Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it

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and voice assistance projects have used AI to better the lives of  
users. The Google Home voice-based hardware unit brings its assistant  
to life, making traditional inputs and displays unnecessary. With just  
the power of your voice, you can interact with the device -- nothing  
else is needed. The search giant has decided to take artificial  
intelligence to the maker community with a new initiative called AIY.  

the public that makers can leverage in a simple way. Today, Google  
announces... [Continue Reading]

http://feeds.betanews.com/~r/bn/~3/AxFs2TePA00/

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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Thu, 04 May 2017 23:01:06 -0300, Internetado wrote:


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Two probably dodgy assumptions here:

- that you want an always-on microphone connected to the Googleplex  
  in your living space. I don't.

- that a speech recognition system connected to a fixed range of
  applications merits being called an Artificial Intelligence.  

As far as I'm concerned anything that is claimed to be an Artificial  
Intelligence has to be able to pass the Turing test as a bare minimum  
requirement. None of these things, whether from Apple, Amazon or Google  
even come close to doing that.


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martin@   | Martin Gregorie
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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
Martin Gregorie wrote:

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I realise that any microphone connected to a computer is best treated as  
though it is "always on" but you do seem to have to press the button to  
talk to the AI-in-a-box.


Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Fri, 05 May 2017 11:56:27 +0100, Andy Burns wrote:

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Is that true of Google's Alexa equivalent when its on a phone or a PC? If  
not, are you sure the button isn't just added decoration on this thing?

Alexa, for one, doesn't do voice recognition and, as a result, has been  
triggered to buy something by a voice on the TV. At least twice.

Obligatory XKCD: https://www.xkcd.com/1807/



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martin@   | Martin Gregorie
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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
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It is on mine.

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The Alexa in a Fire TV needs a button press to activate. (I don?t know
about its other deployments, offhand.)

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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
Martin Gregorie wrote:

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AIUI the phone is listening locally for the "OK google" trigger phrase,  
then it starts listening properly and sending audio back to base to be  
decoded ... once or twice I've heard the phone say "If you just said  
something, I didn't catch what it was" when I haven't uttered the  
trigger phrase, as a coincidence it happened last night while I was  
listening to the radio, so I pressed rewind by a few seconds and thought  
I would tell what it had confused for the the trigger phrase, but it  
didn't trigger second time around.

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Dunno, it might be able to be configured to listen 24x7, but the guy  
demoing it kept hitting the supplied button each time he spoke to it,  
guess it'll be in people's hands (from the magazine give-away) soon  
enough that people will be making unboxing videos about it ...


Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Fri, 5 May 2017 10:09:20 -0000 (UTC)

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    Agreed.

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    The problem with that term is that it has *way* too many
interpretations.

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    So the one that is currently the world's best Go player doesn't
qualify ? How about the ones that generate pictures based on a short
description ? Or the ones that learn languages and are currently being used
to try and learn dolphin language ?

    Passing a Turing test calls for either something designed for
conversation or an artificial general intelligence. The latter is a current
hot research target in AI, most of the older single purpose AI targets have
been well and truly met now.

    There's an odd thing about AI - every time some goal for AI
development is reached there's a bunch of people explaining why the solution
wasn't really AI just something else (Machine Learning is a popular name at
the moment).

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    They don't even try, the main thing for them is reliable voice
recognition regardless of accent or language with a decent tolerance for
background noise. That's AI but the kind of single purpose AI that can be
done very well these days.

    I know a practical test for artificial self awareness - when an
AI asks "what's in it for me" and means it that AI has to be treated as self
aware.

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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Fri, 05 May 2017 13:14:44 +0100, Ahem A Rivet's Shot wrote:

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Definitely not. Just as chess programs and IBM's Watson do not - the  
latter has to be trained specifically for whatever you want it to do.  

I'd agree that Watson and equivalent frameworks count as Expert Systems,  
but not as AIs.  

Try this for size: to pass as an AI, a system must:

1) pass the Turing Test in more than one domain

2) when asked a question in a domain it has learned it must be able to  
   (a)give a correct answer and (b) explain how it arrived at it

3) be able to learn how to play a game or to understand a technology by
   reading a book or manual (chess, go, C) or the game's instructions
   (monopoly, D&D)

4) be able to absorb more than one knowledge domain without getting
   confused.

Current systems can do 1 and 2a though I don't think anything can do  
both, and no current neural net-based system can do 2b. AFAIK nothing  
currently comes even close to tackling 3 or 4.


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Can any make Celia Russell style word pictures? That should be quite easy  
since the word is part of the picture:

http://www.russellart.co.nz/Cecilia_Russell_ART._NZ._russellart.co.nz.html


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Are these just neural networks or something better and more flexible?
  
