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Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



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All of them...
--
As we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should
be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
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Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze


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6 moths ago I couldn't speel Injuneer, now I is one!
:-)

Cheers Don...





--
Don McKenzie

Site Map:            http://www.dontronics.com/sitemap
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Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



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Don it was tested as well as ME, only I think if you apply that to a human.
I am in worse shape.

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Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze


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Because they can and because they appear to be only licensing it
royalty free for certain classes of devices. That is to say certain
ones that don't compete with the thing they developed it for which
appears to be wireless keyboards and mice.

-p
--
Paul Gotch
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Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



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 Why am I expecting cheap Chinese gear to start appearing with this idea
soon? :-)


 On a technically related subject, one problem that comes to mind, is
I've seen suitable-for-tagging rechargeable batteries, untagged, but
with rather flat "nipple" ends as you would normally expect.

 However, I've seen them being sold every so often as-is (untagged).

 This idea would preclude this type of battery from being used, because
the nipple end would short across both the contacts.
 However, if the primary market is wireless keyboards and mice, I'm
guessing most are going to use normally structured alkalines rather than
rechargeables.

Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze


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yeh, someday the tolerances won't be quite right the battery will
short and set
something on fire,
a clever idea but I'm not sure it will work

-Lasse

Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



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 You could always state no NiCads or NiMhs, and once the market sees
that, sales will bottom out.  Believe it or not, there ARE people out
there who use rechargeable cells you know.

 I've always seen that as a cheap cop-out.  It's a cheap design that
can't deal with the lower nominal voltages of rechargeable cells, and an
even cheaper cop-out when you're precluding those types because your
brilliant idea could cause a fire.

 Don't get me wrong, it's an apparently simple idea that would well most
of the time.

 It's just unfortunate that "most of the time" doesn't translate to
always.  Kinda like designers who use the "typical" spec, rather than
the actual tolerance - and get an odd batch of components that are still
within spec, just not so close enough to make the thing work.

 I can hear the complaints - "I bought batteries from XYZ and they've
worked for me for all my devices.  With InstaLoad, all they did was get
hot and melt the plastic.  Why is Microsoft not replacing my fried device?"

 If "you're holding it wrong" works for Apple, then I suppose "you've
inserted them wrong" will also work for MS.

 He with the highest paid lawyers, wins.  Indeed.

Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



"John Tserkezis"

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** Sanyo " N600AA "  Ni-Cd cells are made like this  - the plus button is 7
mm in diameter instead of the usual 5.5mm.


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** I doubt it would do that as the button contact is recessed behind the end
contact.

What  WOULD  likely happen is worse, soon as the cell is installed it will
be SHORTED end to end   -  cos the "InstaLoad" scheme requires the two
button and two end contacts for EACH cell to be linked together.


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** Irrelevant to the serious hazard of placing a dead short on a AA Ni-Cd
cell.

Expect 50 amps or more current resulting in burnt PCB tracks, smoke and
flames from any PVC coated wires and a possible explosion or fire in the
battery compartment in a few seconds.

Another and far more insidious outcome is that folk will get the idea that
cell polarity is a thing of the past and  FAIL  to pay attention to it when
loading cells into devices made the normal way.

THAT alone is enough reason to ban the silly idea.



...  Phil





Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



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 I brought this up in another message in this thread.  Relying on a
"typcial" rather than a larger scope of what you get out there in Real
Life isn't a good idea.

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 More so, the selling point that the user doesn't *have* to pay
attention to polarity wouldn't work.

 We've become so accustomed to polarity sensitive devices, that we
*actively* look out for the little symbols, be they icons, or +- characters.
 If you come across this and are not aware of "instaload", you'll spend
MORE time than need be looking for symbols that are not there.

Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



"John Jerkezis"

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** Sanyo " N600AA "  Ni-Cd cells are made like this  - the plus button is 7
mm in diameter instead of the usual 5.5mm.


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** I doubt it would do that as the button contact is recessed behind the end
contact.

What  WOULD  likely happen is worse, soon as the cell is installed it will
be SHORTED end to end   -  cos the "InstaLoad" scheme requires the two
button and two end contacts for EACH cell to be linked together.

Expect 50 amps or more current resulting in burnt PCB tracks, smoke and
flames from any PVC coated wires and a possible explosion or fire in the
battery compartment in a few seconds.

Another and far more insidious outcome is that folk will get the idea that
cell polarity is a thing of the past and  FAIL  to pay attention to it when
loading cells into devices made the normal way.

THAT alone is enough reason to ban the silly idea.



...  Phil





Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



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Can you see anybody buying a product because of this USP?

I can't.

It's a nice gimmick, but not one that translates into money IMHO.

tim



Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze


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It would elminate warranty returns by people who've put batteries in the
wrong way. Equipment damaged that way wouldn't usually be covered by
warranty, but just determining that that was the cause of the failure
costs money.

Sylvia.


Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



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do you think that anybody returns a 9.99 mouse under the warranty?

tim

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Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze


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Where does it say that this is limited to use in mouses costing $9.99?

Sylvia.

Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze


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Most battery compartments are constructed so that only the positive
nipple can contact the positive terminal. The cost is a fractuion of a
cent's worth of plastic to build hedges either side of the +ve contact.




Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze


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At least MS appear to be willing to license it.  Unlike Apple's
MagSafe*, for example.

*Apple's magnetically attached laptop power cords, which are a great
idea - who hasn't accidentally yanked on the power cord of their
laptop?

Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



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Leverage. Royalty free, aka you can just have it, but we get a dodgy
patent that it is not in the financial interest of anyone to challenge.
From this we can build  other dodgy patents that will earn them  real
money.

Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze


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It's stick they can beat smaller players with to get the smaller
players to share patents, or profits, with Microsoft.
It doesn't matter if the patent is invalid or not unless you have
enough money to stand up to M$ in court.

It's not the first time they've been granted an invalid patent.

If someone had come to me and said "I want a battery holder that will
accept an AA cell inserted in either direction and correct the polarity"
I'd have designed something similar, but possibly in different
materials.

One thing's I've seen before is they gave it a name that has very
little to do with what the technology does. Was "Rightway" taken?



Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze


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Wow, microsoft develops a solution for a problem that doesn't exist.
What a waste of money.

Re: New Microsoft Tech Makes Battery Changes a Breeze



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 We've been conditioned to how things are for a bloody long time, so, to
be fair, the problem *does* exist, it's just that it's not a very big
problem.

 The cost verses benefit thing is skewed against their favour.  So
they've picked the lowest possible cost for a problem that most people
perceive as negligible.  No surprise it's a costless royalty.

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