U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool

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The U. of Chicago has taken my infection rate metric (confirmed cases per m
illion population) to the next level: interactive county-by-county visualiz
ation. This shows hot spots that state level data miss. Hot spots are count
ies with high infection rate that are surrounded by counties with elevated  
infection rates (this filters outliers, isolated counties with a high infec
tion rate). The U. of Chicago is using the same data source that I am using
 (1point3acres.com).

https://news.uchicago.edu/story/state-level-data-misses-growing-coronavirus
-hot-spots-us-including-south

The tool allows you to drill down to county level data that includes:
1. Confirmed case count.
2. COVID-19 deaths.
3. Licensed hospital beds
4. Daily new data (cases, deaths, infection rate, death rate)

https://geodacenter.github.io/covid/map.html

The country-wide view can select from 10 different metrics:
1. Confirmed count
2. Confirmed count per 10k population
3. Confirmed count per licensed bed (this is well above 1 for the NYC area)
4. Death count
5. Death count per 10k population
6. Death count per Confirmed count
7-10. Daily metrics

All of this data is available by date since the start of the crisis. You ca
n also compare state-only data to country data to see the dramatic differen
ce between the two.

Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On 2020-04-06 14:07, Flyguy wrote:
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The confirmed infection rate in my county is running 1.5% of the total
population as of today.  The true rate will of course be much higher.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Monday, April 6, 2020 at 4:20:45 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
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irus-hot-spots-us-including-south
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I believe that is the second highest in the country.  First place is Blaine
 county Idaho with a population of 22,000 and 16 infections per hospital be
d.  Their death ratio seems to also be in line with your area.  I wonder wh
y they got hit hard.  With such a high infection to bed ratio I wonder if t
hey are coping?  It can't be good, but maybe the can ship patients to hospi
tals in other areas.  

--  

  Rick C.

  - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
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Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Monday, April 6, 2020 at 1:20:45 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
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The actual infection rate could be as much as 20 times the confirmed rate; Dr. Fauci seems to think it is just 2-4 times.

Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 12:12:39 PM UTC+10, Flyguy wrote:
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Everything is possible, but that's very unlikely to be true.

We will know more when we start testing lots of people for antibodies to Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively small scale.

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And that's high too, but at least he's an expert - but one stuck with the job of not showing up Donald Trump.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 1:00:41 AM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:

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Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively small scale
.
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 job of not showing up Donald Trump.

Okay, so you're still pretending to be the expert epidemiologist. Your igno
rance and oversimplifications are nothing short of astounding.

The antibody rapid tests are looking for the SARS IgM and IgG antibodies. T
he IgM disappear below detectibility within weeks and the IgG have been obs
erved to be detectable after 3-4 months, but the research is unsure how muc
h longer that persistence will last.
The Chinese developed a lab grade test back in 2004 for the original SARS a
nd found both of these spike protein antibodies to be detectable for over 6
00 days. But there's no telling if that kind of test is feasible from the p
erspective of mass production and cost. The rapid test manufacturers of tod
ay certainly can't and don't claim anything near that performance.
Another surprising result was the Chinese lab grade test required the victi
m to be 20-40 days into the infection before the level of antibody detectab
ility reached even 80%. This can be considered an upper limit on the rapid  
test technology we have presently I'm guessing. The rapid tests are not tot
ally useless, they sell for about $25 per test.
  
So, to put things simply in a way you can understand. Jack and Jill ran up  
the hill. Jack says to Jill, the antibody tests are not going give us the h
istorical information we need. To which Jill responds: "meh."


Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 11:54:02 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wro
te:
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o Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively small sca
le.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
he job of not showing up Donald Trump.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
norance and oversimplifications are nothing short of astounding.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 The IgM disappear below detectibility within weeks and the IgG have been o
bserved to be detectable after 3-4 months, but the research is unsure how m
uch longer that persistence will last.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 and found both of these spike protein antibodies to be detectable for over
 600 days. But there's no telling if that kind of test is feasible from the
 perspective of mass production and cost. The rapid test manufacturers of t
oday certainly can't and don't claim anything near that performance.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
tim to be 20-40 days into the infection before the level of antibody detect
ability reached even 80%. This can be considered an upper limit on the rapi
d test technology we have presently I'm guessing. The rapid tests are not t
otally useless, they sell for about $25 per test.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
p the hill. Jack says to Jill, the antibody tests are not going give us the
 historical information we need. To which Jill responds: "meh."

