For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use

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Query: which Raspberry Pi image to choose for the Pi to run basic services  
like the following

  a DHCP server,
  a DNS server,
  a TFTP server,
  a PXE server,
  others

Is it as simple as choosing Arch Linux because it is labelled as  
"lightweight"? Anyone have experience of running a Pi or two to supply basic  
network services such as those above and a few more?

James



Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 17/04/2014 08:56, James Harris wrote:
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I don't know much about Arch Linux but I believe the best supported,  
most frequently updated OS is Raspbian, also the preferred OS by the  
foundation and as far as I know the only way to get firmware updates.  
It's more or less the same as Debian Linux and it should run any of  
those servers you mention. Lightweight, well, you don't HAVE to boot to  
desktop and you might find services/packages to disable/uninstall.

Frankly, if "lightweight" is the only relevant thing you can come up  
with in a comparison of rpi OS's, you need documentation and support and  
Raspbian is the way to go. See also http://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/

Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 17/04/2014 11:13, A. Dumas wrote:
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Quite. I can't see any point in using anything other than Raspbian for  
this sort of thing (although I use Raspbmc for my Pi media centre).

Another Dave
--  
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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 17/04/14 15:31, Another Dave wrote:
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IIRC the first time I used Linux for any 'real' work this was the  
services it ran, on a 386sx with about 256M ram.

its so low powered as far as apps go that the chip will probably need a  
hot water bottle;-)


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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
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You sure about the 256M RAM?  My 386SX had 4x 30 pin SIMM slots - max RAM
4MB (though I hear 16MB was possible with rare 4MB 30 pin SIMMs).  256MB
wasn't affordable until 2000 or so.

I ran Linux, X and Netscape with 4MB RAM (and a lot of swapping).  I suspect
the 'minimal server' services probably would have fitted in 4MB back then.

Anyway, back to the present - I think I could probably fit them on my
64MB VPS running Debian, so I suspect a Pi isn't going to have a problem.

Theo

Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On Fri, 18 Apr 2014 16:15:04 +0100, Theo Markettos wrote:

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For a long time my main house server was an 866 KHz P4 box with 256MB,  
then 512MB and running PostFix, PostgreSQL, DNS, Apache and  
SqueezeboxServer with little visible strain. It only got handed on about  
3/4 years ago when the Fedora installer suddenly decided it wouldn't run  
in less than 1GB RAM, and that box was already on its limit with 512MB.
  
I've always felt, but haven't tried it, that a 512MB RPi model B with  
either a USB disk or a NAS box for storage should fairly easily do the  
same.


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martin@   | Martin Gregorie
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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 18/04/14 17:19, Martin Gregorie wrote:
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For sure I am running a massively heavy trafficked web server on 384M ram.


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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 18 Apr 2014 16:15:04 +0100 (BST)

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I had (probably still have somewhere) a 486SX25 (later upgraded to
486DX33) with I think 8MB RAM and an ISA modem that ran LRP at first,
and later Smoothwall.


Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 18/04/14 16:15, Theo Markettos wrote:
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Might have been less. Anyway it worked


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I've run an early UNIX on less than 1M RAM


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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 17/04/2014 20:22, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
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More likely to have been 256KB!

---druck


Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 18/04/14 21:03, druck wrote:
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Might well have been.

I remeber JUST getting X-windows going on a 386 with 4Mbyte RAM..


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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use

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Way back in about 1992 I managed to compile early X from source on a
386SX33 with (at the end, as I recall) 16MB of RAM.
It took a *week* !

Says a hell of a lot about the robustness of Linux that I succeeded.

But to use the result was little more than a proof-of-feasibility
exercise, because everything took minutes to execute.

--  
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J.R.R. Tolkien:-                            @ S c o t s h o m e . c o m
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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On Fri, 18 Apr 2014 21:03:52 +0100, druck wrote:

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128MB for me.

But, I haven't seen anything running useful numbers of independent  
(interactive and batch) jobs in that little memory since the mid '70s.  

Those boxes all had ICL 1904S or 1904T written on them and ran the George  
3 OS. One I was sysadmin for were:
- a 1903S with 32kWords/96Kb/128Kch memory, 2 x 60Mb disks and 6 x MT
  running at a 300KHz clock speed,  
  which ran 4 interactive and 1 or 2 batch jobs

- a 1905T with 256K/words/756KB/1026kCh memory, 4 x 200MB disks and 6 x
  MT running at maybe 900 KHz clock speed. This box ran the British Steel
  Battersea research lab, which did active development in PLAN assembler,
  Algol 60, Algol 68R and Fortran with significant engineering modelling
  runs.

OK, these were gym-sized installations, but this was the first generation  
to use IC circuits (look up 74xx TTL chips to see just what each chip  
could do) and think just how you'd support that workload with that  
hardware (a 2MHz 6809 was faster) and consider it did automatic disk  
backup to tape, optimised file storage between online disks and offline  
tapes and (this was 1977) had almost as good a scripting language as  
Linux.


