Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?

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Hi,

Inherited an electronics unit that has severe contact corrosion due to bad alkaline batteries.

Appreciate any suggestions how to restore these contacts to working condition.

Thanks

Ken

Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
On Saturday, February 17, 2018 at 1:05:38 PM UTC-5, KenO wrote:
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The first thing to try when removing battery snot is plain old water.  If the plating is gone, you'll either have to replate or replace the contacts for reliable contact.

Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
John-Del schrieb:
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As has been suggested in a previous thread: (concentrated) white vinegar.

HTH

Reinhard

Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
On 2018/02/17 12:06 PM, Reinhard Zwirner wrote:
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Actually the EverReady battery engineer I spoke to back in the late 80s  
recommended white vinegar:water with a 50:50 ratio, not pure or  
concentrated white vinegar.

A weak acid to neutralize a weak base.

And as Peter W. so correctly pointed out, the common zinc/carbon battery  
leaks a mild acid and so you use baking soda (a mild base).

So be sure to identify the type of battery before attempting corrective  
measures.

John :-#)#

--  
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                      John's Jukes Ltd.
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Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
John Robertson schrieb:
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[...]
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My experience: concentrated white vinegar achieves best results. But
YMMV ...

[...]
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FACK!

Best regards

Reinhard

Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?


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Dry corrosion/residue is best removed mechanically - once its clean enough  
for reliable contact, give it a squirt of silicone spray.

Don't try rebuilding contact surfaces with solder, oxidisation makes  
unreliable contact - sometimes its possible to graft on a strip of clean  
metal - solder it on, but don't get any on the contact surface.  


Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
Per KenO:
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White vinegar applied with a Q-Tip worked for me the one time I had a similar
situation.
--  
Pete Cresswell

Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
Thanks everyone for your suggestions!!!

Will try to combine any questions.

"...identify the type of battery before attempting corrective  
measures"  Unfortunately the person I received the electronic device from removed the batteries and does not remember if the batteries were zinc/carbon or alkaline.

Question: Can baking soda if used on the residue left by alkaline batteries cause additional damage?


Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
Your initial post said alkaline batteries.


On Monday, February 19, 2018 at 9:37:37 AM UTC-6, KenO wrote:
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Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
On Monday, February 19, 2018 at 9:37:37 AM UTC-6, KenO wrote:

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es cause additional damage?

For the most part, none of the items suggested here will cause damage, even
 if not the "ideal" solution. Vinegar at household strength is quite mild a
nd will not cause horrendous damage to much of anything if used judiciously
. Baking Soda is similarly fairly inert. Both have indirect virtues inasmuc
h as they are effective anti-odorants as well as being reasonably effective
 germicides and fungicides. The key with using any water-based cleaning met
hods on electronics is the complete removal of same at the end of the proce
ss.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA  

Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
On 2/19/18 9:37 AM, KenO wrote:
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Simple really. Alkaline batteries leave what looks like white fuzzy
crystals. Some times with bluish green tint.

Zinc Carbon batteries leave what looks like rusty brown sludge. That is
also spread about more and not confined to just the terminals.


--  
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
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Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
On 2018/02/19 8:08 AM, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
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You could test a small portion of the corrosion crystals with a drop of  
vinegar - if it fizzes then it is alkaline. For certainly test another  
bit with a drop of backing soda dissolved in water, this time it  
shouldn't fizz if the vinegar did.

John :-#)#

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Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
On Monday, 19 February 2018 16:08:53 UTC, Fox's Mercantile  wrote:
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NiCd also white


NT

Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
"white vinegar" search

checked the top Google results but did not find any mention to either dilute with water or use full strength.
https://hallmark.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/3918/~/how-to-clean-a-battery-compartment-containing-corroded-alkaline-batteries .
https://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-to-clean-battery-corrosion/
http://www.radioworld.com/columns-and-views/0004/vinegar-is-your friend/323304

John and Reinhard do you have any references for your recommendations?






Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
On 2018/02/19 7:52 AM, KenO wrote:
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I'm afraid my information was in a telephone conversation back in the  
early 90s when I was investigating the best way to deal with ni-cad and  
other alkaline battery corrosion and called a number of battery  
companies (this was prior to the Internet). The advice given has been  
tested subsequently on countless pinball and video game MPU boards by  
many people and the results are positive. I wrote several articles in  
our industry trade magazines to get the word out, and have subsequently  
posted on my web site more info.

http://www.flippers.com/battery.html

First posted in 1997:

https://web.archive.org/web/19970412183538/www.flippers.com/battery.htm
(added the 'l' to 'htm' in 1998)

It doesn't always work, the corrosion can be too extensive for  
economical repairs, but boards that have been treated as advised have  
rarely failed if they worked after cleaning (and corroded IC sockets,  
etc. replaced). Boards where traces are missing are normally too far  
gone, but have been saved with extensive repairs.