The more I think about it, the more I believe I had a "mild" case of COVID-
19 at the end of February.  I'm more interested in knowing what the actual  
infection rate was at the time.  

--  

  Rick C.

  + Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 3:42:47 PM UTC-4, Ricky C wrote:
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rote:
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 to Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively small s
cale.
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 the job of not showing up Donald Trump.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ignorance and oversimplifications are nothing short of astounding.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
s. The IgM disappear below detectibility within weeks and the IgG have been
 observed to be detectable after 3-4 months, but the research is unsure how
 much longer that persistence will last.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
RS and found both of these spike protein antibodies to be detectable for ov
er 600 days. But there's no telling if that kind of test is feasible from t
he perspective of mass production and cost. The rapid test manufacturers of
 today certainly can't and don't claim anything near that performance.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ictim to be 20-40 days into the infection before the level of antibody dete
ctability reached even 80%. This can be considered an upper limit on the ra
pid test technology we have presently I'm guessing. The rapid tests are not
 totally useless, they sell for about $25 per test.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 up the hill. Jack says to Jill, the antibody tests are not going give us t
he historical information we need. To which Jill responds: "meh."
Quoted text here. Click to load it
D-19 at the end of February.  I'm more interested in knowing what the actua
l infection rate was at the time.  

I'm hearing more people relating the same experience. Some went to their do
ctor and were diagnosed with "some kind of weird flu." It's not a coinciden
ce that this "weird" flu shows up 4-6 months into the flu season coincident
 with the China situation getting out of hand. What happens in China doesn'
t stay in China, with those !@#$%^&* airlines flying tens of thousands of t
hose people in and out of the country every day. They were bringing it here
 since at least November, maybe sooner.


Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 5:55:40 AM UTC+10, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com w
rote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
es to Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively small
 scale.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
th the job of not showing up Donald Trump.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
r ignorance and oversimplifications are nothing short of astounding.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ies. The IgM disappear below detectibility within weeks and the IgG have be
en observed to be detectable after 3-4 months, but the research is unsure h
ow much longer that persistence will last.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
SARS and found both of these spike protein antibodies to be detectable for  
over 600 days. But there's no telling if that kind of test is feasible from
 the perspective of mass production and cost. The rapid test manufacturers  
of today certainly can't and don't claim anything near that performance.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 victim to be 20-40 days into the infection before the level of antibody de
tectability reached even 80%. This can be considered an upper limit on the  
rapid test technology we have presently I'm guessing. The rapid tests are n
ot totally useless, they sell for about $25 per test.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
an up the hill. Jack says to Jill, the antibody tests are not going give us
 the historical information we need. To which Jill responds: "meh."
Quoted text here. Click to load it
VID-19 at the end of February.  I'm more interested in knowing what the act
ual infection rate was at the time.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
doctor and were diagnosed with "some kind of weird flu." It's not a coincid
ence that this "weird" flu shows up 4-6 months into the flu season coincide
nt with the China situation getting out of hand. What happens in China does
n't stay in China, with those !@#$%^&* airlines flying tens of thousands of
 those people in and out of the country every day. They were bringing it he
re since at least November, maybe sooner.

Lots of people think they might have had some fashionable disease.

Medical students are particularly prone to this, so being rather better inf
ormed about medicine than the people who are posting here isn't any kind of
 defense against it.

