Sous Vide Cooking

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  I know we have some cooks here, I read that a tight temp control
is important to Sous Vide cooking, but 0.1*C, that seems a little tight.

  I set up an experimental Sous Vide cooker today.
I used a temp controller, > https://tinyurl.com/yd4l87xz
and my wife's old, heavy duty deep fat fryer.
   The temp controller has a 0.3*C differential.
  I set it for 54.4*C, power turns on at 54.1*C and off at 54.4*C.
  However after power is off the temp continued to rise to 56.9*C.
There's a lot of hot iron in the fryer releasing heat. So I connected a  
hotplate in series with the fryer, basically lowered the fryer voltage  
to 52Vac.
This was better, the range reduced to 54.1*C to 55.0*C.  I will  
experiment some more with my variac and find the best voltage.
  I did cook a cheap sirloin tip steak the color was even, but a little  
more done than I want, but then my temp ran high, so expected.
  I cooked it for 1-1/2 hours.
It was a very thin steak, 5/8" to 3/4", but was evenly red top to  
bottom. I seared it 30 seconds on each side after Sous Vide.
    Anyone here tried Sous Vide, your comments?

                             Mikek


Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On 2017-12-21 16:08, amdx wrote:
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That sort of tight regulation requires more than simple on-off  
thermostat operation. You'll need a real PID control. Even some of the  
low-cost Chinese fridge controllers now have that, like the newer model  
of my first fermentation temp-control units.

Of course, this begs the question of how they measure the temperature.  
Forget simple NTCs or diodes, that's not going to be accurate. It would  
have to be a pricey IC. Otherwise you'll have something that seem to  
regulate to 54.1-54.4C but in reality it is 55.8-56.1C.


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Can't comment there, that's frou-frou stuff to us Wild-West barbecuers :-)

I like steak pink inside but almost black and crunchy on the outside.

--  
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On 12/21/2017 6:20 PM, Joerg wrote:
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   That would be Ok, after a couple of times cooking you would know, that
when it says 54*C you need 52*C, because your system measures low.
  I think I can get the range limited after a little experimentation  
with a variac.
Here's a picture. > https://www.dropbox.com/s/1v6qjsuxisik0aa/Steak.jpg?dl=0
  Just a bit more done than I wanted.
                         Mikek







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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On 22/12/17 01:19, amdx wrote:
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You have to be very cautious with sous vide cooking,
since it is a careful balance between "denaturing"
proteins and killing pathogens. Get it wrong and some
pathogens will thrive.

There is quantitative information on that kind of
thing in "Cooking for Geeks: Real Science, Great
Cooks, and Good Food" by Jeff Potter
The title is pleasingly accurate :)


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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On Friday, December 22, 2017 at 11:20:44 AM UTC+11, Joerg wrote:
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.
  
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An "interchangable" NTC thermistor is more expensive than a regular thermis
tor, but not much. Back in 1993 we bought Betatherm parts that were interch
angeable to 0.2 degree Celcius, and Yellow Spring Instruments sold even tig
hter spec parts which were appreciably more expensive.

At the time, integrated circuit temperature sensors were less accurate, and
 more expensive.

Any of them can be calibrated at a single point - a well stirred ice bath (
with the water being pushed through the bed of ice) is zero degrees Celcius
 to within about a millidegree Celcius - and will be accurate to close to t
hat millidegree over the cooking temperature range.

I've seen more recent ads for more accurate digital parts, but they tend to
 be noisier and have more self-heating than a good quality thermistor.

You do have to a take care not to dissipate too much power in the thermisto
r - I've seen the resistance start to wander around at 1mW. 10uW is conserv
ative, and 100uW is probably going to be okay.

Sloman A.W., Buggs P., Molloy J., and Stewart D. ?A microcontroller
-based driver to stabilise the temperature of an optical stage to 1mK in th
e range 4C to 38C, using a Peltier heat pump and a thermistor sensor?
? Measurement Science and Technology, 7 1653-64 (1996)  

Sloman A. W. ?Comment on ?A versatile thermoelectric temper
ature controller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute accuracy?
?? [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 126107 (2009)] ?, Review of Scientif
ic Instruments 82, 27101 - 027101-2 (2011)

<snip>

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On Thursday, December 21, 2017 at 7:20:44 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
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I was thinking it's more like pot roast* which is also nice this time of  
year.  It still get's seared on the outside before going into the pot.  

George H.  

