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Re: Monkey Brains
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I have an 8km 5 GHz WiFi link that is clear sight except for a tree at
about 300m from my side, and in summer the link is 10-12dB weaker than
in winter.  At legal power limit (1W EIRP) this makes the link fail in
summer, especially on wet days.
(rain itself does not result in much attenuation but a wet tree does)

OTOH, we have clear-sight link of 30-40km that work absolutely fine.
There is even a link from straight "behind me" but 20km further away
to the same endpoint that works much better than mine.  Those same trees
are in the path but as they are not so close to the endpoint they have
less effect.  (the line of sight is goes over them)

Re: Monkey Brains
On 23/08/18 02:07, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
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In many places such a draconian rule would rule out a link.

Re: Monkey Brains
On Monday, August 20, 2018 at 1:34:08 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
...They put a dish on the roof, ...

You might want to have their installers come back and...
1) Ground that antenna mast
2) Swap out all those black plastic tie-wraps for something that will last longer than a year or two.

Re: Monkey Brains
wrote:

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Damn, I missed that.

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I had an antenna install fall apart because I used the wrong ty wraps
from the local hardware store.  So, I switched to genuine UV
resistant.  No problems so far after about 5 years:
<https://www.hellermanntyton.us/bundling-securing/cable-ties/standard-cable-ties-special-materials/#it=item&material=Polyamide%206.6%20UV-resistant%20 (PA66UV)>
<https://www.hellermanntyton.us/resources/materials
<https://www.solarpowerworldonline.com/2016/03/not-all-uv-rated-cable-ties-have-long-lifespans-on-solar-projects/

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Monkey Brains
wrote:

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We don't get lightning here.

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Doesn't look like a big hazard.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: Monkey Brains
On Monday, August 20, 2018 at 9:26:17 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
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The uniform building code
requires it and it's the owner's responsibility.    
Representatives from your insurance company will see you in court,
and snicker, after the fire.

Re: Monkey Brains
wrote:

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Not here.

    
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Don't be silly.



--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: Monkey Brains
On 8/21/2018 7:06 PM, whit3rd wrote:
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Requires lighting?

Re: Monkey Brains
On 8/21/2018 9:24 PM, John S wrote:
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Re: Monkey Brains
On 21/08/2018 2:26 PM, John Larkin wrote:
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What, never?

Sylvia.



Re: Monkey Brains
wrote:

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We don't get lightning here.

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If they fail, we can replace them. It's easy to get on the roof.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/z55q4t460ui0n70/P7120054.JPG?raw=1

That's our EMI hardness tester in the fog.




--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing   precision measurement  

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Re: Monkey Brains
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Translation :

Murphy, oh Murphy, we have a non believer in Frisco.  

Re: Monkey Brains
On Tue, 21 Aug 2018 16:03:02 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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But we don't get lightning. The power lines do not have a high
grounding wire like they have in most places.

We rarely see a little lightning far off in the clouds (like, maybe
every few years) but no ground strikes.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: Monkey Brains
On Wednesday, August 22, 2018 at 12:21:26 PM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
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Nor earthquakes.


Recently.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Monkey Brains
On 08/21/2018 10:21 PM, John Larkin wrote:
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Back in about 1985 I lived in San Mateo for a semester, and one night we  
had the most amazing sequence of thunderstorms I have ever seen.  (I've  
been in NY for over 30 years now, and we get some doozies, but never  
anything like that one.)  Mo and I stayed up most of the night watching  
it from our 6th floor balcony.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: Monkey Brains
On Tue, 21 Aug 2018 13:01:44 -0700, John Larkin

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<http://en.blitzortung.org/live_lightning_maps.php?map30%

The mast and cable grounds are not intended to protect your building
from a direct hit.  If that happens, the lightning will follow the
network cable and eventually hit ground, leaving a path of destruction
along its path to ground.  What the ground does is offer a path to
earth ground for current induced in the mast or cables by a nearby
lightning hit.  Such hits usually don't start a fire, but do tend to
destroy equipment and zap people leaning against the tower or cables.
The NEC doesn't care if you have a 100ft tower, or a 3ft tower.  It
needs to be grounded, as are all satellite dish antennas, CATV cables,
and telephone MPOE boxes.  Ask any electrician.

Probably more than you want to read, but the drawings should offer a
clue as to what is involved:
"Antenna System Bonding and Grounding Requirements in the USA"
<http://www.reeve.com/Documents/Articles%20Papers/Reeve_AntennaSystemGroundingRequirements.pdf

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I keep running into installations where the roofing company voids
their roofing warranty if the owner or his contractors even walk on
the roof.  My office is in such a building.

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How do you turn it off?



--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Monkey Brains
wrote:

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The roofers included a footpath to make it easier to climb to the
peak.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/e72dzhe6xdjup7f/Footpath.jpg?raw=1

We also have a nice flat area where we'll have furniture and plants
and a BBQ.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/6qlt7k9xbv2uywy/Patio.jpg?raw=1



--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: Monkey Brains
On Tue, 21 Aug 2018 20:16:55 -0700, John Larkin

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Nice, but no hand rails?  However, I would guess(tm) that it was
installed to protect the roof, not to make it easier climb.  When I
was working on radio stuff on various roofs, there were usually rubber
mats installed between the roof entry hatch and the HVAC equipment or
antenna farm to protect the roof.  Most of what I found had crumbled
and in need of replacement.  I asked why they didn't build a wood or
steel walkway and was told that the semi-sharp edges tend to dig into
the roofing material can cut holes and slits.
<https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=roof+access+walkway
<https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=portable+roof+walkway
I just gave myself a quick rooftop view of the various Santa Cruz
industrial parks with Google Maps.  Such walkways are not very common
in my area.  I only found one.

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Is the roof EPDM rubber, TPO vinyl or modified bitumen torch down?
Methinks you should double check with your roofing contractor before
partying on the roof.  I'm not a roofing expert and therefore hesitate
to give advice, but what I've heard suggests that adding a ton or more
of human weight on most roofs is a bad idea.  The roofs I've that have
a party area, have a deck (wood or plastic) built over the actual
roof.  For smaller areas a "widows walk" platform.  Both types have
perimeter hand rails which your roof lacks.

This looks like a good roofing tutorial without the usual sales pitch:
"Top 3 Flat Roof Systems Explained"
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dtAeN7seW8


So, where are you going to put the solar panels?

  
--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Monkey Brains
mandag den 20. august 2018 kl. 19.34.08 UTC+2 skrev John Larkin:
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the airwaves are a finite and shared resource, you can always lay more  
wires or fibers



Re: Monkey Brains
On Mon, 20 Aug 2018 15:26:40 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen

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Limited-distance multi-GHz cells allow one fast link, fiber or
microwave or whatever, to cover a lot of wireless devices in a modest
area, like one city block maybe. That saves a heap of wire and fiber.

We only need one network to do everything: TV, internet, security,
phones, iot, talk to cars, control street lights and traffic lights,
read meters... everything. This current tangle of wires and fibers and
transmitters and cell towers and meter readers is barbaric.




--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


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