The fact that we've now got a problem with Covid-19 doesn't mean that you c
an't have had some form of weird flu - that was just flu - going around as  
well.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 12:10:22 AM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
om wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
dies to Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively sma
ll scale.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
with the job of not showing up Donald Trump.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
our ignorance and oversimplifications are nothing short of astounding.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
odies. The IgM disappear below detectibility within weeks and the IgG have  
been observed to be detectable after 3-4 months, but the research is unsure
 how much longer that persistence will last.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
l SARS and found both of these spike protein antibodies to be detectable fo
r over 600 days. But there's no telling if that kind of test is feasible fr
om the perspective of mass production and cost. The rapid test manufacturer
s of today certainly can't and don't claim anything near that performance.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
he victim to be 20-40 days into the infection before the level of antibody  
detectability reached even 80%. This can be considered an upper limit on th
e rapid test technology we have presently I'm guessing. The rapid tests are
 not totally useless, they sell for about $25 per test.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 ran up the hill. Jack says to Jill, the antibody tests are not going give  
us the historical information we need. To which Jill responds: "meh."
Quoted text here. Click to load it
COVID-19 at the end of February.  I'm more interested in knowing what the a
ctual infection rate was at the time.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
r doctor and were diagnosed with "some kind of weird flu." It's not a coinc
idence that this "weird" flu shows up 4-6 months into the flu season coinci
dent with the China situation getting out of hand. What happens in China do
esn't stay in China, with those !@#$%^&* airlines flying tens of thousands  
of those people in and out of the country every day. They were bringing it  
here since at least November, maybe sooner.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
nformed about medicine than the people who are posting here isn't any kind  
of defense against it.
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 can't have had some form of weird flu - that was just flu - going around a
s well.
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Here's a symptoms chart to help distinguish between various illnesses:
https://www.wcia.com/health/spotting-the-difference-between-covid-19-and-al
lergies/

Anyone with any experience with influenza knows it is not "the" flu.

Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 5:46:00 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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They didn't list chills.  My understanding is pronounced chills are a common symptom.  

--  

  Rick C.

  -- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
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Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 6:38:20 PM UTC-4, Ricky C wrote:
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wrote:
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d-allergies/
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mon symptom.  
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News breaking today is the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency had been tracki
ng the corona outbreak in Chine since November. The people I'm talking abou
t, who came down with the "some kind of weird flu," all caught this thing i
n the early December time frame, long before corona was a word on the news.
 So this stuff about it being a suggestion driven by some kind of hypochond
ria is bull. That dammed virus was here and circulating in the U.S. in Nove
mber time frame, and the government will deny it because it's a major failu
re of public health surveillance.

Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 1:54:02 AM UTC+10, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com w
rote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
o Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively small sca
le.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
he job of not showing up Donald Trump.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
norance and oversimplifications are nothing short of astounding.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 The IgM disappear below detectibility within weeks and the IgG have been o
bserved to be detectable after 3-4 months, but the research is unsure how m
uch longer that persistence will last.

Since patient zero got sick in the 1st December 2019, juat over four months
 ago, that's tautologous observation.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
 and found both of these spike protein antibodies to be detectable for over
 600 days. But there's no telling if that kind of test is feasible from the
 perspective of mass production and cost. The rapid test manufacturers of t
oday certainly can't and don't claim anything near that performance.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
tim to be 20-40 days into the infection before the level of antibody detect
ability reached even 80%. This can be considered an upper limit on the rapi
d test technology we have presently I'm guessing. The rapid tests are not t
otally useless, they sell for about $25 per test.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
p the hill. Jack says to Jill, the antibody tests are not going give us the
 historical information we need. To which Jill responds: "meh."

Your guesswork is compromised by your demonstrated capacity to get confused
 about what you think you remember.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 12:04:00 AM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 to Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively small s
cale.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 the job of not showing up Donald Trump.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ignorance and oversimplifications are nothing short of astounding.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
s. The IgM disappear below detectibility within weeks and the IgG have been
 observed to be detectable after 3-4 months, but the research is unsure how
 much longer that persistence will last.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
hs ago, that's tautologous observation.

