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Re: N. Cook
snipped-for-privacy@outlook.com says...
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I am retired and never worked with the SMD.  I watched many of the  
Rossmann youtubes to learn about how to work with the SMD.  If you don't  
mind his tlk, he gives some very good ideas and teaching about them.  I  
bought one of the microscopes he recommended and an inexpensive hot air  
and soldering iron station for about $ 65.  While I don't think it would  
hold up under much usage, it works well for hobby usage.  If I was using  
the tools to make any money with, I would buy a better hot air station.

There are several other good videos on youtube that show how to work  
with the smd.  I think there is a woman named Jessica that does a lot of  
them.

I really like working with the smd better than the through hole devices  
once I find the problem.  Found the kapton tape to keep the hot air off  
parts that are close in works well.  It just takes the correct tools to  
make it easy to work with.



Re: N. Cook


"Ralph Mowery"  wrote in message  

snipped-for-privacy@outlook.com says...
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I am retired and never worked with the SMD.  I watched many of the
Rossmann youtubes to learn about how to work with the SMD.  If you don't
mind his tlk, he gives some very good ideas and teaching about them.  I
bought one of the microscopes he recommended and an inexpensive hot air
and soldering iron station for about $ 65.  While I don't think it would
hold up under much usage, it works well for hobby usage.  If I was using
the tools to make any money with, I would buy a better hot air station.

There are several other good videos on youtube that show how to work
with the smd.  I think there is a woman named Jessica that does a lot of
them.

I really like working with the smd better than the through hole devices
once I find the problem.  Found the kapton tape to keep the hot air off
parts that are close in works well.  It just takes the correct tools to
make it easy to work with.



***********************************************************



Yep, once you learn what you need to do the job, then you can start to do  
the jobs, properly.




Gareth.  


Re: N. Cook
wrote:

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John,

I had a 2 tube Crosley radio in 1970 that used WD11s with a tip.  I
couldn't find one back then.  Noticed they are available now for
$225.00.

---
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Re: N. Cook
On 5/11/2017 9:31 PM, Phil Allison wrote:
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Taking a cue from the master of invective,
"Hey Phil, I hope you get bone cancer and die."

I've seen too many previous repairs with broken terminals or
tube socket pins, burnt wiring harnesses bad soldering and
other completely crap examples of workmanship.

Or on newer stuff, lifted pads and burn marks on PC boards
and excess flux and solder blobs.

Like the Hippocratic Oath, "Do no harm." There's no excuse for
leaving a trail of destruction in the wake of a repair.







--  
Jeff-1.0
wa6fwi
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Re: N. Cook
On Friday, 12 May 2017 15:00:41 UTC+1, Foxs Mercantile  wrote:
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There is... when what was there was a pile of charcoal. Then destruction is good.


NT

Re: N. Cook
The Texas Ranger wrote:  
-----------------------
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** You are one giant asshole - aren't you ?  
  

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** Completely off the subject.

  That the best you got, Tex  ???


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** Got SFA to do with making repairs invisible.  

  Go back to you ham radio Tex.  
  


....   Phil

Re: N. Cook


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Recent repair work could've been done elsewhere - warranty repairs for items  
someone else fucked up is the oldest trick in the book.

Taking the back off and look if I signed and dated it is *MUCH* easier than  
searching through a notebook of longer than phone number serial numbers.  


Re: N. Cook
On 2017/05/12 10:47 AM, Ian Field wrote:
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We have a sticker we put on our customers' boards - it has the shop  
name, URL, and work order number (that # is added by pen along with  
quantity of boards 1/x, 2/x...x/x).

The sticker serves two purposes - helps us track board repairs when/if  
it comes back or customer has trouble, and it is advertising for the  
shop - that pays off big time as people buy and sell games all over the  
place and I keep getting notes from folks saying something like "I saw  
your sticker on a game I just bought - do you service or sell XYZ?"

John ;-#)#

--  
(Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)
John's  Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9
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Re: N. Cook


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As far as possible, I avoided dealing with Joe public.

My customers were small local businesses and recommendations kept me busy  
enough.

Some of them turned up with a van load at a time.  


Re: N. Cook
On 2017/05/12 2:15 PM, Ian Field wrote:
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Different market. My shop fixes coin operated amusement machines, hourly  
rate is good, and people appreciate us as we are one ot he few  
professional shops around that deals with these games.

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Other than our customers are mostly private we seem to get a lot of  
referrals.

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We keep a wait list (285 folks on the list = bigger shop needed, so  
moving this week and next, and have to hire more people) - too many jobs!

John :-#)#

--  
(Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)
John's  Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9
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Re: N. Cook
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searching through a notebook of longer than phone number serial numbers. "

Even better, put the last four digits of the SN on the receipt which they must bring in to get warranty service. In some cases it is on a sticker, in which case you can etch it into something inside the cabinet.  


Re: N. Cook
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Here in California, behavior like that on the part of any auto-repair
business would be a violation of the law, and they could have their
license pulled for doing it.

Here's the page on the legal situation and advice in
California... other states' laws may vary.

https://www.bar.ca.gov/consumer/auto_repair_guide.html

They give some very good advice.  In particular "Know Your Rights",
and "Before you sign, be sure you understand the work the technician
will do. Your signature means you agree to pay for the repairs up to
the amount specified. Do not sign a blank work order."

A work order is a contract.  As with any contract, the terms are
largely negotiable, and it's not binding until it's signed.  Signing a
blank work order (one without an agreed-upon upper limit) is legally
like signing a blank check.  Not a good idea.  Revising a contract
offered to you, before you sign it, is your right:  whether the shop
chooses to accept and be bound by the altered contract is the
and decision.

If the "fine print on the work order seems to say I'm authorizing
anything they do", feel free to draw a line through it with your pen
("striking it out") before you sign.  Initial and date the line-out
when you do it, so it's clear that you removed it from the contract.

If they haven't filled in an amount for doing the estimate, ask
specifically "What do you charge for investigating the problem and
giving me an estimate for the repair?"

If they say there's no charge, write "$0.00" in the maximum-
authorized-charge area before you sign it.  If they give you a price,
write in that amount.

Then, sign the authorization.  Keep one copy.

At that point, if they do any work on the car, then they have accepted
your contract as it was when you signed it.  They're bound to the
amount on the form, and can't legally charge you more than that.

If they go ahead and do a repair without giving you the estimate and
getting your authorization, it's on them.

If they refuse to work on your car without having a blank work
order... leave.  Find another auto-repair shop.  And, consider
reporting the offender's behavior to your state's licensing
organization.

[Disclaimer: I Am Not A Lawyer Nor Do I Play One On Television.  Check
 your states' laws to see how this situation plays out in your area.
 Know your rights, and your obligations.]

Re: N. Cook
On Tuesday, 16 May 2017 19:30:32 UTC+1, Dave Platt  wrote:
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We don't have a law like that here in UK. Customers are routinely taken advantage of.


NT

Re: N. Cook
On 5/16/2017 4:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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There is no such law here in the US.  That sort of thing is regulated at  
the state level and good luck getting anything done about a shop without  
having to rent a car until the matter is settled.

--  

Rick C

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