Do I still need to stock a crossover (Ethernet) cable anymore?

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Today I tried to hook up a Rocket M2 as a super powerful (miles) Wi-Fi
extension for my home router, when the POE light went out whenever I
plugged in the power cable. Huh?

Turns out it's a crossover cable, mixed up with the bunch of my other spare
Ethernet cables.

Do we even need crossover cables anymore?
Or did they go the way of 8-track players?

Re: Do I still need to stock a crossover (Ethernet) cable anymore?
On 2017-02-25 7:32 PM, Jonas Schneider wrote:
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Most devices do not need cross over cables anymore, but there may still  
be the odd one floating around out there.

--  
Froz....

Re: Do I still need to stock a crossover (Ethernet) cable anymore?
On Saturday, February 25, 2017 at 4:32:53 PM UTC-8, Jonas Schneider wrote:
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You HAVE one, which is apparently more than you currently require.
What you want now, is a non-removable label that identifies it as a crossover
cable.

There's a fair amount of older hardware that's still useful, and that cable
 confers a kind of compatibility you will certainly need, soon after you discard it.

Re: Do I still need to stock a crossover (Ethernet) cable anymore?
Jonas Schneider wrote:

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Technically only* gigabit devices are required to support auto MDI/MDI-X  
switching, but in practice most 10/100 devices have also supported it  
for many years.

[*] not sure about 10Gbe and faster, I've only used it over fibre, and  
with a switch between devices, but I would expect it to be auto over  
copper too.


Re: Do I still need to stock a crossover (Ethernet) cable anymore?
On 2/26/2017 12:12 AM, Andy Burns wrote:
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You're never gonna need one...until about a week after you
dispose of it.
Better to have and not need than to need and not have.

Re: Do I still need to stock a crossover (Ethernet) cable anymore?
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That is the way it is for everything.  I worked at a plant that was  
built about 1965.  At that time there was a spare part that looked like  
a big auger.  It was about 10 feet long and a foot in diameter.  It laid  
around in the way up to about 2005.  We got a new plant manager that had  
us get rid of all things we had not had to replace in the last 5 years.  
Out went the auger.  Wouldn't you know it , a month later it was needed  
to replace a bad one. Same as with another piece of equipment .  I  
forgot what it was, something like a 20 HP motor and gear box.  It was  
sold as scrap.  Before it left the plant site it was needed and we had  
to buy it back for a lot more than it was sold for.

I have not seen it, but heard that some new cars do not even have a  
spare tire now,but come with a can of Fix a Flat. Might be fine for a  
nail hole, but if there is a large cut in the tire,itwill be useless.

Re: Do I still need to stock a crossover (Ethernet) cable anymore?
On Sun, 26 Feb 2017 10:21:16 -0500, Ralph Mowery

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  With spares, if it has NOT been needed in over 5 years is the time
to KEEP it, not throw it, unless the machine the spare is for is no
longer in use.

Re: spare wheels
On 27/02/2017 02:21, Ralph Mowery wrote:
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Yes. I had to buy a real spare wheel for my car because it didn't come  
with one. I take it with me on long journeys and have needed it several  
times. Around town, I leave the wheel at home because a friend can bring  
it to me if required. It is a nuisance that there is no storage space  
for the wheel other than the luggage space. There seems to be a well for  
a "space saver" wheel, that they used for storing the bottle of goop and  
air compressor, but I bought a real full-size wheel so that won't fit.

I've read that the goop that they supply instead of a spare wheel will  
ruin the tyre every time, and that seemed an unacceptable waste to me.  
Also as you point out, the goop won't fix a really big hole.





Re: spare wheels
says...
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I hated it when they went to the small tire.  If you are very far away  
from home you either have to poke along or find a place that is open to  
fix or replace the flat tire.  

Some cases not too big of a deal unless it is at night or maybe a  
weekend.  If like the tires I bought I have a guarntee with them, but  
have to go to the chain store I bought them from.  There may not be one  
for many miles and if out of town hard to find one.

I did see a small car driving around town and I am sure they had 4 of  
the 'small spaires' on it.


Re: spare wheels
On Sun, 26 Feb 2017 18:35:19 -0500, Ralph Mowery

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 It's a real bugger if you blow a rear tire on a RWD vehicle with
Limited Slip too. You have to take off a front tire and put the spare
on there, then take off the flat rear and replace with the front - and
from the same side if you have directional tires.
Can't carry a "matching" tire for a spare that way either and leave it
on....Which is part of the reason they went the "no spare" route.

 I know guys who's cars have sat at the dealers or the tire shop for a
WEEK waiting for the right tire to be couriered in from Kentucky or
Florida to Ontario because there was none closer (one was a Mercedes)

Re: spare wheels
On Mon, 27 Feb 2017 10:28:45 +1100, Chris Jones

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It won't fix a cracked valve stem either -

Re: Do I still need to stock a crossover (Ethernet) cable anymore?
On Sun, 26 Feb 2017 10:21:16 -0500, Ralph Mowery

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I've advised friends to carry an inner tube and various tools of the
tire trade if they don't have a real spare tire.  
<https://www.amazon.com/Slime-5001-Auto-Inner-Tube/dp/B000ET8CZM>

When I was doing service calls in the middle of nowhere, I rescued
various 4-wheelers from a long walk by installing an inner tube, and
inflating it with a battery operated compressor.  

The key tool is a bead breaker.  I used two crow bars, which required
2 people to work effectively.  This would probably have been better:
<https://www.eppys.com/37--Classic-Style-Tubeless-Tire-Iron
or one of these:
<https://www.bestbuyautoequipment.com/bead-breaking-tire-hammers-s/1144.htm

I also carried, baby powder, air compressor, valves, valve tools,
valve covers, double ended tire hose, patches, extra rubber cement,
plug kit, etc.  If you've replaced the inner tube on a bicycle or
motorcycle, without removing the tire from the rim, you know how it's
done on an automobile tire.  Incidentally, the small battery operated
tire inflator compressors take only a little less than forever to
inflate a tire.

Oddly, I've only used the plug kit on my various vehicles after
driving over a nail or screw.  However, the other stuff is useful for
fixing other people's tires.  My palatial office is close to where a
major highway dumps into town.  I'm forever plagued by visitors
dropping in after the eventing commute with variations on a tire
puncture.  They would then ask to "borrow" the tire kit, which usually
means me doing the work and dragging the shop air compressor into the
parking lot.  Fortunately, such irritations have ceased in the last
few years, when I've made it a point of going home at a more
reasonable hour.


--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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