*or roast beef, If ever in Buffalo, forget chicken wings,
have the Beef on Weck, (Kimmelweck) with a good helping of  
Miller's horseradish.  
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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
Den fredag den 22. december 2017 kl. 01.20.44 UTC+1 skrev Joerg:
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and circulation of the water, a common one is a stick you clamp to the side of a pot and it has the heater and a pump inside

https://www.conrad.com/medias/global/ce/0000_0999/0700/0770/0778/1434398_AB_00_FB.EPS_1000.jpg

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https://youtu.be/JB1x0O-bhrw

Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On 12/22/2017 3:54 AM, Lasse Langwadt Christensen wrote:
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That's the video that got me stated on this whole thing.
                                      Mikek

Re: Sous Vide Cooking
amdx wrote...
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 The exact location of the temp sensor is critical.


--  
 Thanks,
    - Win

Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On Thursday, December 21, 2017 at 7:08:18 PM UTC-5, amdx wrote:
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I can't believe that a few degrees (F or C) one way or the other would make  
that much difference.  (This is meat, in a bag, in a water bath, right?)
I've never done that.  If you wanted to set some average temperature,  
you could turn the set point down a bit (~1/2 the overshoot)
maybe a degree or so.  

George H.      

Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On 22/12/17 03:27, George Herold wrote:
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It does make a difference - both to the culinary
result (different proteins change at different
temperatures) and safety (need to kill pathogens).


Re: Sous Vide Cooking
George Herold wrote:
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I never tried sous vide, but a medium-rare steak should be 130-135 F in  
the center, and I find 135 F to be a little over-done.  That's only 2.5  
degrees C.  In very slow cooking (which sous vide is) the temp of the  
water is the same as in the center of the meat.




Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On 12/23/2017 11:54 AM, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
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   Yes, the wisdom of the internet is 130*F for a rare steak.

We cooked one frozen (then thawed) rib-eye steak last night using sous  
vide. It had very little red to it. Very disappointed, and not sure if  
the freezing had anything to do with it or not. The flavor was good
it just wasn't rare in appearance,
  I got the temp regulated very well by using 28 Volts on my fryer, and  
a temp regulator. My daughter brought her thermometer and they agreed  
within a tenth or two of a degree F. Cooked it 2 hrs at 130* F.
  I'll be trying a fresh Rib-eye next time.
The second sirloin tip I Sous Vide on Thursday will be seared tomorrow  
(Monday) just to see how the hold up after 4 days in the fridge.

                              Mikek


Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On 24/12/17 23:59, amdx wrote:
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Caution: that isn't high enough to kill all pathogens.
For example, according to the FDA, Bacillus Cereus
survives at that temperature.

Apparently the FSIS food guidelines state you should
  - get the food above 136F within a 2hour window
  - hold it there long enough to pasteurise it
  - poultry should be 165F

I presume you were using your fryer as a water bath,
and keeping the water away from the food. If not,
then it isn't actually sous vide.

Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On 12/24/2017 6:31 PM, Tom Gardner wrote:
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  I am.
        Mikek

Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On Sunday, December 24, 2017 at 6:59:33 PM UTC-5, amdx wrote:
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It might be the frozen part that killed the red color.  
I like to let my steak warm up for 1-2 hours  
out of the frig. before I cook it, let the whole thing come up to  
room temp.  I usually crush up a few  
garlic cloves and smear them on the top(s) as it warms.  
If you don't want to fire up a grill then pan fry it.  
I get my case iron 12" skillet nice and hot, with some  
grease/ fat.  (I use bacon fat) Now sear the steak  
on all it's edges, if it's got a fat side (like a strip
steak) then I'll set it on the edge of the pan and let  
that cook/rend, maybe turn the heat down to 1/2 for this.
With all the edges seared, let it cook at lower heat (~1/2)
till it's how you like it. (You can sorta tell by poking,
I'll cut one open.)

I'm going to make a pot roast tomorrow. :^)  
    
George H.

Re: Sous Vide Cooking
On Thursday, December 21, 2017 at 7:08:18 PM UTC-5, amdx wrote:
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I smell "arbitrary precision".  :)

A friend loaned me his new (probably overpriced?) Sous Vide appliance.  This weekend, I hope to try some salmon via the Sous Vide method.

Reason:  Outdoor grill is a PITA to clean.
Yeah, I could use foil or planks, but who has time for that?
Not to mention my outdoor gas grill is quite old, in general disrepair, and really doesn't cook evenly anymore.  (Probably time for a new one.)
And cooking fish indoors via other methods can smell up the house, and/or lead to unpredictable results (i.e., microwave).

The truth is that while I'm (more than) a decent cook overall, I'm pretty lazy when it comes to broiled/grilled fish.  I have high hopes for this Sous Vide thing.  We'll see...

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