Block graphics displayed wrongly as characters....

When I first started with the Raspberry Pi the output from the cgps -s
command was displayed with block graphics:
formatting link

but now I get character instead (e.g "q" instead of the horizontal
lines, and "x" instead of the vertical lines etc.). I've obviously done
/something/
which has upset the mapping of (I guess) higher-order ASCII
characters, but I don't know exactly /what/ I've done.
How can I revert the SSH/PuTTY session to line graphics, and what might
I then lose? I.e. what might have needed the extended ASCII characters?
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Thanks, 
David 
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Reply to
David Taylor
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Have you changed your LANG (or LC_ALL or ...) setting from something like en_ZZ.utf8 to just en_ZZ (for some suitable ZZ)?
That is one thing which can have that effect.
What does echo /$LANG/ /$LC_ALL/ output?
Jim
Reply to
Jim Diamond
what is cgps ?
try the command
reset
You lose nothing if putty is running in UTF-8 mode
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For a good time: install ntp
Reply to
Jasen Betts
[]
Jim,
I've made no changes in language settings, as far as I know, but I am using a kernel I compiled myself and thinking back, that /may/ have been when the problems started. The output shows:
pi@raspberrypi ~ $ echo /$LANG/ /$LC_ALL/ /en_GB.UTF-8/ //
so it seems I have UTF8.
--
Cheers, 
David 
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Reply to
David Taylor
[]
Jasen, the "cgps -s" displays incorrectly right from the start, immediately after logging in. I did try reset but it made no difference.
The other thing I notice is that ls displays are in different colours for different file types. I recall from the dim and distant past that this would be set by ANSI escape sequences. I'm not sure I always had colours displayed, though, so perhaps that's another clue. I'm relative new to Linux.
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Cheers, 
David 
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Reply to
David Taylor
With thanks to Jasen and Jim, I have just discovered that setting the terminal in PuTTY to Window, Translation, Character set to ISO Latin-1 West Europe, seems to have done the trick. Why I needed to change it, though, I am no wiser.
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Cheers, 
David 
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Reply to
David Taylor
You shouldn't need to do that. Rather than changing the character set, look under the "Remote character set" drop-down and find the area labeled "Adjust how PuTTY handles line drawing characters". Select "Use Unicode line drawing code points".
Also, under "Colours", turn off 256-color mode.
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Blah blah bleh... 
GCS/CM d(-)@>-- s+:- !a C++$ UBL++++$ L+$ W+++$ w M++ Y++ b++
Reply to
Salvatore
Thanks, Salvatore. I made the changes in PuTTY which I understood you suggested:
- Windows, Translation, Line drawing: Use Unicode line-drawing points (was already checked)
- Windows, Translation, Remote character set: UTF-8
- Windows, Colours, 256-colour mode, unchecked
But that has resulted in characters, rather than line drawing, being displayed.
--
Cheers, 
David 
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Reply to
David Taylor

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