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Quite and IMHO thats what the term should be reserved for.

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I'd reverse that and say that whenever somebody has a new product that  
just a phrase->action mapper Siri, Alexa) or something a bit more  
interesting but that still can't explain how it reached the answer it  
gave, some idiot marketeer still calls it an AI.


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martin@   | Martin Gregorie
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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On 05/05/17 14:03, Martin Gregorie wrote:
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many usenet posters would fail that.

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A majorette of usenet posters would fail that.

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Few people can do that these days.

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No one in politics would pass that.

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The Rise of the Machines looms doesn't it?


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private property.

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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Fri, 05 May 2017 14:47:02 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

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and cudent even spel "Touring Test".

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That depends on which ng you're posting in.  
  
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Do you mean they can't use book learning or don't want to?

I hate to trying to learn anything from a video because the data rate is  
typically so much slower than reading text and because its difficult to  
stick bookmarks in a video.

In short, colour me totally bemused as to why anybody would choose to  
learn from a video when they can find a book or written instructions on  
the net. I suppose the only exception would be when its some really  
tricky manual operation and seeing it done beats looking at photos or  
diagrams.
  
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Very true.
  
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Still glowering distantly on the horizon: not nearly as looming as some  
would have us believe.



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martin@   | Martin Gregorie
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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it

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"Six weaks ago I cuddnt even spel 'porgramr' - and now I are one."

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alt.malaprop?

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I'm with you.  Text lets you proceed at my own pace, whether slower or
faster than a video - and you can jump back and review earlier material
at any time.

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Agreed, there are cases where watching something helps everything fall
into place in your mind.

    I hear and I forget.
    I see and I remember.
    I do and I understand.
      -- Confucius

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I'm less concerned about the machines than about the governments and
megacorps that program them.

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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Fri, 5 May 2017 13:03:03 -0000 (UTC)

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    Ah these things are called general Artificial Intelligence these
days. Hot research topic.

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    There is definitely progress being made on 3 and as a result 4,
nothing by way of products but a good many papers and results.

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    Neural networks with memory and some fancy self training AFAICT.

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    Trouble is that leaves no term for things like the above which are
not general AI but are also not programmed explicitly.

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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Fri, 05 May 2017 16:04:54 +0100, Ahem A Rivet's Shot wrote:

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That doesn't surprise me at all, though I don't like that term much as is  
sounds more than slightly premature.

  
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Sounds good.
  
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I though that would be the case.  

I find this type of system a bit worrying because if you can't make a  
complex algorithm show you how it solved a problem it can be really hard  
to tell whether its answer is valid or to fix bugs.
  
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Maybe better names would be Trainable Algorithm if it can't explain how  
it got its answer or Expert Algorithm  if it can.  

I think you have to use different names because whether an algorithm can  
explain itself should be a major factor when you're deciding how much you  
trust its output. After all, that's no different to how you decide  
whether to trust what a human tells you.


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martin@   | Martin Gregorie
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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Fri, 5 May 2017 17:28:00 -0000 (UTC)

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    There is that - OTOH sometimes the answer is hard to find but easy
to verify and in those cases something that can get there somehow will do
just fine.

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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Fri, 5 May 2017 17:28:00 -0000 (UTC)

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    AFAICT the term has arisen to acknowledge that it's something
that's not yet possible but being worked at and to distinguish it from the
various flavours of single task AI which are getting pretty sophisticated
these days.

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    This is true - although sometimes you trust a human based on
experience of success rather than explanations, I expect the same will hold
for general AI if/when it happens.
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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it

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Once it masters that, we can move on to Scott Kim:

http://www.scottkim.com.previewc40.carrierzone.com/inversions/

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Anything to suck in the masses.  Marketroids aren't quite the idiots
that we might like to think they are.

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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Fri, 05 May 2017 17:06:33 +0000, Charlie Gibbs wrote:

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Cecilia_Russell_ART._NZ._russellart.co.nz.html
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Cute, though I prefer M C Escher's stuff when it messing with  
perspectives, permutations, etc.
  


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martin@   | Martin Gregorie
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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Thu, 04 May 2017 23:01:06 -0300, Internetado wrote:


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Are their any guides to getting this working from a stock raspian start  
point?
I want to try use my pi zero-w (posibly in a new case) without fully  
replacing its current setup.

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Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On 09/05/2017 17:43, alister wrote:
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No guide but start from here  
https://aiyprojects.withgoogle.com/voice/#makers-guide-1-1--source-code

Re: Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it
On Wed, 10 May 2017 11:35:35 +0200, A. Dumas wrote:

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many thanks although I ended up using the google supplied Distro any way.
All working without issue on a Pi Zero W :-)




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