Learning Electrical Repair

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
I don't want to pick up another career or spend 20 years learning
electrical repair, but I would like to learn something about this
area.
I don't care for ham radios or tv repair either.
But barring that, I was wondering if anyone knew of any books or web
sites that could help someone learn about this area?  I'd like to try
small interesting projects.
I have a basic understanding of electronics, Ohms laws,
resistors/capacitors in parallel v/s series...I guess that is about
it.  My practical knowledge is limited to car stereos, amps and
speaker.

I've been looking at sites like instructibles.com and a few others
that have some neat projects but most just jump in over my head.  I
have no knowledge of "bread boards" or how to use them, though I have
a general idea of what they are.

I can't solder but I've been trying to learn.
I can't seem to get the solder to "wet" the solder gun or the wires
I'm trying to solder.

It seems like now days everything is just deposable.
A few things I've taken apart have been encased in a resin or epoxy.
What's up with that?  Heat dissipation or repair prevention.


Any suggestions or advice would be most appreciated.

Thanks
B

Re: Learning Electrical Repair
On 11/22/2010 7:48 PM Bewet Miller spake thus:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

How about going to your local library (remember those places that have
those old-fashioned things called "books"?) and checking out a book on
basic electronics. As good a place to start as any.


--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Learning Electrical Repair

Quoted text here. Click to load it


   Then use a soldering IRON.  A soldering gun is for crude work.


Quoted text here. Click to load it


   Waterproofing.

 
Quoted text here. Click to load it


   news:sci.electronics.basics


--
For the last time:  I am not a mad scientist, I'm just a very ticked off
scientist!!!

Re: Learning Electrical Repair
It's a shame there are no major manufacturers of electronic kits, which is a
good way to get started (assuming you know how to solder!).

Try Googling "electronic kits for adults".

You might get one of those "100-in-one" lab-experiment kits and have some
fun with it. None requires soldering.




Re: Learning Electrical Repair
There are at least a couple of companies that still sell electronic kits for
hobbiests/enthusiasts.

Velleman has small kits, but nothing of the same scale as the old Heathkit
equipment.
http://www.vellemanusa.com/us/enu/product/list/?id52%3008

I believe I saw another brand name of small kits available on eBay recently,
but don't remember the name.

Down under, the Dick Smith electronics company may still be selling kits.

I've seen soldering kits available for practicing/learning the skill of
soldering.. and there are probably DVD video instructions for beginners
interested in learning how to solder.

Some of those instructable/DIY websites have some dangerous techniques that
beginners should definitely stay away from.. the line voltage powered nicad
zapper is one example of one of the hazardous procedures I've seen.

There may be some worthwhile youtube videos, but steady cameras and good
clean audio don't seem to be the norm there.
Finding or buying some actual commercially-made soldering tutorial videos
would be best, IMO

--
Cheers,
WB
.............


We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Learning Electrical Repair
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Jaycar sells many kits in Australia.

Re: Learning Electrical Repair
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Start with second-hand kid-level stuff?
http://google.com/images?q=Proto-board+-prototyping-board+-prototype-board+-Protoboard

Quoted text here. Click to load it
After that kid's kit, graduate to this.
http://google.com/images?q=Proto-board+-prototyping-board+-prototype-board+-Protoboard

The public library has already been mentioned.
Project books there were aplenty when I was a kid.

To get parts (and to learn about how stuff is assembled),
tear apart something old enough to have parts with long leads.
Learn how to tell a good part from a zapped part.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Soldering guns were oversold.
Their only advantage is that they heat up  fast.
Mostly they're the wrong tool
(unless you're working on a chassis or something huge
--and even then a giant iron gives better results).
As mentioned, people doing serious electronics work
use a soldering iron--usually temperature-controlled.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Get the surfaces clean first.
If you're working with ancient corroded metal, that's more difficult.
When all the core has drained from the ancient acid-core solder
you're trying to use, this helps:
http://google.com/foogle?q=intitle:paste+intitle:flux&scoring=p&price=between&price1=1&num10%0

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Read the recent "Self-Repair Manifesto" thread.