--  
martin@   | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. | Essex, UK
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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 4/18/2014 5:27 PM, Martin Gregorie wrote:
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                                                   ^^^^

Really !!!

60 Mega bit  !!!!



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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
Martin Gregorie wrote:

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[ ... ]
For me it was a GE-415 of almost exactly the same size.  Only one concurrent  
program, but it ran teller terminal operations for an entire bank, in 1971.

Modern computing started with the adoption of semiconductor memory in the  
early '80s.  Ferrite core memory was too expensive for many outfits to have  
much of it.  It was rare to see commercial sites with more than a megabyte.  
Huge, affordable, semiconductor memories made it possible to have huge,  
fast, databases, and that made it feasible to move away from batch  
processing and concentrate on interactive on-demand processing.  Our banking  
system handled just a few kinds of heavily optimized transactions.  With  
lots of fast memory, just about anything could be a transaction.  The other  
thing that happened was graphical user interfaces.  With GUIs you use large  
amounts of memory and processor power just to form the characters you use to  
display your output.  So with graphics using up the memory meant for niftier  
applications, people have to buy even larger memories to run their programs  
again.  And it's all cheap enough that we can.

    Mel.

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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On Sat, 19 Apr 2014 00:22:38 -0400, Mel Wilson wrote:

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Quite: by the late 70s/early 80s the BBC was dual running 2966 systems:  
one for live operation and the other for development/failover. It was  
effectively a single large roomfull of kit, all connected to something  
that looked like a major railway yard's control board and that defined  
exactly what made up the Prod and Dev machines at any point in time. But  
I digress: the point is that these boxes  supported around 300-400 green-
screen 80x25 displays but only needed 8MB of RAM to run the 8 - 10 large  
online systems needed to support the Beeb's operations on Prod and all  
the development teams on Dev.

BTW, these systems were all written in COBOL and used the IDMSX network  
database, which used physical pointers to represent relationships between  
entities. The compilers were good, averaging three, very complex,  
instructions per COBOL sentence. This was possible because sentences like  
"MOVE ALL SPACE TO TABLE-A" compiled down to a single instruction.
  

--  
martin@   | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. | Essex, UK
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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
declaimed the following:

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    Was fun looking into my campus computer... 1 MB of 4-bank/4-port
interleaved memory (256MB per "refrigerator"). Used to be magnetic core,
but had been replaced by static RAM... Open the cabinet to see one ~18x18
inch circuit board.

    Xerox Sigma 6 (horrors: DTL mainframe)... As I recall, it was a big
event when a pair of 300MB disk packs were added to the 6 100MB packs (and
I'm talking the 11 platter packs -- 20 usable surfaces, of 5MB each?).

    System used to support ~50 concurrent log-ins though it did result in
longer turn-around time for interactive compiles. That is, when the
Honeywell Level 6 programmed as a terminal server that replaced a room full
of Gandalf equipment didn't get hot. Main circuit board was mounted
horizontally, and would /sag/ when warm -- breaking connections.
--  
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     snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com    HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/

Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
[....]
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Heck -- you were at Battersea...?  I guess I beat you by a little (:-))
When I was there (in Control Engineering) it was still BISRA!  No computers
there (though quite a bit of digital -- everything through valves, transistors,
to uniselectors!); Park Lane HQ had a Pegasus.

Dunno if I'm the champ in computer memory, too, but I did my first real
programming on a PDP-8 with *8K* of 12-bit words!  It was a great day
when we got a disk with -- I think -- 256K.

    -- Pete --


Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:40:45 -0500, Pete wrote:

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The first computer I used was an Elliott 503 scientific computer with  
8Kwords of 3.6 uS main ferrite core memory and, IIRC, 32 Kwords of 50 uS  
ferrite core backing store; it used this as the equivalent of a disk  
drive, loading programs from it or using it as scratch area. Elliott  
words were 39 bit, so no double length arithmetic was needed or provided,  
but each word held two instructions.

Its only peripherals were paper tape readers and punches, a lineprinter  
and a control typewriter, which interacted with a 25 word 'operating  
system' and was programmed on Algol 60 or assembler.

More gory details here:
http://www.retrocomputingtasmania.com/home/projects/elliott-503

Either 33 or 39 were delivered, all between 1963 and 1966, so the last  
503s were delivered about the same time as the first PDP-8s.


--  
martin@   | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. | Essex, UK
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Re: For a minimal server which Raspberry Pi Linux image to use
On 24.4.14 22:13, Martin Gregorie wrote:
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The 503 was the blindingly fast one - the 803 ran the same code, but
in serial mode: 288 us basic cycle and 576 us an instruction. It could
chew an Algol program with the compiler for well over an hour, to spew
then an error ...

The 803 was the second computer for me, after an IBM 1620.

--  

Tauno Voipio


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