OT: New York State has solved the problem of verifying teacher's qualifications...

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
OT: New York State has solved the problem of verifying teacher's
qualifications...

<http://tinyurl.com/hxekkv9

Natural selection ?>:-}
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--  
| James E.Thompson                                 |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations                               |     et      |
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT: New York State has solved the problem of verifying teacher's qualifications...
On Sun, 12 Mar 2017 14:33:50 -0700, Jim Thompson wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

They're gonna call it: 'The Sloman Initiative' :->

Re: OT: New York State has solved the problem of verifying teacher's qualifications...
On 03/12/2017 05:54 PM, Cursitor Doom wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

"The vocabularies of the majority of high-school pupils are amazingly  
small. I always try to use simple English, and yet I have talked to  
classes when quite a minority of the pupils did not comprehend more than  
half of what I said."

-M. W. Smith, "Methods of Study in English," 1889

Re: OT: New York State has solved the problem of verifying teacher's qualifications...
On Sun, 12 Mar 2017 19:28:00 -0400, bitrex wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

sounds like Orwells nuspeak dictionary.

Re: OT: New York State has solved the problem of verifying teacher's qualifications...
On Sun, 12 Mar 2017 19:28:00 -0400, bitrex

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Even smaller when the teachers are functionally illiterate.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: OT: New York State has solved the problem of verifying teacher's qualifications...
On Monday, March 13, 2017 at 8:33:58 AM UTC+11, Jim Thompson wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Everybody wants cheap pencil and paper tests for identifying good students  
and good teachers. Nobody wants to pay for the kind of tedious in-depth tes
ting whose results show a decent correlation with in-service performance.

Having an experienced teacher sit in on a numbers of classes being taught b
y a newly hired teacher would be lot more informative than a pencil and pap
er test, and the experienced teacher might even be able to help the new hir
e with advice, but it costs a lot more money.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Site Timeline