That patient zero jazz is a genomic analysis study. There are now 8 distinc
t strains circulating, all of which are mutations of the so-called patient  
zero strain which they're thinking first appeared in November. All this des
criptive numbering is purely figurative, just like the infection rate being
 visualized as people infecting a fractional number of other people, which  
i abotu as real as the average this or average that.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
RS and found both of these spike protein antibodies to be detectable for ov
er 600 days. But there's no telling if that kind of test is feasible from t
he perspective of mass production and cost. The rapid test manufacturers of
 today certainly can't and don't claim anything near that performance.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ictim to be 20-40 days into the infection before the level of antibody dete
ctability reached even 80%. This can be considered an upper limit on the ra
pid test technology we have presently I'm guessing. The rapid tests are not
 totally useless, they sell for about $25 per test.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 up the hill. Jack says to Jill, the antibody tests are not going give us t
he historical information we need. To which Jill responds: "meh."
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ed about what you think you remember.

I rarely get "confused." My point was the rapid antibody test will be unusa
ble towards a large scale retrospective study of the spread of the epidemic
, but apparently that was lost on you.

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Thursday, April 9, 2020 at 7:52:53 AM UTC+10, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wr
ote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
om wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
es to Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively small
 scale.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
th the job of not showing up Donald Trump.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
r ignorance and oversimplifications are nothing short of astounding.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ies. The IgM disappear below detectibility within weeks and the IgG have be
en observed to be detectable after 3-4 months, but the research is unsure h
ow much longer that persistence will last.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
nths ago, that's tautologous observation.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
nct strains circulating, all of which are mutations of the so-called patien
t zero strain which they're thinking first appeared in November. All this d
escriptive numbering is purely figurative, just like the infection rate bei
ng visualized as people infecting a fractional number of other people, whic
h i abotu as real as the average this or average that.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
SARS and found both of these spike protein antibodies to be detectable for  
over 600 days. But there's no telling if that kind of test is feasible from
 the perspective of mass production and cost. The rapid test manufacturers  
of today certainly can't and don't claim anything near that performance.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 victim to be 20-40 days into the infection before the level of antibody de
tectability reached even 80%. This can be considered an upper limit on the  
rapid test technology we have presently I'm guessing. The rapid tests are n
ot totally useless, they sell for about $25 per test.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
an up the hill. Jack says to Jill, the antibody tests are not going give us
 the historical information we need. To which Jill responds: "meh."
Quoted text here. Click to load it
used about what you think you remember.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

You rarely notice when it is demonstrated that you did get confused. This i
sn't quite same thing.  

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le retrospective study of the spread of the epidemic, but apparently that w
as lost on you.

Still is. The conclusion seemed to be based on the idea that antibodies go  
away with time, when the real problem is that RNA viruses mutate fast enoug
h the antibody to the ancestral virus doesn't react to it's remote descenda
nt,

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Thursday, April 9, 2020 at 1:10:05 AM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
.com wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
dies to Covid-19. This is starting to happen, but it's still relatively sma
ll scale.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
with the job of not showing up Donald Trump.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
our ignorance and oversimplifications are nothing short of astounding.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
odies. The IgM disappear below detectibility within weeks and the IgG have  
been observed to be detectable after 3-4 months, but the research is unsure
 how much longer that persistence will last.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
months ago, that's tautologous observation.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
tinct strains circulating, all of which are mutations of the so-called pati
ent zero strain which they're thinking first appeared in November. All this
 descriptive numbering is purely figurative, just like the infection rate b
eing visualized as people infecting a fractional number of other people, wh
ich i abotu as real as the average this or average that.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
l SARS and found both of these spike protein antibodies to be detectable fo
r over 600 days. But there's no telling if that kind of test is feasible fr
om the perspective of mass production and cost. The rapid test manufacturer
s of today certainly can't and don't claim anything near that performance.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
he victim to be 20-40 days into the infection before the level of antibody  
detectability reached even 80%. This can be considered an upper limit on th
e rapid test technology we have presently I'm guessing. The rapid tests are
 not totally useless, they sell for about $25 per test.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 ran up the hill. Jack says to Jill, the antibody tests are not going give  
us the historical information we need. To which Jill responds: "meh."
Quoted text here. Click to load it
nfused about what you think you remember.
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 isn't quite same thing.  

You keep making outrageous claims like this when in fact you're hopelessly  
confused to think you came anywhere close to "demonstrating" anything. You'
re too old now to evolve to the point where you could eventually realize ho
w addle brained you sound. Your situation is hopeless.

