Rigol scope settings

I have a shiny new Rigol DS1102E on the bench that I'm trying to set up to view transmissions on an i2c bus. There's a burst of data on the bus about once a second that I'd like to look at.

Pretty sure some folks here are familiar with this series and have probably used it for this purpose before; can you recommend some settings to capture that effectively on this scope? I know, RTFM and all but the included "Quick Start" guide doesn't give enough info to help, and jeez the full manual (available only as PDF) is nearly 200 pages long.

Reply to
bitrex
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Apologies for any formatting issues on the above post ;-)

Reply to
bitrex

I have the DS2072A. Assuming it's similar (enough), I believe the SDA goes on CH-1, and SCL on CH-2. Then, go into the Decode menu. Serial. Then I2C.

The above is from memory, fading fast this time of evening. :) Good luck. Nice scope for the money!

Reply to
mpm

200 pages? I've just bought a wristwatch with a thicker manual than that!
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Reply to
Cursitor Doom

DS1054Z + the hack is even better.

Best regards, Piotr

Reply to
Piotr Wyderski

I don't think the series the 1102E is from has any protocol decoding functionality, best I can hope for is to set it up the holdoff/timebase appropriately so it triggers consistently on the burst pattern I guess

Reply to
bitrex

Counting the forty languages. ;-)

Reply to
krw

I had similar trouble with Rigol's DS1074z and got some good advice from the people on this news group. If you can find a historical listing, try searching for "Rigol DS1074Z" & my name. January of 2016 roughly.

Hul

bitrex wrote:

Reply to
Hul Tytus

I know nothing of i2c, but how 'bout setting 'scope for single shot and f'ing around with the time base and memory depth until you can see what you want.

George H.

Reply to
George Herold

you know, I've always tried to keep my manuals with the equipment, and I am sure you try to practice the same, hows the arm holding out?

Jamie

Reply to
M Philbrook

WIth my Rigass, I get the time base knob to lock at the start of the burst somewhere on the screen, move the cursor over to it then push the time base button in and start expanding that burst. Basically its like the Delay trigger.

You can adjust thge screen to get a good snap shot of it then use the save functions so you can view it greater details later.

Jamie

Reply to
M Philbrook

Thanks, will give that a try. I've been messing around with the "Auto" function on the panel; for many measurements it seems next to useless.

Reply to
bitrex

Ya, I find myself missing my old Kik sometimes when using this one for single-shot type measurements. The low-end Rigol DSO is great for storage/snapshots/looking at detail but for long timebases the analog scope seemed superior; its delayed sweep and holdoff controls were bang-on accurate. First thoughts were "Ugh, I wish I'd sprung for a DSO with more memory." Sometimes I got confused as to whether the i2c bus was even functioning because I was having trouble finding the burst in the long periods of it doing nothing in the DSO memory, that's a breeze with the analog.

Wonder if I could link the two somehow, the Kik (once its PSU problem is fixed) has a bunch of outputs on the back. Use the analog for the "big picture" and the DSO to see the detail

Reply to
bitrex

use a logic analyser?

Reply to
Lasse Langwadt Christensen

That should be dead simple with a DSO. Can't you set your Rigol to "trigger" wherever you want in memory - at least at the middle? Just trigger on SDA going low, then you can look both forward in backward "in time" from the trigger point. If you're looking at a single transaction, this should work but if there is a lot of traffic on the bus and you need to capture it all, an Aardvark is usually a better tool than a scope.

You can probably do such a thing but I think you need to understand your scope better. That said, more memory is better. Always spend the couple of bucks on as much memory as you can get.

Reply to
krw

Does anyone use those anymore? I don't think I've used one in 25 years.

Reply to
krw

.com:

O

e

is

some scopes have it as an option, and you can get a lot of channels/memory depth for next to nothing and it can be a great tool for tracing code

debug a spi bus and you have already run out of analog channels on most sco pes

Reply to
Lasse Langwadt Christensen

If you want to monitor the I2C bus, get one of these:

formatting link

It will do other formats also.

Google Saleae for the free software.

Reply to
tom

You know what is still somewhat useful? One of those logic probe "pens".

Example: B&K Precision Model DP-52

formatting link

Although, an older model I have is "better" even though it tops out at 20 MHz. If you're doing low-speed testing/troubleshooting, and you're willing to assume that "most stuff" doesn't suffer fatal problems, you can really hunt down problems quickly with one of these.

Like: Is the clock running? Check. Is the output latched correctly. Check. Next

Reply to
mpm

Sure, but does anyone really use them? I don't think we even have one in the building. I've never seen one, anyway.

It depends on what one's trying to fix. If you're looking at signal integrity, a two channel scope is usually enough. If you're trying to see what the software droid is really sending, a bus analyzer (Aardvark, or some such thing) is a better tool than a generalized logic analyzer.

Reply to
krw

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