r-pi2 server?

Hi; I'm looking for something to replace an elderly i-386 system that's
provided firewall/lan router and sundry servers for my home network, and
which has finally died. The rpi2 looks a fair contender; however the
dead system ran freebsd, and ideally I'd want to run freebsd or
something similar on the replacement.
I gather that fbsd sort-of runs on the pi - but there's an issue noted
with the hdmi output - can anyone confirm this and suggest when (if?)
it's likely to be fixed?
Otherwise netbsd looks a contender, but their website is fairly vague
about running on the rpi (and multi-processor support looks an issue) -
does anyone have this running successfully (and a useful set of ports
such as apache)?
Any other useful thoughts on the subject welcome, thanks!
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
Harlow Essex England
Reply to
Mike Scott
Loading thread data ...
RPi2 only has one ethernet port. A decent firewall has two, one for the WAN and one for the LAN to keep "dirty" WAN packets off the LAN.
As a web server within the LAN for the LAN have a look at nginx I have that running on B functioning as a webcam. Still images but forum posts indicate it could be kicked into streaming.
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Cheers 
Dave.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
Yes, I know, but thanks for pointing it out. The dead system had two built-in ports plus a usb dongle, for two lan segments and one wan. The laptop that's currently hosting the gateway has its built-in port plus two usb dongles, a setup I'd need to replicate on a Pi. Neither dongle works at all well with nfs, which is an issue I'd need to check.
I've actually got a public-facing apache server. Runs a handful of php and perl scripts for the favoured :-)
My current thought is /two/ rpi's - one on the lan to provide the various servers: this would have root on the SD card, most stuff on a hard drive; a second, multi-homed, to provide firewall and nat, again root on SD but mounting some stuff from the first server (esp. /var). I'm thinking I could run both pi's plus a 2.5" hard drive from a single 2A psu.
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
Harlow Essex England
Reply to
Mike Scott
Debian aka Raspbian is fine, just as well as freebsd/netbsd for home use. But I wouldn't use a RPi because of its flaky (well, slow at least, but also had some problems on reboot) ethernet port.
Reply to
A. Dumas
I'm not keen on linux of any flavour for this, purely because I have a lot of scripts that assume a bsd-based system that would need a lot of work to transfer. (This particular hardware has been running pretty well 24/7 for 8 years; it was the 3rd bit of kit for the job; I reckon the system in its various incarnations must date back 15 years or more. You get an awful lot of clutter in that time!!)
Thanks for the warning about the ethernet port. I'll grub around for more info on that. Looks like a killer though.
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
Harlow Essex England
Reply to
Mike Scott
Anything further on the "flaky" ethernet? I use Raspbian/Pi as firewall/router/web server/email/rss downloader/radio downloader with a 3 3g dongle on USB. Often have to reboot (twice) to get both interfaces working. Having said that, I don't have to reboot very often.
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Chris Elvidge, England
Reply to
Chris Elvidge
This is actually where a *86 solution works best. ATOM ITX board perhaps with a couple of ethernet cards?
Or a beagle thing?
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the  
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. ? Erwin Knoll
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
There are some with dual gigabit ethernet on the M/B - my house server is one such (also has six SATA ports which is great for a small ZFS array). A Jetway board IIRC.
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Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun 
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Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
While it is true that there were issues early on with the USB drivers (and the on-board Ethernet is a USB device), these have been fixed now. If you still see issues, then please do report them.
USB is the issue with multiple Ethernet interfaces though - especially when routing, but it will depend on your broadband speed. up to 50Mb/sec and you should be OK - the Pi will susptain 98Mb/sec on it's on-board interface though - in one direction - it's the half duplex nature of USB that can start to cause issues when routing small packets back to back at full speeds.
However, unless I get fibre here my next SOHO router will be a Pi fitted with a 2nd USB Ethernet interface.
Gordon
Reply to
Gordon Henderson
Not really, although I did turn up
formatting link
which seems to suggest both inbuilt and usb work pretty well. Although others seem to have noted DOA hardware.
I'm tempted to buy one to try - probably the only way to be sure.
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
Harlow Essex England
Reply to
Mike Scott
I know. The present box is a 1GHz C7 jetway mini-itx that I put
fanless atom-based machine, I'm all ears. Nothing's cast in stone yet.
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
Harlow Essex England
Reply to
Mike Scott
I built one for that sort of money.
IIRC 250 inc. twin 500GB hard drives
Atom board was around 80 as was the case IIRC and 1GB of ram got me to a basic system - needed a temp DVD drive to boot and install linux.
there's an ATOM board being knocked out sub 40 quid here and there - old spec, but who cares?
Plenty of old PCS around too - a small ITX case is cheap enough too.
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the  
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. ? Erwin Knoll
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
formatting link

will do you anything you want and build it too - in wahtever case - suggest rackmount/fanless atom/smallest ram and sort your own SSD maybe and second ethernet card
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the  
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. ? Erwin Knoll
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Thanks for the info. So am I.
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Chris Elvidge, England
Reply to
Chris Elvidge
for
LAN.
Messy. B-)
You looked at the HP Microservers? Good value little boxes and with more grunt that a Pi, though that may not be an issue. Frequently
n
ethernet card and possible more HD's if you wanted RAID.
e
That might be pushing it at startup. A Pi B with 2 TB USB HD used as a media player wouldn't reliably boot with any of the 2 A supplies I have. The boot load and spinup requirements of the HD were too much for the PSU and the volts would drop below the point at which the drive could start reliably. If you waited until the Pi had booted and connected the USB HD it was 50:50 on the Pi crashing or the disc still not starting properly.
Found a USB charger that can deliver > 3 A an still (just) be within the voltage tolerance. That works, so does powering the USB and Pi from different PSUs.
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Cheers 
Dave.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
[]
RPi 2 is much more powerful than the "beagle thing" and doesn't create the RF interference which kills on-board GPS receivers....
Issues with the RPi's Ethernet port are generally over-stated, except for a few specialised applications.
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Cheers, 
David 
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Reply to
David Taylor
For this sort of application, try the following
formatting link

You would need to adapt one of the multiple output leads, but you get 5 volts (+-0.25) at up to 4 amps. Not bad for 13.47ukp incl VAT.
--
Alan Adams, from Northamptonshire 
alan@adamshome.org.uk 
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Reply to
Alan Adams
...
Ummm; tack a 5 on the url maybe :-)
Interesting thought. And the price seems to have dropped too. (There's also the cheaper
formatting link
which looks closely similar.
Thanks for the pointer - will bear in mind.
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
Harlow Essex England
Reply to
Mike Scott
I'd be looking at something like a VIA Epia to replace a 386, but I
one with a PCI slot (for a decent dual port network card) on eBay.
Reply to
Rob Morley
I have trouble with one B+ which is directly connected to my modem/router, port 3 of a Fritzbox 7360. Apparently that's not a good combination, almost every time on reboot the network interface doesn't come up. Headless; bothersome to reboot again, have to pull the plug. I tried all sorts of things, the power adapter is great, the B+ reboots fine when plugged into a different router, etc. Could be some sort of grounding or interference problem, I guess originating from the Pi. (But also, the modem or that port of the modem might be too picky.)
Reply to
A. Dumas

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