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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
Tim R wrote:

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** Trying to disparage WD-4O by pointing out it is a mixture of a common solvents and light mineral oil is ridiculous.

Its the *physical properties* of the mixture that make it work. The only  
way to know how well is to try using it on a variety of jobs over a period  
of time.  

I have done this long ago so am happy to recommend its use and comfortable that most will either have some on hand or can get it cheaply almost anywhere on earth.



...  Phil



Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 9:51:02 PM UTC-4, Phil Allison wrote:
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I've used it for many decades and always have a can nearby.  It's not the optimal choice for all applications but most of the time is "good enough."

Reading the MSDS made it clear to me that it's a pretty variable mixture of various chain length hydrocarbons; surely one batch differs significantly from the next.  

Oh, and it's far better on locks than graphite.  

And terrible on an airgun.  (at least on a springer)


Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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Im satisfied with the description of mineral spirits and light mineral oil.
I laugh some say fish oil. Upon investigating, there seems to be a trace of
bug oil. I think it was a variety of stink bug. LOL.

Greg

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 03/13/18 21:50, Phil Allison wrote:
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It also makes a good perfume for women who are interested in gearheads. ;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

(Stainless welding flux is another good one.)

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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At least PB Blaster actually displaces water instead of floating on water.

Greg

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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I think PB Blaster will melt polystyrene. Not sure about W40.

Greg

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
GS wrote:

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** The solvent in WD-40 damaged does not damage any of the plastics commonly
used in electronic or electrical components.  

In normal use, the solvent evaporates in 10 to 15 minutes having done its job of softening the contaminating material so merely operating the switch, pot or connector completes the cleaning operation.



....   Phil
  

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 18:01:50 -0700 (PDT), Phil Allison

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Just a heads up, don't use any isopropyl alcohol containing cleaners
on coal based plastics (Mainly old eastern block products.) I had just
repaired a camera and sprayed the meter pots.  The plastic gears
instantly turned into goo.

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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 03/15/18 17:26, Chuck wrote:
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IPA makes a mess of acrylic too--it crazes the surface instantly.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On Friday, March 16, 2018 at 7:04:58 PM UTC-5, Phil Hobbs wrote:
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So does DEET. Keep it off your motorcycle gauge faces.

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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I have been using Naptha cleaning fogged headlights for a tempoary fix.
Actuall Seafoam mix.

Greg

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 03/10/18 10:56, John Robertson wrote:
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Carbon tet is awesome.  It'll take out grease stains that nothing  
aqueous will touch.

Of course you have to use it in the open air!

TCE is almost as good and much much safer.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs


--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
The right product is Siceront KF F2, an excellent  contact cleaner. It  
is either curative and preventive.


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WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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I never knew WD40 could work with non-metal. Look at this CD unjamming arti
cle:

Muskegon Chronicle: Stan Harrison: Jammed DVD/CD tray? Fix it yourself for  
less than $1 - Mar 4, 2012 It's happened to you. I know it has.  

Getting started (middle of article)

Unplug the DVD player and take it to your workshop.  Make sure you have a c
lean surface and plenty of light.  A flashlight can help when looking at sm
all parts.  You'll need a small Phillips screwdriver, a small flat-blade sc
rewdriver, a cotton swab and some WD-40 lubricant.  

First, look at the underside of the player.  On some models, there's a slot
 that might say something like this:  "For ejection, insert a pin and push  
to left." In other words, if the DVD tray is stuck -- like yours is -- stic
k a straightened paper clip or narrow screwdriver in the slot and push it t
o the left. Voila! The tray will pop open, and you can retrieve your DVD. I
f you can get the tray open, leave it partially open. It will make removing
 the cover of the DVD player easier.  

And that's the next step -- removing the cover. Carefully study the case an
d remove any screws that look as though they're holding the cover in place.
 Be sure to sort the screws. Tape them to a sheet of paper and label them s
o you'll be able to properly reassemble the player.  