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cale retrospective study of the spread of the epidemic, but apparently that
 was lost on you.
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o away with time, when the real problem is that RNA viruses mutate fast eno
ugh the antibody to the ancestral virus doesn't react to it's remote descen
dant,

There have been no such mutations noted, and the various mutations and/or s
trains that have been identified, using a much larger population than just  
a single individual, all have the same immutable S-(spike) protein used for
 cell fusion/infection. All the rapid antibody tests are looking for the Ig
X's targeting that S-protein.  

You still seem confused about the two distinct types of antibody tests: 1)  
the one type looking for antibodies in the blood that react to a specific a
ntigen, and 2) the type looking for antigens in the blood that react to a s
pecific antibody. Nothing by way of the second test are even in the process
 of being introduced, mainly because they're a lot more trouble with raisin
g transgenic animal stock, infecting them and extracting and tagging antibo
dies. Even you should be able to understand how much more work that is.

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Friday, April 10, 2020 at 12:57:05 AM UTC+10, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wr
ote:
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m wrote:
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il.com wrote:
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<snip>

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 scale retrospective study of the spread of the epidemic, but apparently th
at was lost on you.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 go away with time, when the real problem is that RNA viruses mutate fast e
nough the antibody to the ancestral virus doesn't react to it's remote desc
endant,
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 strains that have been identified, using a much larger population than jus
t a single individual, all have the same immutable S-(spike) protein used f
or cell fusion/infection. All the rapid antibody tests are looking for the  
IgX's targeting that S-protein.  

All the rapid antibody tests may be looking for the spike protein, but natu
ral antibodies aren't that specific, otherwise the 25% of colds caused by c
orona viruses would be blocked by our own antibodies, and SARs, MERS and Co
vid-19 wouldn't have infected us.

Some weeks ago a I posted a link to some work on a synthetic vaccine which  
was supposed to create lots of synthetic spike protein in the blood of the  
people being vaccinated, so that they'd antibodies that reacted just to the
 spike protein on the surface of any of the corona viruses - SARS, MERs, Ci
vd-19 and the one that cause 25% of common colds - natural antibodies seem  
to go for larger targets, and the viruses do mutate enough to change the sp
acing between the spike proteins, so that natural antibodies don't pick up  
on different corona viruses.  
  
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) the one type looking for antibodies in the blood that react to a specific
 antigen, and 2) the type looking for antigens in the blood that react to a
 specific antibody.  

I can't imagine why you think that. I worked on a machine that used monoclo
nal antibodies to latch onto specific infective agents - the one that got s
old to Porton Down got sold with a bunch of disposable sensing blocks that  
had been loaded with an antibody that latched onto  Yersinia pestis (the Bl
ack Plague bacterium).

The natural antibodies in the blood latch onto specific bacteria and viruse
s, and there are well know tests to checked whether you've been infected -  
that's how the Dutch doctors worked out that my wife's weird symptoms were  
caused by secondary European Lyme disease (borrelia). My Dutch GP checked m
e out years later, and I had antibodies to borrelia too, but my immune syst
em seemed to have got rid of the bugs at the primary stage of the infection
.

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uced, mainly because they're a lot more trouble with raising transgenic ani
mal stock, infecting them and extracting and tagging antibodies. Even you s
hould be able to understand how much more work that is.

Your "second test" looking for antigens in the blood (or saliva or nasal mu
cus) is an example of what is used to check for the Covid-19 virus.

Monoclonal antibodies are great at locking onto specific antigens - as used
 in the machine I worked on.

