What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?

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I would like to test my 9V, C, D, AA, and AAA under the proper load. I don'
t know what that would be for each size though. I want to build a little te
st fixture for this with a meter and the appropriate load connected for eac
h size. Can someone please tell me what the appropriate loads would be. Tha
nks, Lenny

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 07:20:39 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com
wrote:

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Well, you could try bouncing the cells:
<http://gizmodo.com/an-amazingly-simple-way-to-test-if-a-battery-is-dead-1138197569
<https://lifehacker.com/test-if-your-batteries-are-dead-by-dropping-them-on-a-h-1630525062
I tried it and couldn't make it work, but maybe you'll have better
luck.

Lots of commercial alkaline battery testers available.  I have one of
these:
<http://www.ebay.com/itm/Amprobe-BAT200-Battery-Tester-/282415287281

There are quite a few do it thyself battery tester construction
articles.  Pick whichever looks good:
<https://www.google.com/search?q=build+alkaline+battery+tester

Note:  I've on a campaign to purge from my life as many alkaline
batteries as possible.  I'm tired of leaky batteries destroying my
equipment.  
<
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/crud/Kirkland-AAA-leak.jpg

Mostly, I'm switching to LiIon.  Where that's not possible, LSD (low
self discharge) NiMH cells.  If the device will not run on NiMH, it
gets recycled.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 11:01:27 AM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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on't know what that would be for each size though. I want to build a little
 test fixture for this with a meter and the appropriate load connected for  
each size. Can someone please tell me what the appropriate loads would be.  
Thanks, Lenny
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1138197569>
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on-a-h-1630525062>

That second one is good.  (I'd say they figured it out.)  

For alkaline, I just measure the open circuit voltage...  
that seems to be good enough for me.   1.6 fully charged,
1.4 OK, 1.2 or less pitch it.  

George H.  

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Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Tuesday, 19 September 2017 19:40:57 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com  wrote:
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 don't know what that would be for each size though. I want to build a litt
le test fixture for this with a meter and the appropriate load connected fo
r each size. Can someone please tell me what the appropriate loads would be
. Thanks, Lenny

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+1, simple & adequate for noncritical uses. Clocks stop at around 1.1v, it  
varies.


NT

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 07:20:39 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com
wrote:
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Looks like the consensus is 10 ohms 5 watts for all the 1.5v
batteries:
<https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/179303/what-resistance-load-do-battery-testers-aa-or-aaa-use-in-ohms-please
However, Googling around, I'm finding schematics and recommendations
varying from 8 ohms to 15 ohms.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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** The ESR of a cell or battery is a good guide to its condition.  

 A fresh AA alkaline measures 0.1 ohms or lower while a tired one measures 1 ohm or greater, a fresh 9V measures under 1 ohm. Along with a voltage test you have enough info to match or discard used cells.  

....  Phil  

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
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What's a good way to do that ?

Greg

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
GS wrote:

--------------------
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**  Do what ?  

 Test ESR or correlate it with open cct cell voltage?  



.... Phil  


Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
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ESR.

Greg

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 3:35:43 AM UTC-4, GS wrote:
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h a

IIRC, you take the open circuit voltage and write it down.  You take a volt
age reading under a known fixed load and write that down. You plug those tw
o voltage readings along with the load resistance value into a formula (tha
t I can't recall) and you get the internal resistance of the battery.

Waaaay too much trouble IMO.  In recent years, I've found OC voltage suffic
ient to determine battery condition of basic alkaline cells.  For high drai
n applications such as flash lights, anything at 1.5 is fine.  For lower dr
ain things like pocket radios or remote controls, anything above 1.3 works  
for many months.  Any cell that reads 1.55 or above is virtually new.


Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 7:46:39 AM UTC-4, John-Del wrote:
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ith a
  
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ltage reading under a known fixed load and write that down. You plug those  
two voltage readings along with the load resistance value into a formula (t
hat I can't recall) and you get the internal resistance of the battery.
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icient to determine battery condition of basic alkaline cells.  For high dr
ain applications such as flash lights, anything at 1.5 is fine.  For lower  
drain things like pocket radios or remote controls, anything above 1.3 work
s for many months.  Any cell that reads 1.55 or above is virtually new.

Wow, too much trouble?  It's just ohm's law.  
Say V_O is open circuit voltage, V_L is with load R.  
I = V_L/R
Bat_R = (V_O-V_L)/I
(The ESR may change with load current...  
I don't know.)

George H.

