This just in!

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Tim Wescott 
Wescott Design Services 
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Tim Wescott
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Must be global warming.

Reply to
tm

Oh, good! I was so worried.

Reply to
John S

Pretty cool stuff.

A great experiment would be to take about ten exact sized funnels of the stuff, and place each in a different temperature chamber, and further refine their viscosity numbers.

At this level, I have doubts that vibration matters much. I guess the amplitude could play in at far lower velocities for allowing "wetting" action to creep along. That could be one of the chambers.

Reply to
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

There are deniers and there are those that base their opinions on science! :)

Reply to
Gonadicus

There's two of these experiments that I know of. The one at the University of Queensland is the oldest known on-going physics experiment, and was started by a prof in 1927 as a demo for his students. Apparently it lived in a closet for some decades before being put on display again.

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Then there's this Dublin one, which I didn't know of until I saw the above link in youtube.

The environments are pretty uncontrolled -- the drops take decades to fall; having ten environmental chambers going at once for a century may be a bit much to ask.

(You'd probably also want at least one in a vacuum, or in dry nitrogen: I'm sure that surface oxidation would have a role in the dynamics, given how long the system takes to evolve.)

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Tim Wescott 
Wescott Design Services 
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Tim Wescott

My family owns Seneca Caverns...

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I've always been amused by stalactites and stalagmites ;-) ...Jim Thompson

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| James E.Thompson                                 |    mens     | 
| Analog Innovations                               |     et      | 
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Jim Thompson

LOL Now, molasses in winter!

Reply to
WangoTango

snip link my ISP cans my post over...

Pretty cool stuff.

A great experiment would be to take about ten exact sized funnels of the stuff, and place each in a different temperature chamber, and further refine their viscosity numbers.

At this level, I have doubts that vibration matters much. I guess the amplitude could play in at far lower velocities for allowing "wetting" action to creep along. That could be one of the chambers.

Reply to
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

Only because you are old enough to have watched them form! ;-)

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Reply to
Michael A. Terrell

Not true, since the entire idea is to have a different ambient in each. They would each take less time than the standard 72 degree (here) ambient temp avg.

At some point, I would think that it tips toward not taking very long at all... days or hours even.

Well, the viscosity will not change as a result of the atmosphere around it. Should only be gravity involved... especially at these super high values.

I do not see oxygen affecting the pitch's exposed surface molecules much either.

Tar is likely going to have very little interaction with the air. It is such a dense matrix I would say that even if it did, it would be one of the thinnest layers of interaction known in nature.

Platinum and Gold are likely better, but they ARE solids and mono-metallic (single element) too.

Even hot and soft, it would likely be the hardest material known to successfully "stir" with a simple rod. A paddle, yes. A rod would simple drag through and leave the mix virtually undisturbed.

Are you familiar with that medium they use to stop arrows from penetrating a surface (armor)? It is like a fine powder where things seem a bit liquidous until the point makes incursion, and then it solidifies around the attempt to modify its matrix and stops the arrow point.

I have a feeling that tar would prove to be a molecular level "fine powder" matrix that stands appearing as a solid, but an arrow point would slowly make its way into the matrix. Amost the opposite effect, but really a slight variation of the same effect. Because tar will stop arrows too when it appears solid. it is the slow moving arrow that penetrates.

Reply to
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

If this is the one over by Natural Bridge, I have been there a couple times.

There is a general store over there on Tunnel Ridge Rd, IIR, and I won an antique K frame S&W 38 there in a raffle. Nice revolver.

Is that at the state park too? Looks like the Holiday Inn over there, but isn't, right?

I thought both terms used a "g". I guess I did not pay enough attention.

I like caves too.

Reply to
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

Then I qualify,

I would take Newt as my running mate from what I have been seeing lately.

Do not forget to vote.

Lack of that got us where we are.

Reply to
DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

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