If there's a wifi or wireless connection nearby is it moral to tap in and use it?

In fact that is precisely what the XP SP2 wireless wizard allows.
Using a thumb drive too.
Reply to
Rod Speed
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True but you can break out of the wizard. What Deadly suggests is that you have to use it ( I think)
PCs are sold as being as safe and easy as a toaster. WiFi is not and the average punter does not know that and is not told.
They are told not to write their PIN number on their CC etc. but not told that they have effectively done it by firing up an unsecured network using the MS inbound-only FW.
Reply to
Colin ®
Thanks Rod, got it.
Colin
Reply to
Colin ®
Don't forget that a WiFi signal can be tracked just like any other radio signal. At those frequencies it wouldn't be very hard to track the signal to the offenders location.
Reply to
Martin
Wrong - it's still break & enter.
Wrong - it's still private property. It's still illegal to enter private property without permission or legal excuse...
You need to go do your security course again.....
Reply to
Martin
Your an idiot, go do your security course again (besides "bouncers" really shouldn't be classed as security)..
In NSW it's the "Inclosed Lands Protection Act", which states:
(1) Any person who, without lawful excuse (proof of which lies on the person), enters into inclosed lands without the consent of the owner, occupier or person apparently in charge of those lands, or who remains on those lands after being requested by the owner, occupier or person apparently in charge of those lands to leave those lands, is liable to a penalty not exceeding: (a) 10 penalty units in the case of prescribed premises, or (b) 5 penalty units >If you leave your house unlocked and someone comes in thats not illigal
You are WRONG (in NSW anyway, not going to start looking at laws in other states/territories).
And, there is NO "Tresspass Act" in Commonwealth law, so your "knowledge" is WRONG! I suggest you go back and redo any security course you think you did.. If you were in NSW you should've failed 'cause you need to know the Inclosed Lands Protection Act by name and what it means...
And as for knowing for sure, considering I have arrested more than one person under this Act, and the Police have had a successful prosecution, I'm fairly confident that I know what this Act meant.. How about you?
Oh, and please tell us where you work as a "bouncer" 'cause I for one would like to avoid that place if this is the level of knowledge the security staff have on the laws!
Reply to
Martin
Martin wrote
Not break, just enter.
Correct.
There's a reason its a bouncer...
Reply to
Rod Speed
He's just another moron that slept through his security course and got past simply because he paid his fee. Knowing about the various "incosed lands" acts and tresspass is basic in every security course and as he claims to be a "bouncer" he would've had to do such a course.....
Reply to
Martin
Do you even know the definition of "break" in break & enter???
Reply to
Martin
Colin ® wrote
Sure, but he didnt say it had to be mandatory to use it.
Cant see where he said anything like that. He appeared to be saying that most users dont turn decent security on because they decide that its too hard, and that using a thumb drive would make it easy enough for even the stupidest user to do.
That is precisely what the XP SP2 wireless wizard does using a thumb drive.
Bullshit.
My latest wireless laptop certainly does tell them.
So does MS too.
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Bullshit they have.
Reply to
Rod Speed
Bullshit right back - that's the whole sales push. Internet anywhere anytime with turkeys in airports and under trees in a park doing business in the TV ads.
Well my 6 month old VIAO may have ( can't remember) but it sure went on line without enforcing any security or any flag waving.
Average punter remember - that's the peanut who buys a lappie because the droid says it's best. They never go near sites that would help them ( That one is good - thanks)
Expecting anything more of average users other than getting it working is a dream.
Shit, half the PCs I fix don't even have A/V or they are a year out of date. People just don't know.
Reply to
Colin ®
Go ahead and use it. They wouldn't be able to prove who was tapping into it.
Reply to
pony
geez, calm down buddy.
Clearly the law on this is a little loose. It says the trespasser can prove it had an excuse for being in there without consent. If the doors are open, then you would have a good case for saying that there is implied consent for you to be on the property. Like any shop or complex. If it is a house, then you would just say you were trying to get hold of the occupier to talk to them. Clearly, unless they can show you had malicious or dubious intent, you will be fine.
As for the analogy to the wireless network, if a network springs up on a wifi list, the unsophisticated user would not know whether it is public or private network. No different to a website owner saying its site is off limits and not having any access control. A bit like having a shop with open doors, and then the owner saying, "I never gave you consent to enter."
The idea that access a network counts as "trespass" has not been accepted by the law. Statutes are used to protect networks.
Reply to
pony
You mean like driving slowly past people's houses. Nice one!
Reply to
pony
Colin ® wrote
Still total bullshit.
Bullshit.
Nothing to do with toasters.
Separate matter entirely.
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Bullshit.
Separate matter entirely to that mindless bullshit about writing the PIN number on their credit card. Nothing like that in fact.
Separate matter entirely to that mindless bullshit about writing the PIN number on their credit card. Nothing like that in fact.
Reply to
Rod Speed
Well bugger you with your 'bullshit' to everything.
See you later when I have another question
Reply to
Colin ®
Yes they would
Reply to
John
I'd drop that email addy. Could result in QRM
Reply to
Colin ®
Colin ® wrote
Even a refugee from the biggest sheltered workshop in the country should be able to bullshit its way out of its predicament better than that pathetic effort.
Reply to
Rod Speed
average home wireless network? playing the odds I think you would be safe.
if you are able to stop the wireless card sending its MAC address, then only by radio triangulation would they be able to work out where you are. Who would have that equipment on hand?
anyway, it would cost the network owner far more in legal fees than what would be gained by pursuing it legally. Until this area is formally regulated, you will be fine.
Reply to
pony

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