The confusion is clearly all yours.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Thursday, April 9, 2020 at 11:32:25 AM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
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wrote:
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com wrote:
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:
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mail.com wrote:
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e:
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ge scale retrospective study of the spread of the epidemic, but apparently  
that was lost on you.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
es go away with time, when the real problem is that RNA viruses mutate fast
 enough the antibody to the ancestral virus doesn't react to it's remote de
scendant,
Quoted text here. Click to load it
or strains that have been identified, using a much larger population than j
ust a single individual, all have the same immutable S-(spike) protein used
 for cell fusion/infection. All the rapid antibody tests are looking for th
e IgX's targeting that S-protein.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
tural antibodies aren't that specific, otherwise the 25% of colds caused by
 corona viruses would be blocked by our own antibodies, and SARs, MERS and  
Covid-19 wouldn't have infected us.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
h was supposed to create lots of synthetic spike protein in the blood of th
e people being vaccinated, so that they'd antibodies that reacted just to t
he spike protein on the surface of any of the corona viruses - SARS, MERs,  
Civd-19 and the one that cause 25% of common colds - natural antibodies see
m to go for larger targets, and the viruses do mutate enough to change the  
spacing between the spike proteins, so that natural antibodies don't pick u
p on different corona viruses.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 1) the one type looking for antibodies in the blood that react to a specif
ic antigen, and 2) the type looking for antigens in the blood that react to
 a specific antibody.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
lonal antibodies to latch onto specific infective agents - the one that got
 sold to Porton Down got sold with a bunch of disposable sensing blocks tha
t had been loaded with an antibody that latched onto  Yersinia pestis (the  
Black Plague bacterium).

All that may be fine and dandy, but you obviously didn't have to know squat
 about immunobiology to do whatever engineering you were doing. So your cla
im to having any kind of credentials is vacuous.


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ses, and there are well know tests to checked whether you've been infected  
- that's how the Dutch doctors worked out that my wife's weird symptoms wer
e caused by secondary European Lyme disease (borrelia). My Dutch GP checked
 me out years later, and I had antibodies to borrelia too, but my immune sy
stem seemed to have got rid of the bugs at the primary stage of the infecti
on.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
oduced, mainly because they're a lot more trouble with raising transgenic a
nimal stock, infecting them and extracting and tagging antibodies. Even you
 should be able to understand how much more work that is.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
mucus) is an example of what is used to check for the Covid-19 virus.

Wow- you're so out to lunch you won't be back until Christmas! That's the P
CR looking for gene sequence (s) in the antigen. Nobody calls that an antib
ody test, they're called RT-PCR surprisingly enough. And they have develope
d rapid PCR, see my post about Abbott Labs recent introduction, the 5-minut
e test, that's going to make them richer than rich.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
ed in the machine I worked on.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Monoclonal antibodies just don't drop out of the sky, especially in your da
y> They were designed from antibodies isolated from people and or animals w
ho survived the disease. Even in this day and with their incredible simulat
ion capability, the monoclonal antibody manufacturers are using survivor an
itbodies. I know you're so damned dumb you think they're using the survivor
's actual antibody, but it really means they're using the antibody the surv
ivor's immune designed designed, and then going to transgenic mic or some o
ther means to actually mass produce the antibody.

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Friday, April 10, 2020 at 3:29:09 AM UTC+10, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wro
te:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
m wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
l.com wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
te:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
@gmail.com wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
arge scale retrospective study of the spread of the epidemic, but apparentl
y that was lost on you.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
dies go away with time, when the real problem is that RNA viruses mutate fa
st enough the antibody to the ancestral virus doesn't react to it's remote  
descendant,
Quoted text here. Click to load it
d/or strains that have been identified, using a much larger population than
 just a single individual, all have the same immutable S-(spike) protein us
ed for cell fusion/infection. All the rapid antibody tests are looking for  
the IgX's targeting that S-protein.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
natural antibodies aren't that specific, otherwise the 25% of colds caused  
by corona viruses would be blocked by our own antibodies, and SARs, MERS an
d Covid-19 wouldn't have infected us.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ich was supposed to create lots of synthetic spike protein in the blood of  
the people being vaccinated, so that they'd antibodies that reacted just to
 the spike protein on the surface of any of the corona viruses - SARS, MERs
, Civd-19 and the one that cause 25% of common colds - natural antibodies s
eem to go for larger targets, and the viruses do mutate enough to change th
e spacing between the spike proteins, so that natural antibodies don't pick
 up on different corona viruses.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
s: 1) the one type looking for antibodies in the blood that react to a spec
ific antigen, and 2) the type looking for antigens in the blood that react  
to a specific antibody.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
oclonal antibodies to latch onto specific infective agents - the one that g
ot sold to Porton Down got sold with a bunch of disposable sensing blocks t
hat had been loaded with an antibody that latched onto  Yersinia pestis (th
e Black Plague bacterium).
Quoted text here. Click to load it
at about immunobiology to do whatever engineering you were doing. So your c
laim to having any kind of credentials is vacuous.