Once you've removed the cover, you should be able to easily slide the tray  
open.  If you can't, don't force it. Forcing the tray could strip or damage
 the gears, and then you will indeed be buying that new DVD player. Instead
, use a small flat-blade screwdriver to press against the cogs on one of th
e gears beneath the tray. You may have to tip the player on its side and pe
er into the tray slot with a flashlight. As you push the screwdriver to rot
ate the gears, the tray should start to slide open.  

Replacing the broken belt  

Once the tray slides open, you should be able to see a small motor, some ge
ars, and if you're lucky, a broken belt. Remove and keep the broken belt fo
r size. If the belt is missing, take a piece of string and snugly wrap it w
here the belt should be. Mark and cut the string to size. This will be the  
size of your replacement belt.  

Now for the cheap trick. With the broken belt or piece of string in hand, h
ead for the plumbing section -- that's right, the plumbing section -- of yo
ur hardware store or home center. You'll want a rubber O-ring, which is typ
ically used to repair leaky, dripping faucets.  Find an O-ring that matches
 as closely as possible the size of your broken belt or your piece of strin
g. If you can't find an exact match, go for the slightly smaller size.  

Put the rubber O-ring in place on your DVD player. If the tray struggles to
 open or close, the O-ring may be too small. If the next size up is too lar
ge, try flexing the O-ring a bit to loosen it up.  

Now, using a cotton swab, apply a small amount of WD-40 to the tray guides  
(groves along the bottom of the tray) for lubrication. This will help the t
ray glide more easily.  

Reattach the cover (you do remember which screws go where, right?) and you'
re back in business!  

Not only have you saved yourself $40, but by not tossing your DVD player in
to the landfill, you've helped save the planet.  

 You've just finished watching your favorite movie on DVD, then press the e
ject button on your DVD player.  

Nothing happens. You press again. And again. And again. The tray is stuck.  
Now what?  

You could take your DVD player to the nearest electronics repair shop. But  
they'd probably charge just as much or more to look at it as it would cost  
to replace it. So unless your DVD player is still under warranty or you've  
purchased an extended warranty, you're out of luck.  

Instead, you resign yourself to purchasing a new DVD player, one of those i
nexpensive ones for less than $40. You pry your stuck player open, retrieve
 your DVD, junk the now-damaged player and head to the nearest big box elec
tronics store.  

Save yourself that $40. Sometimes simply unplugging the player for a few mi
nutes will reset the electronics, and you'll once again have a fully functi
oning DVD player. If that doesn't work, don't give up yet. For a trip to a  
hardware store or home center and less than $1, you still might be able to  
fix that stuck DVD tray yourself.  
The DVD tray is connected to a series of gears, a motor and a rubber belt.  
When the motor is engaged, it turns the belt, which in turn moves the gears
 that open or close the tray. The problem typically is a broken belt. The m
otor turns on, but with no belt, it can't turn the gears that operate the t
ray.  

Of course, you could try to buy a new rubber belt online -- if you can find
 one. But even though the cost of the belt itself wouldn't be much, the cos
t of shipping would hardly make it worth your while.  

(Start of article)
So what'll it be -- $1 or $40? There's nothing to lose. Even if you mess up
 while attempting your own repair, you simply end up buying yourself a new  
DVD player anyway.  
--  http://www.mlive.com/homeandgarden/index.ssf/2012/03/stan_harrison_jamm
ed_dvdcd_tra.html

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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I want some LPS3 or rustproofing my car parts. I think it might be good on
connectors too.

Greg

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
CRC electronics cleaner from Walmart. Exotic cleaners from Allied Electronics

WD is deodorized kerosene.

WD would emulsify heavy deposits n then use CRC removing the WD.

CRC bottles on the shelf used with the pipe are compressed air/solvent tools.

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On Monday, May 8, 2017 at 9:20:16 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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when cleaning with CRC n pipe, full flow is designed n appliedas the fluid evaps leaving a clean surface but with silicone or WD try an artists paint brush or Q tip .....PCBlaster also. PC asks for a slow down wobbly pin pressure for the first half tank.

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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** CRC is a brand, not a product.  

   CRC 2-26 is near identical to WD40.  


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 ** Utter BULLSHIT !!!!

  Rest of you absurd crap deleted.  



WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
CRC ELECTRICAL CLEANER  

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