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Friday, September 22, 2017 at 9:06:27 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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 with a
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voltage reading under a known fixed load and write that down. You plug thos
e two voltage readings along with the load resistance value into a formula  
(that I can't recall) and you get the internal resistance of the battery.
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fficient to determine battery condition of basic alkaline cells.  For high  
drain applications such as flash lights, anything at 1.5 is fine.  For lowe
r drain things like pocket radios or remote controls, anything above 1.3 wo
rks for many months.  Any cell that reads 1.55 or above is virtually new.
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Yes, waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too much t
rouble.  With alkalines, a volt meter tells me *immediately* what I need to
 know if I don't have my battery checker with me. If it's 1.6, it's  new.  
1.5 good as new.  Anything above 1.3 is good for at least half the life of  
a new battery.  Anything lower I don't bother with.

In the old days, some batteries would read decent OC voltage and still sag  
under their intended load.  I haven't seen a battery in many years that wou
ld show good OC voltage and sag under load.

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On 9/22/2017 6:06 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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You take a voltage reading under a known fixed load and write that down.

You plug those two voltage readings along with the load resistance

value into a formula (that I can't recall) and you get the internal  
resistance of the battery.
Which voltage do you use?
When you apply the load, the voltage starts to drop.
So, which voltage along that curve do you use?
And when you "let go", the voltage won't return to the original level.
Note that the voltage at the instant you apply the load won't be available
unless you use a scope, or some otherwise accurate sampling to measure it.

Great in theory, but not nearly so simple in practice.


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Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Sunday, September 24, 2017 at 5:34:07 AM UTC-4, mike wrote:
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with a

e
.


If you're applying a load suitable enough to cause a constant drift of volt
age or the OC voltage doesn't return to pre test state, the load is too hig
h for the battery in question or the battery is shot.  Old School battery t
esters used to use a switch to select which resistor to load down the batte
ry in question, AA, AAA, C, etc., while displaying the battery voltage on t
he meter. The only time I saw the meter drift downward was if selecting a D
 battery test for a AAA for instance.


Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Sunday, 24 September 2017 19:32:47 UTC+1, John-Del  wrote:
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.
ne
g with a
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.
.
ble
it.
ltage or the OC voltage doesn't return to pre test state, the load is too h
igh for the battery in question or the battery is shot.  Old School battery
 testers used to use a switch to select which resistor to load down the bat
tery in question, AA, AAA, C, etc., while displaying the battery voltage on
 the meter. The only time I saw the meter drift downward was if selecting a
 D battery test for a AAA for instance.

If your battery voltage is drifting down, its ESR is drifting up. If you wa
nt to know  what state it's in after the test you'd use the last voltage re
ading. But there's no point, if it's dropping noticeably either it's had it
s day or the test load is too high.


NT

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On 9/24/2017 12:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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Do the math.
How much current do you apply?
How much voltage represents 0.1  ohm of ESR?
Compare that to the change of voltage over a second when you apply
that current to a brand new battery.
The battery model is more than a resistor in series with a fixed voltage
source.
Maybe someone here can supply the actual model of a battery that represents
the voltage over time for a given current as a function of recent  
history of the battery load.

The only way I got usable ESR results for matching cells was to apply a  
square wave switching
from one non-zero load to a different non-zero load and measuring
the amplitude of the square wave...always using the same frequency
of square wave.
The devil is in the details.

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On Monday, 25 September 2017 02:03:00 UTC+1, mike  wrote:
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n.
 one
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ng with a
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s.
wn.
.
lable
e it.
 voltage or the OC voltage doesn't return to pre test state, the load is to
o high for the battery in question or the battery is shot.  Old School batt
ery testers used to use a switch to select which resistor to load down the  
battery in question, AA, AAA, C, etc., while displaying the battery voltage
 on the meter. The only time I saw the meter drift downward was if selectin
g a D battery test for a AAA for instance.
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u want to know  what state it's in after the test you'd use the last voltag
e reading. But there's no point, if it's dropping noticeably either it's ha
d its day or the test load is too high.
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ts
  
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that's all good if you want precision. In a lot of cases it's enough to see
 that oc voltage is down or it's drooping under load a good bit so it's sho
t.


NT

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
GS wrote:

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** Err - with an ESR meter, like this one:  

http://bobparker.net.au/esr_meter/esrmeter.htm



.....  Phil  



Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
On 9/21/2017 4:55 PM, Phil Allison wrote:
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Have you ever tried to measure the ESR of a battery with one of
these?

I bought an EBAY RLC/ESR tester.
Found it useless measuring batteries.
NO, putting a cap in series didn't help.
Tried testing two batteries in series(reversed
so the terminal voltage was zero).
Not sure why, but I couldn't find any way to test battery ESR
with it.  Had to go back to pulse generator and scope.

Re: What is the proper way to test alkaline batteries?
mike wrote:

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** Been doing just that for 20 years, I know Bob Parker and he endorses the method.  

I wrote a short article on the idea and won nice prize from the publishers.  

Long as the ESR meter uses high frequency AC ( 20kHz to 100kHz) to measure impedance it will do cells as well.  



.... Phil  

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