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Re: Lead-free Solder ( continued ... )

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Hi Ron. Setting aside the tongue-in-cheek angle, when you think about it, we
have always done this really, haven't we ? Certainly, whenever a piece of
kit comes into my shop, whilst fixing it, I will at least check all of "the
usual suspects" - regulators, external connectors, power resistors,
transformers etc, and often rework the joints on them anyway, 'just in
case', particularly if there is any indication that they might be poor. I
guess it would fall under the description of "preventive maintenance" ... ??

Arfa



Re: Lead-free Solder ( continued ... )
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I wonder how many small heatsinks I've added to TO220 ps pass transistors at
the same time as having to resolder the overheated joints.


--
Diverse Devices, Southampton, England
electronic hints and repair briefs , schematics/manuals list on
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Re: Lead-free Solder ( continued ... )
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Oh absolutely, but I don't agree with opening up an item of equipment
unnecessarily unless I`m sure that there`s an impending problem. We all
know the most common failings in our individual fields and I`ll go round
the usual suspects simply as part of the overall repair if only to help
insure against a bounce from a problem unrelated to the original fault.

  I certainly wouldn`t advertise such a service. Imagine, every tiny
thing that goes wrong from then on would be 'my fault' and obviously
would be under guarantee! (forever!)


Ron(UK)


--
Lune Valley Audio
Public Address Systems
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Re: Lead-free Solder ( continued ... )
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fair point



Re: Lead-free Solder ( continued ... )
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   No one said that "Routine maintenance" is "Free maintenance".  I
started several  "Routine maintenance" programs while in the US Army for
electronics equipment to reduce downtime.


--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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Re: Lead-free Solder ( continued ... )

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That's a good point. Lots of things of course have routine maintenance -
your car or house furnace for instance. Also, thinking about it, I get lots
of items in for repair with "please service" on the repair ticket. We all
know that in most cases that we get such a request, there's going to be very
little in there that can be 'serviced', but I suppose that doesn't stop us
pulling the lid off anyway, just to look ...

I guess that the difference with your army kit, or a furnace or car, is that
a need for some routine service work has been shown and proven, and that
makes it of genuine benefit. Because a routine maintenance program is the
norm for items like this in the civilian world, it is perfectly normal for
car repair shops to offer "10,000 mile service for $x" or for a plumber /
heating engineer to offer "annual furnace service $y". In the case of the
army electronics gear, I'm guessing that it's a combination of taking care
of known issues with the kit, which probably spawned the need for the
program in the first place, and 'belt and braces', to ensure that the kit is
ready for full active service when needed ...

Arfa





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  Military "Preventive maintenance" is done on mission critical
equipment.  We had over 300 vacuum tube 25" monochrome tv/video monitors
that were used for air traffic control, pilot ready rooms and classrooms
at Ft. Rucker's helicopter pilot training center.  We also maintained 17
CATV and CARS systems to link multiple airfields and other areas.  If
anything went down we had 15 minutes to find and repair the problem, or
the airfields were restricted to instrument rated pilots, only.  That
meant instructors, because any pilot who had finished training was
transferred somewhere else, usually Vietnam.  We had over 50 miles of
trunk, plus dozens of single channel microwave relay systems, and VERY
little spare equipment.  Some of the older systems had no spares left,
yet were allowed zero scheduled downtime for maintenance.  Its very
similar to being a TV broadcast engineer with studio and transmitter
sites scattered over a 50 mile range while trying your best for zero
downtime.


--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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