New guy with a question.

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Hi all.  I'm a new guy here*.  I just bought a Raspberry 3B and have it up and  
running.  But, I want to run Seti@Home on it.  I've installed boinc, it works,  
Einstein@Home is processing on it now.  Unfortunately the seti client appears to  
be a 7.* version and I need the 8.* version.  Does anyone have an idea where I  
can get one?  I guess I'll ask another question since I'm here...If I find one,  
assuming there's no nice automagical install procedure, how do I plug it into  
the OS?

*I'm not a complete newbie.  I've used various versions of UNIX, I ftp'd linux  
1.something onto 8 bazillion 1.44mb floppies when it came out, had a SUN Sparc  
hidden under my desk.  Run openSuse on several computers at home now days.

Re: New guy with a question.
On Mon, 13 Feb 2017 12:20:19 -0700, Sidney_Kotic wrote:

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The 8.* version was released by Set1@Home in April 2016 and should be  
available from there. I found the rather cryptic advice to get it "From  
the project, Attach your Arm device to Setiathome as you would any other  
computer." at https://setiathome.berkeley.edu/forum_thread.php?id79%387
  
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Depends what format it in. If its a .deb file, install as a normal  
package. If its an executable, put it in /usr/local/bin because thats the  
recommended place to put all executables that aren't part of packages and  
put configuration files, etc where the installation documentation says  
they should, except for anything that should go in /etc - try putting  
this in /usr/local/etc first and only move it to /etc of seti@home can't  
find it there.

The advantage of putting your own and 3rd party programs, config  
files etc. in the /usr/local/* directory tree is that they won't get  
accidentally clobbered by normal updates and upgrades, which is always a  
possibility for files and executables plonked into /bin, /usr/bin and /etc
but are still easily accessable because /usr/local/bin and /usr/local/sbin  
should be included in $PATH by default and all properly written programs  
should search for configuration files etc. by looking in  

 .:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin

in that order.


--  
martin@   | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. | Essex, UK
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Re: New guy with a question.
On Mon, 13 Feb 2017 20:07:37 +0000, Martin Gregorie wrote:

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Should, of course, have been

  .:/usr/local/etc:/etc

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--  
martin@   | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. | Essex, UK
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Re: New guy with a question.
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Point of order: it's generally not a good idea to have '.' on your path,
because then you risk your system tools being clobbered by ones in the
current directory.  For instance, you download a tarball, unpack, cd into it
and type 'ls'.  If the tarball contains a malicious program called 'ls' then
you've just executed it.

Prefix program names with './' if you want to run ones in the current
directory.

Theo

Re: New guy with a question.
On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 08:40:25 +0000, Theo wrote:

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Agreed - if its at the front of the $PATH list. OTOH I see nothing wrong  
with *appending* :~/bin:. to $PATH. Been  doing it for years with no bad  
effects.

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Yes, if you're using sudo execution, because $PATH as defined in your  
user profile is pushed aside in the sudo environment.

However, you probably saw my later correction and now know that I meant  
to write ".:/usr/local/etc:/etc" because I was talking about my preferred  
search order when looking for configuration files.

The reason for this preference is because it allows a site configuration  
in /usr/local/etc to override a default configuration in /etc while  
allowing any site-specific configuration to be overridden by a locally  
declared one in the current directory. This can be very useful during  
program development because it lets the special testing configuration(s)  
override the normal configuration.
  

--  
martin@   | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. | Essex, UK
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Re: New guy with a question.
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The risk here is from typos.

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Testing is normally done by specifying an alternative configuration via
a command-line argument or an environment variable.

For production uses, /etc is not there to provide defaults; it is there
to provide the live configuration.

--  
http://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/

Re: New guy with a question.
On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 10:22:14 +0000, Richard Kettlewell wrote:

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Command-line override is always an additional nice to have.

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Depends. I'd agree for anything out of a standard package, but for  
anything from a third party source or locally developed, I think /etc/
local/etc  is a better place for its configuration. For one thing, if  
/usr/local is a symlink pointing to, say, /home/local then provided that  
/home is in a partition that's not reformatted during a clean system  
reinstall,  there's no danger of the reinstall clobbering third party  
softare configurations.
  

--  
martin@   | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. | Essex, UK
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Re: New guy with a question.
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You would have to do a typo which happens to turn into a program which
can cause you some harm, which strikes me as very unlikely.

I've had '.' at the end of my PATH for dozens of years and that hasn't
happened to me yet.  But I have save lots of time over the years by
not typing "./".  YMMV.

Cheers.

                                Jim

Re: New guy with a question.
snipped-for-privacy@deletethis.AcadiaU.ca says...
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Perhaps not that unlikely, since a good strategy for malware authors  
might be to pick a common typing error as the name of their program.

--  
Cheers,
John

Re: New guy with a question.
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See also "Midnight Commander" (mc) and why I uninstall it from any
system that includes it.

