Soldering iron

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I think I want one with a straight conical tip and the soldering iron  
that I already own has a tip which looks like a cylinder cut off at an  
angle (does that make sense? If not, see  
https://www.gearbest.com/soldering-supplies/pp_248246.html ).  Any  
recommendations?

Re: Soldering iron
On Mon, 25 Jun 2018 15:42:14 +0100, Peter Percival wrote:

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That's a chisel tip. Just get a new tip (if they are available) such
as:
https://www.gearbest.com/soldering-supplies/pp_862011.html?wid14%33363

--  
Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
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Re: Soldering iron
On 25/06/2018 15:42, Peter Percival wrote:
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The TS100 is the one to go for these days, microprocessor controlled
to keep pumping heat to the tip if the tip is in contact with a
large area.



Re: Soldering iron
On Mon, 25 Jun 2018 15:42:14 +0100, Peter Percival wrote:

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The best electronic soldering irons I've used have been 45 watt Wellers  
with conical 0.8mm tips - but they weren't cheap, but that was a while  
back. The current range are even more expensive and 90 or 120 watt irons.  
The best feature of the Weller range is that the temperature control is  
nearly failproof, being a magnetic microswitch just behind the tip. There  
is a magnet at the rear of the tip. Like all magnets, it loses its  
magnetism when heated to its Curie point: this turns the microswitch off.  
It turns back on again as the tip drops below the Curie point and regains  
its magnetism. IOW you specify a tip by the shape, diameter *and* the  
temperature you require.


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Soldering iron
On a sunny day (Mon, 25 Jun 2018 15:12:16 +0000 (UTC)) it happened Martin

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I have used wellers at work and had one myself.
The mechanical switch that is controlled by that magnet causes RF interference
you do not want when working with sensitive RF equipment.
I do not like the build quailty of wellers much, mine fell apart in the end,
and WAY too expensive compared to what you can get with real adjustable
(need that!!) temperature control.
See my other posting for what I use .



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Re: Soldering iron
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I miss my old Weller. I bought it 2nd hand and I had it for 35 years and
used it very regularly and one day it just stopped. I think the
transformer decided to give up after all those years. Used a wet sponge
on it all the time without any issues.

https://unicorn.drogon.net/weller.jpg

In desperation, I bought a cheapish temp controlled one (from Maplin)
with a view to replacing it with a Metcal one day - but that was 3 years
ago and I'm still waiting for it to stop working or need a new tip,
despite near daily use with a wet sponge.

Gordon

Re: Soldering iron
On Tue, 26 Jun 2018 12:12:09 +0000, Gordon Henderson wrote:

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I was given what looks like an identical Weller to yours, but its stand  
was just that so, as I said elsewhere, I put a suitably sized transformer  
in a box and screwed the stand on top of that. It was a good iron for  
many years but eventually the wet sponge (or something) ate a hole in one  
side of the bit and that was that.

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Same here, though my original Maplins died after several years. Its  
slightly more expensive replacement is still going strong, though  
admittedly it doesn't get the amount of use as its predecessor.
  

--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Soldering iron
Gordon Henderson wrote on 26/06/2018 :
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I think I have had the same one, in occasional use for around 12 years  
- grey plastic, LCD actual temperature display + one for the required  
temperature, on/off switch and temperature up/down. The original  
element failed a few weeks after I bought it, so I bought a few spares  
and a few spare tips. Since when it has worked flawlessly on that  
second element and original tip. All it is missing is a run / standby  
switch to keep it warm ready to use, instead of dropping the  
temperature.

Re: Soldering iron
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Still use my Weller TCP (as you describe above) which I bought at
university 38 years ago, and has had loads of use. Been through lots
of bits (the iron plating wears off after a while, and then they don't
wet nicely), but the iron is the original. I ordered the iron and PSU
through the university physics department. The lab technician crossed
the PSU off my order and gave me an old broken one instead, saying
"I'm sure you can fix that", which I did (the socket was loose, has
rotated and shorted out the 24V supply, and blown the internal fuse),
so the PSU is even older.

I also have an Antex TCS 50W temperature controlled iron which I carry
around to repair events because it's lightweight without a base unit,
and good value for money, but you'll struggle to find for any other
iron with bits as good quality and wide range of shapes as the Weller
TCP curie effect bits - a product line that's over 50 years old and
still has every spare part available.

--  
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

Re: Soldering iron
On Mon, 25 Jun 2018 15:42:14 +0100, Peter Percival

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Presuming you linked to the tip that fits your (unnamed) soldering iron,
there seem to be many available...

https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=hakko+936+soldering+tips&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid22%9132063907&hvpos=1t1&hvnetw=g&hvrand72%38596309438814336&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy90%17451&hvtargid=kwd-301251232535&ref=pd_sl_5vl9q5chk8_b_p37


--  
    Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN
     snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com    HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/

Re: Soldering iron
On a sunny day (Mon, 25 Jun 2018 15:42:14 +0100) it happened Peter Percival

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I have been using this for more than 10 years, almost every day:
 https://www.maerklin.de/en/products/details/article/70910/
unfortunately it is no longer made.