John :-#)#
--  
(Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)
                      John's Jukes Ltd.
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Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
wrote:

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You're doing better at repairing corrosion damage than me.  The
problem is that the corrosive fluid tend to narrow the trace width of
traces that are still making a connection.  Add a little current
through the trace, and you have a fuse.  Also, the electrolyte acts
like, well... and electrolyte.  Two parallel traces, separated by a
hygroscopic PCB, with a DC voltage across the gap, is going to slowly
erode one trace, while building up the other.  The net result is that
it works for a while, and then craps out again.

I just had both of these effects happen while trying to fix a Rayovac
LED head lamp.  I think it was this model:
<https://www.walmart.com/ip/Rayovac-Virtually-Indestructible-3-AAA-Industrial-Grade-LED-Headlight/53982706
It's quite a decent head lamp, at a good price, and is rate to be
water resistant up to IPX4 (splashing water).  However, there's no
protection against the alkaline batteries leaking all over the PCB.  I
gave up after it came back the 4th time with essentially the same
problem.

The damaged PCB is in my "to be recycled" bin.  I can take a photo and
post it if anyone wants to see the mess.


--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
On Monday, February 19, 2018 at 1:37:53 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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Depends on what you're dealing with. $20 electronics deserve no effort unle
ss it's for the satisfaction.  But like John, I've repaired extensive PC da
mage where the board is unavailable or stupidly expensive.  Back in the pro
jection TV heyday, I used to do tons of Mitsubishis that suffered coolant l
eaks onto double side plated through hole circuits both for myself and othe
r dealers that wouldn't attempt it. I bought a stereo microscope to help id
entify missing/damaged traces and damaged plated through holes.  The TVs we
re several thousand dollars to replace and the boards were several hundred  
dollars when they were available.  Even so, changing the main boards on Mit
sus meant a total realignment afterwards.

You do what you have to do.


Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
wrote:

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While reading this thread, several questions keep coming up.

First, why cant the battery makers design batteries that cant leak? I
suppose cost is the main reason, but it would seem that there could be a
coating of something like silicone rubber or some sort of plastic that
could contain any leakage inside the battery's container.

Secondly, I often read on instructions "Do not mix battery types".
Meaning dont use both carbon-zinc and alkaline batteries together. I
have often questioned the reasoning for that. ??? I am aware that
Carbon/zinc batteries produce 1.5V and Alkaline produce 1.2V, so that
could be an issue with some electronics, but would probably not matter
in a flashlight.

I do sort of wonder if mixing battery types would cause corrosion and
leakage between the two dissimilar batteries, the same way connecting
copper plumbing pipes to a galv steel pipe does. I've seen the
dielectric corrosion occur mostly at the joint between the different
pipe materials, which is the first place for a leak to occur. (They do
make dielectric unions to isolate the metals),  

Then the thought also occurs, what wouyld happen if both types of
batteries began to leak at the same time. Would one leaking chemical
neutralize the other, or would the two chemicals react and cause a
reaction, which may produce dangerous fumes, or create heat, which could
result in a fire? (I never studied chemistry, so I really dont know).  

Lastly, Has anyone ever come up with a "Battery Pan", meaning an
enclosure around the battery compartment that would keep leakage
confined to ONLY the battery compartment? If not, why not?  
In an ideal world, the battery compartment for all electronics would be
removable and replacable, with a universal battery holder (for each type
of battery). This would also be leak proof. I'm sure this could be done,
but once again, we're back to cost. And we live in a disposible world,
so I dont forsee this ever happening.



Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
KenO schrieb:

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Own experience (with alkaline battery corrosion) a few hours ago :-(
<sigh> ... I have to admit though that my experience is just with the
battery contacts and not with PCB corrosion.

HTH

Reinhard

Re: Tips to Remove Alkaline Battery Contact Corrosion?
John-Del,

"The first thing to try when removing battery snot is plain old water.  If the plating is gone, you'll either have to replate or replace the contacts for reliable contact"

I hope the plating is OK  

Will plain water cause additional damage if the plating is damaged?

Ian,

"Dry corrosion/residue is best removed mechanically - once its clean enough  
for reliable contact, give it a squirt of silicone spray"

What do you suggest to mechanically remove the dry residue?  It seems to be adherent to the contact surface (not loose and flakey).

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