: N. Cook

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I don't think too rare.  Much of my repair work is SMD components.  

Your not going to find too many through-hole components in professional video cameras these days...

The same goes for high end touring gear as well.  While there are "standard" components, much is SMD these days.

Dan

Re: N. Cook
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
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 ** It is very rare.


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** Not the point.  

Faulty SMD boards are replaced, not repaired, cos the latter is normally too expensive or impossible to do.  


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** Could you be more ambiguous?  

You obviously work in a very special area and with lots of help from manufacturers.  

In the real world, the manufacturer is in China and supplies no help at all.  



....  Phil  
  



Re: N. Cook
On Friday, May 12, 2017 at 8:51:25 PM UTC-4, Phil Allison wrote:
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too expensive or impossible to do.  
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You do what you have to do to live Phil.  A lot of the boards I work on are
 for consumer level TV, and with the price erosion of the last few years, I
 can't afford to pay more for a board than a customer is willing to spend i
n total for a repair.  I can replace an AS15F gamma IC on an LCD TCON board
 in 10 minutes tops, and you'd have to look *very* carefully to see that it
 was replaced.  I buy them 50 at a shot out of China for less than 0.50 eac
h.

There are some boards that defy repair and those need to be replaced, but t
hey are usually a break even deal at best, so we do whatever we can to avoi
d replacements.


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ll.  
  
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True.  No schematics, no .bin files, no help. But we adapt by utilizing the
 datasheets for the ICs on the boards.  Fortunately, manufacturers no longe
r deface ICs and/or put house numbers on them, so using the "typical" circu
it topology provided by the chip maker goes a long way in replacing the mis
sing schematic.

Every main board that has a 25 series eeprom gets the .bin file removed, re
ad, and stored on my computer (and backed up to half a dozen flash drives).
 A lot of main boards just have corrupted firmware, and I can pull an eepro
m, reprogram it, and get it back on the board in 10 minutes.

I love getting guitar amps in because the guys want them back right away an
d don't care a lot about cost.  It's nice to work on parts that I don't nee
d to wear opti-visors to repair.

I do the occasional "antique" tube radio because it's a lot of fun to bring
 these old timers back to life.


Re: N. Cook
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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 ** And crucially no spare ICs are sold, only whole PCBs.  

   What YOU claim YOU sometimes do is unheard of in this country.  

   Cos it is completely uneconomic.



....  Phil  



Re: N. Cook
On Friday, May 12, 2017 at 10:38:26 PM UTC-4, Phil Allison wrote:
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I don't know what you're working on, but there is *rarely* an IC that can't
 be bought on Aliexpress.  I also buy LED chips for flat TVs a thousand at  
a shot for $20.  Sometimes it takes a bit of time to identify these parts b
ut they are available, and manufacturers no longer remove the OEM's number  
and replace it with a house number (fortunately).


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I can't speak for anything in Australia, but I assume China ships to Oz, no
?

  
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Can't speak for your country, but the only way we make money over here is t
o replace at the smd component level.  It is the *only* economic way to rep
air over here.


Re: N. Cook
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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** There are massive numbers of them that cannot.  
  
  All the older stuff and anything programed for starters.  

  I do not service TVs.



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  ** Cut out he smartarse crap.  

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** Which, like I say, nobody here does and darn few elsewhere.  

  


....  Phil  

Re: N. Cook
On 14/05/17 07:35, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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I'm curious now - where is "over here"?.

I'm guessing your average wage is under $5/hour.


Re: N. Cook

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I don't think too rare.  Much of my repair work is SMD components.  

Your not going to find too many through-hole components in professional video cameras these days...

The same goes for high end touring gear as well.  While there are "standard" components, much is SMD these days.

Dan

Re: N. Cook


wrote in message  


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I don't think too rare.  Much of my repair work is SMD components.

Your not going to find too many through-hole components in professional  
video cameras these days...

The same goes for high end touring gear as well.  While there are "standard"  
components, much is SMD these days.

Dan



**********************************************************************************************



I am increasingly finding my work turning from linear PSU's and through hole  
components, to SMPS and SMD.
This is mostly MI and Pro Audio.


So, you adapt or die.
I now have a hot air station and a microscope.

I regularly replace SMD op-amps, multi pin flatpack USB and firewire IC's,  
and keep coming across new SMPS controllers.
With these, you can just download the datasheet, which usually gives you an  
advisory circuit on it's use, which is very often pretty much what the  
manufacturer used for his design.

Agreed, there is NO support from ANYTHING coming out of China.  No parts,  
nothing.


I struggled at first with all this, but actually quite like a challenge, and  
learning new things.
And I have learnt a lot.



I would suggest anyone needing to make the leap from old school to current  
school check out Louis Rossmann videos on Youtube.
He mostly repairs Apple laptops, all SMD.
You don't have to like him, or his methods, but watch his videos and you  
will learn some skills you can adapt and put into good practice in your own  
world.


I have.




Gareth.









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