I don't have any credentials for immunology - any more than I do for electr
onics - and I definitely wasn't doing any of the immunolgy on the machine.  
I knew enough immunology at the time to have a perfectly adequate understan
ding of what was going on. When I was a graduate student I lived in a place
 that also accommodated lots of visitors to the Walter and Eliza Hall Insti
tute in Melbourne, so immunology did come up in conversation, and I've been
 interested in it ever since.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
ruses, and there are well known tests to checked whether you've been infect
ed - that's how the Dutch doctors worked out that my wife's weird symptoms  
were caused by secondary European Lyme disease (borrelia). My Dutch GP chec
ked me out years later, and I had antibodies to borrelia too, but my immune
 system seemed to have got rid of the bugs at the primary stage of the infe
ction.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
troduced, mainly because they're a lot more trouble with raising transgenic
 animal stock, infecting them and extracting and tagging antibodies. Even y
ou should be able to understand how much more work that is.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
l mucus) is an example of what is used to check for the Covid-19 virus.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 PCR looking for gene sequence (s) in the antigen. Nobody calls that an ant
ibody test, they're called RT-PCR surprisingly enough. And they have develo
ped rapid PCR, see my post about Abbott Labs recent introduction, the 5-min
ute test, that's going to make them richer than rich.

That certainly one way of doing it, but there's also a rapid two way test a
vailable that test both for the virus and antibodies to it, which has been  
mentioned here.

That clearly didn't involved sequencing the genome of the virus.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
used in the machine I worked on.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
day. They were designed from antibodies isolated from people and or animals
 who survived the disease. Even in this day and with their incredible simul
ation capability, the monoclonal antibody manufacturers are using survivor  
anitbodies. I know you're so damned dumb you think they're using the surviv
or's actual antibody, but it really means they're using the antibody the su
rvivor's immune designed designed, and then going to transgenic mic or some
 other means to actually mass produce the antibody.

What do you think "monoclonal" refers to? Somebody cloned a particular cell
 that was churning out the desired antibody, and replicated it on an indust
rial scale to churn out a lot of that particular antibody.

As soon as you have got a lot of single molecule you can start working out  
it's atomic structure, how it folds and all the other difficult stuff that  
determines how it latches on to it's antigen. I was trained as a physical c
hemists, but the structural chemists spent as much time on the university c
omputer as I did.

Back then Max Perutz had just the Nobel Prize for working out the molecular
 structure of haemoglobin. One of my friends from the period did a post-doc
 at his laboratory for molecular biology in Cambridge, and I picked her up  
from there once or twice. The science has moved on quite a bit since then (
and so has the friend - the friendship wasn't that close and didn't last).

"biochemist is Head of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
 at the University of Melbourne where she earned her Ph.D. in Biochemistry  
in 1974. Subsequently she went to Cambridge to do post-doctoral work."

I've not got any credentials at all in immunology, but I do know quite a bi
t about it. You may have mastered more snippets, but you don't seem to unde
rstand all that much.
  
