Can You Just Spplice CAT-5 Cable ?

I have a bunch of wire that has more than enough conductors to do it. But a re there any impedance requirements ? It doesn't appear so at first look, i t looks like phone wire (but stranded) with a couple of extra conductors in it. It would not be moved much so solid wire should be fine.

And frequency, would a splice cause standing waves or anything that would s crew up the communications ? After all, DSL goes through 100 year old phone wires right ?

I'd like to run this stuff through the walls etc.

Reply to
jurb6006
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Den onsdag den 4. april 2018 kl. 01.26.45 UTC+2 skrev snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com:

are there any impedance requirements ? It doesn't appear so at first look, it looks like phone wire (but stranded) with a couple of extra conductors in it. It would not be moved much so solid wire should be fine.

screw up the communications ? After all, DSL goes through 100 year old pho ne wires right ?

you can probably get away with splicing it, but you have to use cat-5/6 cab le, impedance is important

Reply to
Lasse Langwadt Christensen

Cat5 also has anti-crosstalk provisions, either individual pair shields or different twists. That wouldn't matter for a short run.

Real CAT5 cable is cheap, so best to not take chances. Short soldered splices should be OK.

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John Larkin   Highland Technology, Inc   trk 

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Reply to
John Larkin

But are there any impedance requirements ? It doesn't appear so at first lo ok, it looks like phone wire (but stranded) with a couple of extra conducto rs in it. It would not be moved much so solid wire should be fine.

uld screw up the communications ? After all, DSL goes through 100 year old phone wires right ?

cable, impedance is important

you don't need to lose those when soldering, the twist rate will just be le ss accurate.

patch & switchboxes that make no attempt to keep the twists are ok too afai k.

NT

Reply to
tabbypurr

m:

. But are there any impedance requirements ? It doesn't appear so at first look, it looks like phone wire (but stranded) with a couple of extra conduc tors in it. It would not be moved much so solid wire should be fine.

would screw up the communications ? After all, DSL goes through 100 year ol d phone wires right ?

6 cable, impedance is important

less accurate.

aik.

it is quite robust

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Reply to
Lasse Langwadt Christensen

For what? 10/100 runs on wet string (literally). 100BASE-T over a reasonable distance (10m+) will need reasonable media. Gigabit or more needs better still.

The biggest problem you will have is, if your junk wire is PVC, the high frequency losses will be s**te, making it rather unsuitable at long distances, maybe even for 100Mb.

The impedance of most cable is in the right ballpark at least, not too much problem there. HF loss is probably the worse problem, and crosstalk if it's not twisted-pairs type.

Keep in mind that most DSL runs in the 10Mb range, and has a much fancier signaling method than 100BASE-T! :-)

Tim

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Seven Transistor Labs, LLC 
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Reply to
Tim Williams

If you're doing 10/100/1000baseT, there are rather stringent impedance, crosstalk, and loss requirements. Allegedly, all these are rated at 100 meters maximum cable length. There's quite a large safety factor. In the not so distant past, I was involved in an informal contest to see who could abuse the ethernet wiring standards (EIA-568A/B) the most. Using unmodified transceivers, I was able to do about 900 ft with 10baseT, 600ft with 100baseT, and I didn't try it with 1000baseT. Acceptable performance was tested with a managed (SNMP) 10/100/1000baseT ethernet switch which produced zero errors. For comparision, using a 25 pair telco bundle at 10baseT resulted in about 30ft maximum before I started seeing errors. In case the lesson isn't obvious, don't bother using crap cable not designed to work with ethernet.

If all you had in the bundle was one ethernet circuit, it might work. However, if the bundle is full of T1, signalling, door bells, alarm circuits, DSL, or other signalling systems that generate noise, it's not going to work.

A splice won't have much of an effect (unless you get the wires crossed or mixed). However, a splice would probably fail a cable certifier test due to reflections. If you're not sure, and it's CAT5e/6, then just crimp and RJ45 connector on each end and use a proper female to femail ethernet connector:

ADSL2 only goes to about 2MHz bandwidth. 100baseT and 1000baseT go to

125 Mhz symbol rate.

Don't bother. Copper CAT5e runs about about 6.5 cents/ft in 1000ft rolls. Make sure you get solid copper and not CCA (copper clad aluminum). For example: Oh yeah, recycle the junk wire.

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Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com 
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Reply to
Jeff Liebermann

The different twists are a long-term thing, basically to keep different pairs from snuggling together and coupling. It's a sort randomizing thing, so splices don't matter.

This is typical:

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Sometimes individually-shielded pairs have different twists, sometimes not. I can't see why they would benefit from different twists.

I used some CAT6 for a non-Ethernet application, where prop delay skew mattered. I had to find shielded-pair cable F/FTP that had identical twists and low skew specs.

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John Larkin   Highland Technology, Inc   trk 

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Reply to
John Larkin

Double shielded CAT7?

Cable twist doesn't seem to matter much. I upgraded to 15Mb optical DSL. The tech found I was less than 1km from the switching office, so he connected me via ordinary twisted copper telephone wire. I have done a few speed tests, and it is actually a bit better than spec. There is no crosstalk from adjacent telephone conversations, alarms, or other traffic on the cable, probably since DSL operates at a much higher frequency. So dsl speed is not the problem. It's the stupid google ad sites and javascript and CSS that slow things down.

Fortunately, I am running Firefox version 12 on XP, and I have extensions to kill all these things except google. Updated Ad Blocker doesn't help. If it was a real problem, I'd write my own in Proxomitron. But it doesn't happen often enough to make it worthwhile.

Reply to
Steve Wilson

It's all impedance requirements, except for the bit about cross-talk.

A few splices are ok. the less you disturb the impedance the better.

yeah, but DSL broadband, ethernet is baseband.

CAT5 cable is not very expensive, the solid core stuff is recommended for inside walls.

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Reply to
Jasen Betts

I used what I have. It works but seems to be only 10 MB/sec. That is good e nough.

What gets me though is that I had a 75' and it was to the limit, I measured this one out and last I remember 16' X 4 is 64', plus 11' is 75'. But I ha ve all this extra. I dunno WTF here. Actually, that means I can bury the wi res in the walls even to to the upstairs apartment. And we got the wire for free. I might even run it out to the garage now. Screw all this extending the wifi shit.

Anyway, this PC (yes I am on it now) is for service info mainly, the bigges t file I ever got was like 137 MB. I think I can handle waiting 14 seconds.

Now I am off to upstairs to see if all my media is again available on our l ittle net here. Also this means bring able to print on the fancy LASER prin ter from anywhere in the house.

I can live with this.

Reply to
jurb6006

You're mixing leaves and trees here 10MB/s is 10 million bits/s, which turns to less than 800 kilobytes/s net speed, when the framing overhead is taken off. Depending on the transfer protocols, the real net speed may be down to 500 kilobytes/s.

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-TV
Reply to
Tauno Voipio

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