Elijah
------
ld is useful, even if also typed accidentally

Re: New guy with a question.
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The big differences here are appending them (so an intruder cannot
stuff in eg. a new ls) and using ~/bin, not ~/ . A local /bin is a place
where you put executables you are in good control of, not some random
stuff in your ~/ . And don't do this as root, but as a normal user, and
I would think you would be pretty safe.

At least some orders of magnitude better than some known office packages
that automatically executes incoming emails.

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I concur with both of you, and you are not in such disagreement.

/etc is the global, live configuration of the machine. Updated
via repositories.

/usr/local/etc is for the development and local specialities, to
be updated manually. This is for where the local installation deviates
from what comes with the repositories.

~/etc is for the personal stuff, eg. a newer version, or one
specially built from sources.

-- mrr




Re: New guy with a question.
On 02/13/2017 01:07 PM, Martin Gregorie wrote:

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Frustrating.  Lots of information seemingly about how to make it work better,  
but nothing that tells you how to get it.

FYI, the only thing I've seen that's even close it is to issue a
sudo apt-get update boinc-client boinc-manager
which tells me every things current and nothing was done.  Still got version 7*  
there so S@H still won't give me tasks.

I've got some other stuff in the mail, part of which is a new SD cards with  
Raspbian for a 3B pre-installed.  I'll dd it and then lay that over the current  
installation and start from scratch.  Who knows, it might work (not holding my  
breath though).

Re: New guy with a question.
On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 18:00:25 -0700, Sidney_Kotic wrote:

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One of the posts on the the Seti@Home site page announcing 8.1 for RPI  
said something like "Connect to the site and download it as usual", which  
implies that more complete instructions should be somewhere on that site.  

Looking for the boinc manpage might be a good idea.

Its a very long time since I gave up on running Seti@home (when I  
replaced my old Pentium 4 home server with a Dual Athlon box). I was  
happy to share unused cycles on a fixed frequency chip, less so when boinc  
caused the Athlon to run flat out with a howling fan for 24/7: that's  
scarcely unused cycles or wasted electricity.  

I might consider doing it again on an RPi except that back in the day  
some boinc clients were greedy and refused to run on the P4, claiming it  
was too slow to bother with.
  

--  
martin@   | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. | Essex, UK
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Re: New guy with a question.

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Oh? All I did was install boinc-client and then run  

boinccmd --project_attach http://setiathome.berkeley.edu (key)

and that was that. After a few minutes
/var/lib/boinc-client/stdoutdae.txt showed:

15-Feb-2017 14:58:19 [SETI@home] Scheduler request completed: got 4 new tasks
15-Feb-2017 14:58:21 [SETI@home] Started download of setiathome_8.02_arm-unknown-linux-gnueabihf
15-Feb-2017 14:58:38 [SETI@home] Finished download of setiathome_8.02_arm-unknown-linux-gnueabihf
15-Feb-2017 14:58:38 [SETI@home] Starting task 28mr08ah.1771.25021.11.38.67_1
15-Feb-2017 14:58:38 [SETI@home] Starting task 28mr08ah.1771.25021.11.38.73_0
15-Feb-2017 14:58:38 [SETI@home] Starting task 28mr08ah.1771.25021.11.38.79_0
15-Feb-2017 14:58:38 [SETI@home] Starting task 28mr08ah.1771.25021.11.38.85_0


Re: New guy with a question.

I'm wondering if it has to do with the fact that I joined the SETI project in 1999.

In any event I've decided to run:
Einstein@Home    been running this since SIMAP went away.
Evolution@Home   if I can figure out how to get to it.  Go through yoyo and  
specify that I want to run only Evolution?
Find@Home        which I already have joined.
SETI Beta        once I figure out what the old SETI has in it so I can rejoin?
Universe@Home    new one, haven't tried to get to it yet.

Listed in alphabetical order, not by preference.

On 5 Intel machines I'm running Rosetta and World Community Grid.  Four Pi3B's  
running all the stuff above when I get it figured out.

Re: New guy with a question.

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Why do you feel you need BOINC v8? BOINC v7.4.23 and the projects below
all run okay on my Pi 3's.

http://findah.ucd.ie/
http://albert.phys.uwm.edu/
http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/
https://boinc.thesonntags.com/collatz/
http://universeathome.pl/universe/
http://asteroidsathome.net/boinc/
http://setiweb.ssl.berkeley.edu/beta/
http://www.rechenkraft.net/yoyo/
http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/
http://www.enigmaathome.net/

--  
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

Re: New guy with a question.
On 02/13/2017 12:20 PM, Sidney_Kotic wrote:
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blather...blather...

OK, here's how the one Pi is running...
1. Einstein working.
2. Evolution seems to be working, no data yet, and I did have to go to yoyo and  
specify I only wanted this work.
3. Find seems to be OK, has no data as yet though, but the site indicates that's  
the way things are.
4. Universe working.
5. Seti is processing data.  Which tells me I had to join the beta project.  I  
totally messed around with this so I'm not sure if I need the original Seti or  
not.  As someone said...I checked the preferences on the Seti site and it is set  
to V8.

I'll hopefully know more by weeks end, and I get the other 3 running, if anybody  
wants to know.

A big thanks to all for the support.

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