--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Re: U. of Chicago COVID-19 interactive data visualization tool
On Friday, April 10, 2020 at 1:09:53 AM UTC-4, Bill Sloman wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
rote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
com wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ail.com wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
rote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
..@gmail.com wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 large scale retrospective study of the spread of the epidemic, but apparen
tly that was lost on you.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
bodies go away with time, when the real problem is that RNA viruses mutate  
fast enough the antibody to the ancestral virus doesn't react to it's remot
e descendant,
Quoted text here. Click to load it
and/or strains that have been identified, using a much larger population th
an just a single individual, all have the same immutable S-(spike) protein  
used for cell fusion/infection. All the rapid antibody tests are looking fo
r the IgX's targeting that S-protein.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
t natural antibodies aren't that specific, otherwise the 25% of colds cause
d by corona viruses would be blocked by our own antibodies, and SARs, MERS  
and Covid-19 wouldn't have infected us.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
which was supposed to create lots of synthetic spike protein in the blood o
f the people being vaccinated, so that they'd antibodies that reacted just  
to the spike protein on the surface of any of the corona viruses - SARS, ME
Rs, Civd-19 and the one that cause 25% of common colds - natural antibodies
 seem to go for larger targets, and the viruses do mutate enough to change  
the spacing between the spike proteins, so that natural antibodies don't pi
ck up on different corona viruses.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
sts: 1) the one type looking for antibodies in the blood that react to a sp
ecific antigen, and 2) the type looking for antigens in the blood that reac
t to a specific antibody.  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
onoclonal antibodies to latch onto specific infective agents - the one that
 got sold to Porton Down got sold with a bunch of disposable sensing blocks
 that had been loaded with an antibody that latched onto  Yersinia pestis (
the Black Plague bacterium).
Quoted text here. Click to load it
quat about immunobiology to do whatever engineering you were doing. So your
 claim to having any kind of credentials is vacuous.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
tronics - and I definitely wasn't doing any of the immunolgy on the machine
. I knew enough immunology at the time to have a perfectly adequate underst
anding of what was going on. When I was a graduate student I lived in a pla
ce that also accommodated lots of visitors to the Walter and Eliza Hall Ins
titute in Melbourne, so immunology did come up in conversation, and I've be
en interested in it ever since.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
viruses, and there are well known tests to checked whether you've been infe
cted - that's how the Dutch doctors worked out that my wife's weird symptom
s were caused by secondary European Lyme disease (borrelia). My Dutch GP ch
ecked me out years later, and I had antibodies to borrelia too, but my immu
ne system seemed to have got rid of the bugs at the primary stage of the in
fection.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
introduced, mainly because they're a lot more trouble with raising transgen
ic animal stock, infecting them and extracting and tagging antibodies. Even
 you should be able to understand how much more work that is.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
sal mucus) is an example of what is used to check for the Covid-19 virus.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
he PCR looking for gene sequence (s) in the antigen. Nobody calls that an a
ntibody test, they're called RT-PCR surprisingly enough. And they have deve
loped rapid PCR, see my post about Abbott Labs recent introduction, the 5-m
inute test, that's going to make them richer than rich.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 available that test both for the virus and antibodies to it, which has bee
n mentioned here.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
s used in the machine I worked on.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
r day. They were designed from antibodies isolated from people and or anima
ls who survived the disease. Even in this day and with their incredible sim
ulation capability, the monoclonal antibody manufacturers are using survivo
r anitbodies. I know you're so damned dumb you think they're using the surv
ivor's actual antibody, but it really means they're using the antibody the  
survivor's immune designed designed, and then going to transgenic mic or so
me other means to actually mass produce the antibody.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ll that was churning out the desired antibody, and replicated it on an indu
strial scale to churn out a lot of that particular antibody.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
t it's atomic structure, how it folds and all the other difficult stuff tha
t determines how it latches on to it's antigen. I was trained as a physical
 chemists, but the structural chemists spent as much time on the university
 computer as I did.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
ar structure of haemoglobin. One of my friends from the period did a post-d
oc at his laboratory for molecular biology in Cambridge, and I picked her u
p from there once or twice. The science has moved on quite a bit since then
 (and so has the friend - the friendship wasn't that close and didn't last)
.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
gy at the University of Melbourne where she earned her Ph.D. in Biochemistr
y in 1974. Subsequently she went to Cambridge to do post-doctoral work."
Quoted text here. Click to load it
bit about it. You may have mastered more snippets, but you don't seem to un
derstand all that much.

Whatever you think you know it has not helped you rise up out of a mire of  
irrationality with your wackadoodle explanations of things, every single on
e of which is wrong.

Quoted text here. Click to load it


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