...and, in a group with "electronics" in its name,
you'll get more empathy if you DON'T say "electrical" repair
--especially if you're not talking about fixing vacuum cleaners
and garbage disposals.  (Akin to saying "electricians".)

Re: Learning Electrical Repair
Quoted text here. Click to load it
I screwed up that link.
http://google.com/images?q15%0-in-1+electronic

Re: Learning Electrical Repair
Quoted text here. Click to load it

 "I can't solder but I've been trying to learn.
  I can't seem to get the solder to "wet" the solder gun or the wires
 I'm trying to solder."

 Perhaps you are using solid core solder made for plumbing.  For
electrical work you want a solder with flux in the core.  (Rosin core
solder is what I like to use.)

George H.

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Learning Electrical Repair
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Basic Electricity and Basic Electronics manuals from
the US Navy are a pretty good introductory set of texts.
It takes practical experience to do the takeapart and
rework, of course (soldering skills are probably not
learnable from bookreading).

My old Basic Electronics "Navpers 10087" was
$2.25 from the U S Government Printing Office in 1955...

Re: Learning Electrical Repair
On 11/23/2010 4:16 PM whit3rd spake thus:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Those texts are OK, but a little dated.

I recently inherited a stack of electronics textbooks (from a dumpster),
including a copy of /Basic Theory  and Application of Transistors/, a
Dover reprint of a 1959 Army textbook. Yes, it does teach the basics of
xistors, but is hopelessly out of date: covers only germanium devices,
all audio circuits use interstage and output transformers, nothing about
FETs, UJTs, etc.

You can probably do better than this.


--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Learning Electrical Repair
On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 17:46:45 -0800, David Nebenzahl

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The NEETS modules are available at various places out there
http://www.tpub.com/neets/ for one.

--
Rich Webb     Norfolk, VA

Re: Learning Electrical Repair
Quoted text here. Click to load it

"Solid gold to make you feel old!"

Yes, I remember that book.



Re: Learning Electrical Repair
On 11/24/2010 4:57 AM William Sommerwerck spake thus:

[replying to my posting]

Quoted text here. Click to load it

So you'd probably agree that this is not the best book for a beginner to
learn about transistors from nowadays?


--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Learning Electrical Repair
Quoted text here. Click to load it



Probably not. Someone else expressed their misgivings.

The "correct" way to learn about transistors is to find a college-level
book. This requires understanding matrix transformations, but you'll have a
better understanding.



Re: Learning Electrical Repair


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Hmm, I remember having to derive Schrodinger's equations from first
principles for my University exams.
Can't say that in all my years of repairing and designing electronic
equipment that this long forgotten knowledge has ever have been at all
useful.



 


Re: Learning Electrical Repair
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I got my Master's degree MSEE from NYU (new york university) in 1961.
Don't remember Schrodinger's equations.

Re: Learning Electrical Repair


Quoted text here. Click to load it



I was at Uni in the late 70's/early 80's.   I can't remember what part of
the Electronics/Electrical Engineering course required extensive knowledge
of Schrodingers doodlings, might have been transmission line systems
(microvaves etc)?  Dunno.  Nor do I care much.
I do remember a past exam question though which required the candidate to
completely prove one such doodling, which I learnt off by heart.   Took
about 3 pages of maths.  Couldn't see the point then, still can't now.

But I'm not bitter.


Re: Learning Electrical Repair
Quoted text here. Click to load it


What does Schrodinger have to do with circuit design, anyway?

The poster wanted to "learn about transistors". I think understanding at
least H parameters is worthwhile.

Offhand, I've never seen a book that covers transistor-circuit operation in
a simple way, or that discusses how one uses that knowledge when trouble
shooting.



Re: Learning Electrical Repair

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Schrodinger worked on the atomic structure of matter.  If you really want to
know how a transistor really works (on a Semiconductor Theory basis), then
maybe he has some use.


My point was that some Electronics books may contain
information/theorys/mathematics not particularly relevent to circuit design
or repairing broken things.



Gareth.



Site Timeline