WD-40 to clean electric contacts?

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WD-40 to clean electric contacts?

I'm on vacation and renting a room, and my landlady has a combination
CD/Radio/Cassette?, very compact, portable, works well except fo the
little on/off/CD slide switch.  

The switch doesn't easily make contact, even when pushed to and past
the On position.   So it's hard to get the radio on, and it turns off
by itself in about 30 minutes.    Moving the switch back and forth 10
times to clean it hasn't worked yet.  

Normally what I would do is spray contact cleaner or tuner cleaner in
the switch from above, where the plastic slider that goes over the
switch is,   And normally that doesn't accomplish much.  

Even taking such things apart and spraying the switch from underneath
has taken longer to work than for rheostats, for example, and here I
don't want to take it apart.  She's only my landlady.  

 I don't know where in this non-English-speaking country to buy
contact cleaner and she might balk at the extra money, but she does
have something in an  aerosol can that looks mighty like WD-40.  

I have this vague recollection that WD-40 is good to clean electric
contacts??  Either that or it's bad for them.    Should I try it.  

BTW, I want to use the radio, so that's one big reason I want it
fixed.  When it stopped playing while she was  there, she said, "Oh,
yeah, maybe that's why I bought another one"  (She speaks English.)  

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 01.05.17 18:07, Micky wrote:
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Trying it, will certainly not make things worse.
And cleaning/flooding the switch a day or two later with
something volatile,(alcohol,turpentine or such) will take
care of the wd40 residue(maybe).
I don't think it will make things worse.

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
Sjouke Burry wrote:
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** No need to do that, the reside is just light mineral oil.  


....  Phil  
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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 5/1/2017 12:39 PM, Sjouke Burry wrote:
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Very bad idea.  Contact cleaner is specifically formulated for the job  
and won't cause any harm to electronics.  A friend used WD40 on some  
very expensive chemical instrumentation as "preventive maintenance" and  
the volatile solvents in it melted the shafts to the collars on the pots  
freezing them.  So he had a service call the next day where he had to  
replace the pots he sprayed.

--  

Rick C

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
Prickman is a Liar wrote:

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  ** Lie number 1.  


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** Lie number two.  

Most so called "contact cleaners" are hopeless at fixing noisy switches and pots. The solvents use are too weak and evaporate so fast they do not do anything. Plus there is no residual oil to protect metal surfaces from corrosion.  



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** Why is it always a "friend" who has weird experience with WD40 and never the person posting ??

Cos the story is a complete fabrication.  



...  Phil  





Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
writes
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While I'm sure that there have been occasions when a squirt of WD40 has  
dissolved everything in sight, I've been using it for decades, and I've  
never found it has ever caused any such damage.
--  
Ian

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 05/02/2017 01:45 AM, Ian Jackson wrote:
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Not WD-40 but I found out that using Lock-Ease on a bicycle chain lock  
with plastic internal parts is a poor idea :) Even worse is having the  
chain wrapped around the bike and an immobile object at the time.



Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On Tue, 2 May 2017 08:45:41 +0100, Ian Jackson

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 I can tell you one thing it is DEFINITELY no good for.
I have EuroVynyl brand tilt turn side dlider windiws - made with Rehau
vinyl extrusions. When cleaning the windows my wife drcided to
lubricate the pivot blocks with WD-40.She then could not get the
blocks to slide in the track. I ended up moving the top block far
enough to pop the window sash out of the sliders, drive the block to
the end, cut the top of the track and pry out the block. Luckily I had
purchased a few  sets of the lovot blocks and other parts fron the
manufacturer when I bought the windowsn(I worked for the dealer) so I
was able to replace the swollen blocks. No amount of soaking in
alcohol or any othe substance was effective in returning the block to
the proper size. No idea what kind of plastic it was- but it sure
didn't like WD-40.

If using wd-40 to disolve hardened grease in a slide switch, ALWAYS
finish the job with a contact cleaner to flush out the remains.

In automotive switches, like power window, door lock, headlight, etc,
when I've had to dissassemble them and clean/polish contacts etc I
re-assemble using a synthetic silicone based grease which won't
harden.WD 40 can be an effective solvent for softeninf and removing
the old "boogers" - . It can also be acceptable for "burnishing"
plug-in connectors and keeping them from corroding - things like
wiring harnes plugs - but the old TV Tuner dope works a lot better if
you can still find it.

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 11:57:29 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
 Luckily I had
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I've heard of certain materials that swell in the presence of oils.  Maybe it wasn't the solvent in the WD but the mineral oil it contains.  IOW, any spray with mineral oil might have had the same effect.


Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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According to the chart at  

  http://www.plasticsintl.com/plastics_chemical_resistence_chart.html

mineral oil has a "C" compatibility rating for polycarbonate and
polypropylene ("Moderate attack of appreciable absorption.  Material
will have limited life.")

For "Lubricating oils (petroleum)" HDPE also gets a "C" rating.

For "white spirit", the plastics listed are all either "A" (no attack,
possibly slight absorption, negigible effect on mechanical properties)
or "*" (no data available).



Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
Dave Platt wrote:

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** Irrelevant - cos charts like that are based on long term contact.

The solvents in WD40 **vanish** after a short time leaving only mineral oil behind.  

Do you own tests and you will see nothing happens.  

BTW:  you are being a PITA troll.  


....  Phil  




Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 5/2/2017 1:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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Does it really matter which component of WD-40 causes the problem or if  
other products cause the same problem?  The point is that WD-40 is not a  
good product to use on electrical devices unless you know the materials  
won't be affected by it.

Some people here are in denial about the issue and refuse to consider  
that anything other than their own personal experience constitutes  
reality.  You seem a bit more reasonable.

--  

Rick C

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 5:22:46 PM UTC-4, rickman wrote:
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ybe it wasn't the solvent in the WD but the mineral oil it contains.  IOW,  
any spray with mineral oil might have had the same effect.
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For the purposes of the discussion, I think it does.  If most spray elixirs
 use some sort of petroleum based oil that has a long term affect on certai
n plastics, then it's not fair to single out WD40 particularly.  In any cas
e, I don't recall any other spray solutions that use a synthetic lube that  
trumpet the fact that they are safe for all plastics.  If WD had a known is
sue with plastics, someone (if not the WD folks) would surely step in with  
a fix product to steal the sales.


 The point is that WD-40 is not a  
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That's good advice for any external additive.  I always test the material i
n question.  Still, other than the fellow with the swollen window blocks (p
robably an interference fit as it was designed), I think WD-40 will have no
 affect on electrical connectors.



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I don't even use the stuff...


Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 5/2/2017 5:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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I don't know what "fair" has to do with it.  Someone suggested using  
WD-40 as a contact cleaner and I as well as a couple others pointed out  
it can cause problems.  Others disputed this.  Bottom line it WD-40 is  
not safe to use without checking the materials in use.  There are many  
products that are specifically intended as contact cleaners which don't  
cause these problems.


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Exactly.  Some here have said WD-40 is universally safe to use when it  
is not.


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How exactly do you do that without using it on the product in question?


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I can't say that universally.  As I mentioned, a friend used it on an  
expensive piece of chemical instrumentation and it froze the controls.  
I guess if the problem is caused by swelling the material and the  
connector has a very loose fit, it might not cause a problem.  But why  
take the chance when there are other products that just plain *won't*  
cause a problem?


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--  

Rick C

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 5/2/2017 10:48 PM, Phil Allison wrote:
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This is why I use De-Oxit as a cleaner and follow up with
Fader-lube on controls and Pro-Gold on switches.

The only things I use WD-40 for are:
1. Hosing a distributor cap and ignition wiring after it's
    gotten wet. I used to do this regularly with a '65 Dodge
    Slant-six engine.
2. Removing labels from equipment and the adhesive residue.
3. Occasionally spraying to the of my table saw. (It's cast
    iron.)
4. Using it instead of ether as a spray starter for 2-cycle
    engines. (Like chain saws and the like.) Although I think
    they stopped using propane as a propellant.


--  
Jeff-1.0
wa6fwi
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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
Foxs Mercantile wrote:
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** You must be a raving nut case.  




....  Phil  

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 5/3/2017 1:20 AM, Phil Allison wrote:
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Well thank you Phil.
I just stated what I use.
I do it because it works.



--  
Jeff-1.0
wa6fwi
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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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You are obviously the sort of person who believes in do things  
thoroughly, and using the right tool for the job.

I can understand this if your doing it professionally, or if it's the  
sort of thing you find you need to quite often - but are you convinced  
that the end result is substantially better than a quick squirt of WD?
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--  
Ian

Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
On 5/3/2017 4:47 AM, Ian Jackson wrote:
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As a professional, I don't like things coming back. Period.

As to using WD-40, some time ago, I acquired several 5-tube
table radios at an estate sale. Basically worthless, and with
all the usual age related issues you'd expect. I tried WD-40
on the volume controls. Yes it works (are you paying attention
Phil?)

I just don't feel comfortable using it.


--  
Jeff-1.0
wa6fwi
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Re: WD-40 to clean electric contacts?
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I never had a problem using WD40 on anything, except pots would need more
at some point. Just does not last as a lube.

Greg

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