Raspberry Pi 2 power supply (PSU)

The following PSU looks good, especially as it has a separate lead, but
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I see it is specified as 5.35V at 2A but according to Wikipedia USB
power should be up to 5.25V. Not sure why the difference.
Although you may not have used that one, can you recommend any other PSU
for the PI 2B?
BTW, I found another one which purports to be from The Pi Hut but
according to some comments customers have received ones which are rated
at 1.8A instead of 2A.
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James
Reply to
James Harris
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Try this:
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Chris Elvidge, England
Reply to
Chris Elvidge
It probably allows them to ship it with a cable that barely contains any copper, and the voltage drop will still be within spec.
Theo
Reply to
Theo Markettos
I'm using one of these:
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For use with Pi B and 2 TB USB harddrive set up as a medi player. The spin up demand of the HD and boot demand of the Pi couldn't be met by any 2 A supplies or chargers I tried.
I've tested this one and you can pull > 3 A from any single port but at that level of current the voltage has dropped to the lower limit for a Pi (4.75 V?). But then it is sold as a charger not a PSU...
Also be aware that USB cables are not all created equal. Some have very little copper in and at the higher current levels can drop a significant amount of voltage.
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Cheers 
Dave.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
Just get the official one:
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and be happy.
Gordon
Reply to
Gordon Henderson
Until the device goes into power save mode and doesn't draw enough current to create a significant drop. Don't forget tolerances.
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These are my opinions.  I hate spam.
Reply to
Hal Murray
Yes, but overvolting by 100mV isn't a major problem. Undervolting is.
Theo
Reply to
Theo Markettos
This one's good as well
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Reply to
A. Dumas
Can anyone recommend something for the US market? I'm not talking just about the AC plug, but the shipping. It's got to be cheaper to buy something in the US than from the UK. But then I've bought stuff from China for $1 including shipping. I expect the shipping was the lion's share of the costs on that one.
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
If tjhere's nothing specific to the Pi I would be looking to a general electronics shop (Radio Shack?) for a 5 volt PSU of at least 3 and ideally 5 amp output. Then work out how to get the power into the pi - there's a choice of the microUSB, one of the normal USBs or GPIO pins. It's possible to buy leads with a usb socket at one end and tails at the other, which I use to power a pi with a damaged microUSB - power in to a standard USB.
Just make sure the PSU is regulated.
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Alan Adams, from Northamptonshire 
alan@adamshome.org.uk 
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Reply to
Alan Adams
It wasn't .
Reply to
Gordon Levi
I'm not sure what you are saying. The item I am talking about is a $1 item. The item mentioned here is a $6 item with $1.50 shipping. Clearly $1.50 is more than $1.
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
I should have drawn your attention to the comments which explain why the shipping was not a significant part of the cost of your item. They say that both the Chinese government and the USPS subsidise the postage costs.
Reply to
Gordon Levi
A PSU which has an integral figure-8/zip wire to the micro-USB plug (rather than using a real USB cable) will be much better for copper size. (They may not work as USB chargers for other appliances due to lack of the current indicating voltage levels on the data lines, but the Pi doesn't care about those anyway.)
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Andrew Gabriel 
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
Yes, I read that although I take that sort of stuff with a grain of salt. Still, why would the shipping for a $1 item be less than the shipping for a $6 item? That's what I am not following.
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Rick
Reply to
rickman


The 5.35V voltage isn't a great issue, since the seller has already stated why it's a bit higher:
"- Due to our charger have a little bit higher voltage than many of the oth er standard chargers, it can provide enough power for the board and accesso ries, such as IR receivers, USB wifi adapters, and USB storage. This become s very important when overclocking the Raspberry Pi as many chargers may on ly feeds your Pi with about 4.7-4.9V."
Also:
"- 5.35V 2A output can overcome the voltage drop from most USB cables, and 2 amps provides plenty of power for many USB powered accessories."
As corrected mentioned by Theo Markettos.
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sak
Reply to
Arthur Moisés da Costa Borges

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