Some years ago I did see the same for sale as a no-name thing,
mine is labelled 'Voltcraft LS50'

One thing, NEVER use a wet sponge to clean plated tips, it kills those,
always wipe it clean with some paper napkin.
That way, at least for me, the tips last forever.
The wet sponge thing is a trick to sell tips.

And you need temperature control.



Re: Soldering iron
On Mon, 25 Jun 2018 15:59:13 GMT
  
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Not on your jeans?   :-)

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I thought it was just appropriate for unplated copper tips.


Re: Soldering iron
On a sunny day (Mon, 25 Jun 2018 21:12:22 +0100) it happened Rob Morley

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Removing solder from your jeans is easy,
Cotton is OK, it is harder from nylon or polyester based stuff :-)


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http://panteltje.com/pub/soldering_tips.jpg
The short ones are Weller, the long ones are from the LS50.
on the Weller tips you can see the metal piece that loses its magnetic properties
connected to it at the right side.  

The top one is Weller, used a lot with a wet sponge,
tip will erode away just above the plating.
Then an other bigger Weller, not much used,
and one up from bottom a Weller cleaned with paper towel.

The bottom one is the size I normally use (SMDs etc),
and now 13 years later even looks better:
 http://panteltje.com/pub/soldering_iron_tips_IMG_6436.JPG
From left to right:
Weller number 7, Weller number 7, Weller number 7, LS50 tips.
Those numbers, engraved on the tips, indicate the temperature,
number 7 is 370 C.

I usually, with the LS50, work at much lower temperatures,
with 60/40 solder at 270 or 320C, 375C burns the insulation of magnet wire.


In a very big US company I worked someone in the production department cleaned the tips by rubbing on:
 a big blob of solder!
That is where I came up with the idea of a using paper towel for cleaning.
Fold it a couple of times, no worry, it does not even catch fire at 370C,
neither does it burn your fingers, just leaves some black stripes on the paper from the accumulated crap on the tips.

Soldering irons is a bit like religions, everybody has their own and is always right.
So for what it is worth :-)

When soldering on the Pi (If you MUST, you should not have to) beware of static discharge, do not use
one of those directly mains powered irons etc.
And do not use a soldering gun, somebody enthusiastically told me, hey I bough a soldering gun,
now I can do...
No you cannot.
:-)



Re: Soldering iron
On Tue, 26 Jun 2018 06:41:54 +0000, Jan Panteltje wrote:

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:-)

Good tip to use paper to clean Weller tips, though. Mine went exactly the  
same way, but as I said, it was a older 45 watt type, which I ran off a  
simple transformer and diode block, probably with a smoothing  
electrolytic as well.

These days I'm using a Maplins (RIP) DC iron with a settable temp (but no  
actual temp display), but at least the iron hasn't done any static-
related damage (yet). Disposable. When it breaks I'll get something a bit  
better.
  
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:-)

I had a solder gun when I was young and stupid, but quickly found it was  
useless for both electrical and mechanical soldering.

I do all light mechanical soldering with a 56g copper iron with a wooden  
handle heated over a gas ring. I use Baker's Fluid as the flux and clean  
the iron with Bakers fluid and a small file. Simple. Traditional. Works  
every time.  

If you need to do this type of soldering, the gory details are here:  

https://www.gregorie.org/freeflight/soldering/soldering.html


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Soldering iron
On Tue, 26 Jun 2018 06:41:54 GMT
  
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Just don't get used to wiping on your jeans and one day forget you're
wearing shorts.  :-o

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You do if you bought one without GPIO header pins.

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The main thing I use my soldering gun for is cutting thermoplastics.


Re: Soldering iron
On a sunny day (Tue, 26 Jun 2018 16:10:37 +0100) it happened Rob Morley

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That is now what I use the eroded Weller tip for,
it does fit into the LS50, temperature controlled
hole making and cutting.

But really, dremel is better and does not smell so much.



Re: Soldering iron
On Tue, 26 Jun 2018 15:26:33 GMT

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That depends very much on the application:  cutting textiles with heat
can seal the edges to prevent fraying.  Also thin rigid plastics cut
with heat can have a thickened bead along the edge that reinforces it
and avoids making a rough/sharp edge.


Re: Soldering iron
On a sunny day (Wed, 27 Jun 2018 14:35:08 +0100) it happened Rob Morley

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Yes, some applicatons, sure.
I tried plastic welding with it,
but modern glue is amazing.
The rim along the edges is what I what to get rid of when making holes for say connectors...
I found this the perfect tool to make holes in plastic for 3.5 mm phono jacks:
 http://panteltje.com/pub/hole_making_tool_IMG_6437.JPG
:-)

Re: Soldering iron
On Mon, 25 Jun 2018 21:12:22 +0100, Rob Morley wrote:

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i find my finger tips adequate (they soon build up immunity to the temp)
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--  
There is hopeful symbolism in the fact that flags do not wave in a vacuum.
        -- Arthur C. Clarke

Re: Soldering iron
On Monday, 25 June 2018 15:42:16 UTC+1, Peter Percival  wrote:
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Aldi had a temp-controlled soldering iron with conical tip for under twenty quid, a couple of weeks ago, if you're in the UK. Still some in stock last time I looked.  

Owain


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