Motorola smartphone battery charging

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I have a < 2 year old Motorola MotoG3 smartphone. The instructions say:  
"Motorola batteries and charging systems have circuitry that protects  
the battery from damage from overcharging." So recently I did not worry  
about leaving it connected to a 5V charger for hours at a time to ensure  
it was always ready for use.

The first symptom was that the flash/torch LED did not light up; I  
wondered if, since this is software mediated, it was a fault in the  
Marshmallow upgrade at about the same time.

Then recently the screen has popped out of the housing, leading me to  
suspect that the battery was not protected as specified and has bulged  
badly. Discussion with Motorola support led only to the offer of a  
charged repair, though I argued that this counts as "unfit for purpose"  
under UK law.

So I have a replacement battery on order and have removed the old one  
which has indeed bulged. It may even have bent the motherboard which is  
reflective enough to show a convex mirror effect. Also the connection  
between the motherboard and the flash/torch LED is just by spring  
contacts next to the battery, so a bulging battery has probably caused a  
disconnection. Thus the failure of the flash/torch LED could have been  
diagnosed, by anyone who knows how the phone is designed, to be caused  
by incipient battery bulge long before it got to the point of screen  
ejection.

Any comments?

Mike.

Re: Motorola smartphone battery charging
On Thu, 15 Jun 2017 11:43:36 +0100, Mike Coon

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1.  Find a USB ammeter and measure the current your phone is drawing.
Something like this:
<http://www.ebay.com/itm/222307766211
If you see any current being drawn after you battery is officially
done charging, then the Motorola charging circuitry in the phone is
NOT working according to your quoted description.  I have a 1st
generation Motorola G3 phone that I can try it later tonite.

2.  LiPo batteries tend to bulge when charged.  There are numerous
examples of the problem:
<https://www.google.com/search?q=bulging+cell+phone+battery&tbm=isch
Here's a rather sane discussion on the causes of bulging batteries:
<https://www.quora.com/What-would-cause-a-phone-battery-to-bulge-in-the-middle
Basically, what's happening is the electrolyte is breaking down into
gasses inside the battery.  I don't know what might happen if you take
a needle and punch a hole in the battery, but I wouldn't recommend
doing that.  In any case, replace the battery.

3.  When something like this happens, there is always a tendency to
search for a suitable culprit.  Is it the charger circuit in the
phone?  Is it a faulty battery?  Is it something that you're doing? Do
you discharge the battery until it's totally discharged, which
incidentally is a great way to kill a LiIon/LiPo cell?  It the
charging system sensitive to temperature, humidity, usage, or phase of
the moon?  Maybe the battery has hit its limit of charge cycles?
Perhaps you might have a counterfeit battery?  Or is it some
combination of these factors?  I can't tell without more information.



--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Motorola smartphone battery charging
On Thursday, 15 June 2017 17:50:56 UTC+1, Jeff Liebermann  wrote:
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Hi Jeff, apologies for the apparent lack of appreciation for your reply (th
ough some of it was a bit obvious!).

I am actually quite familiar with bulging lithium batteries and have a coll
ection of mildly obese ones, mostly due to keeping a device on a charging c
radle unnecessarily. Fortunately they are user-replaceable batteries. What  
is new to me is a non-user-replaceable battery with instructions that state
 it cannot be damaged by overcharging. However since I am not a mere "user"
 I have obtained and fitted the new battery. At least disassembly was large
ly achieved by the battery!

A smart phone has enough potential intelligence to cycle its battery throug
h whatever charge/discharge routine is required to keep it in lean health.  
It is a pity this routine is not enforced...

Mike.

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